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MIDDLESEX COUNTY RECORD SOCIETY. 



PRESIDENT. 

The Right Honourable VISCOUNT ENFIELD, Lord Lieutenant and Gustos 

Rotulorum of Middlesex. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 
His Grace The DuKE OF Devonshire, K.G., P.C, F.R.S., D.C.L.,&c., &c. 
His Grace The Duke of Westminster, K.G., P.C. 
The Most Honourable The Marquis of Northampton. , 
His Eminence Cardinal Manning. 
The Right Honourable The Earl of Jersey. 
The Right Honourable The Earl Cadogan. 
The Right Honourable Lord Hillingdon. 
The Right Honourable LoRD George Francis Hamilton, M.P. 
Lord Eustace Cecil, M.P. 
Sir Spencer Maryon Wilson, Bart. 
Sir John Gibbons, Bart. 

Sir William Hardy, F.S.A., &c.. Deputy Keeper of the Public Records. 
Edward Augustus Bond, Esq., C.B., LL.D., F.S.A., &c., Principal 

Librarian and Secretary of the British Museum. 
Octavius Edward Coope, Esq., M.P. 
Samuel Morley, Esq. 
Thomas Wood, Esq., of Littleton. 

COMMITTEE. 
Edmund Edward Antrobus, Esq., F.S.A., 14, Kensington Palace 

Gardens, W. 
Lord Alfred Spencer Churchill, 16, Rutland Gate, S.W. 
Charles M. Clode, Esq., C.B., F.S.A. 
The Honourable J. F. Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, Castle Hill, 

Reading. 
John Frederick France, Esq., F.S.A., 2, Norfolk Terrace, Bayswater, W. 
Charles Hill, Esq., F.S.A., Rockhurst, West Hoathly, East Grinstead. 
James Marshall, Esq., 37, Grosvenor Road, S.W. 
Sir Francis Brockman Morley, K.C.B., 14, Norland Place, Netting Hill, 

W. 
Sir Richard Nicholson, F.S.A., 19, Cleveland Gardens, Hyde Park, W. 
The Honourable Henry Lewis Noel, 17, Westbourne Terrace, W. 
John Fish Pownall, Esq., 63, Russell Square, W.C. 
Sir William Henry Wyatt, 88, Regent's Park Road, N.W. 

HON. TREASURER. 
Sir Henry William Gordon, K.C.B., 68, Elm Park Road, Chelsea, S.W. 

HON. SECRETARY. 
* Basil Woodd Smith, Esq., Branch Hill Lodge, Hampstead Heath, 
N.W. 

HON. ASSISTANT SECRETARY. 
* E. W. Beal, Esq., M.A., Sessions House, Clerkenwell. 



To luhoru communications may be addressed. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY RECORD SOCIETY. 




HE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX possesses a Collection 
of Old Records relating to its civil and criminal history, 
which, commencing in the year 1549 (the third of 
Edward VI.), and continuing to the present time, covers 
with more or less completeness a period of 335 years. 
BM- Only in Essex and the North Riding of Yorkshire do the 
records date from so early a period as in Middlesex ; while, as the 
Metropolitan County, Middlesex may fairly claim for her Muniments 
that they surpass in interest, as they probably do in extent, and cer- 
tainly (with the two above-named exceptions) in range of time, those 
of any other County in England. 

It is now universally recognized that no real history of any district 
can be written until its Original Records have been thoroughly ran- 
sacked for the varied and minute information they contain ; — informa- 
tion which, trifling and indifferent as much of it may at first sight 
appear, becomes often extremely valuable from the light which it 
throws upon events of far-reaching importance ; and there can be no 
doubt that had the Middlesex Records been accessible to the historical 
student they would long ago have received the attention they deserve, 
and much matter would have been brought to light, interesting and 
valuable not only to the Local but also to the National Historian. 

Until recently, however, such has never been the case. Here, as 
elsewhere, the value of the Memorials of the Past has been unrecog- 
nized, and the documents have been left in a condition which not only 
rendered examination impossible, but seriously endangered their exist- 
ence. Within the last year or two, however, the old County Records 
(including in that category all up to the close of the reign of 
George III.) have been placed in a newly-constructed Muniment 
Room at the Sessions House, Clerkenwell, and have been arranged, 
labelled, and indexed by order of the Court of Quarter Sessions. 
This important work has been carried out, at a cost to the County of 
more than a thousand pounds, under the advice and supervision of 



Mr. CoRDY Jeaffreson, who was in the first instance deputed by the 
Historical MSS. Commissioners to examine and report upon the 
Records, and they are now for the first time made practically available 
for investigation and use. 

The Middlesex County Record Society has been formed for 
the purpose of taking advantage of this improved condition of things 
by calendaring the whole, and printing such a selection from them as 
shall be thought most interesting and valuable. 

It would be impossible within the limits of a brief Prospectus to 
give a complete list of even the various classes of records, forming as 
they do a collection of upwards of ten thousand volumes, and nearly 
five thousand rolls or bundles, each of which contains numerous 
separate documents. They may however be briefly stated to in- 
clude : — 

I. — A Series of Sessions Rolls almost complete, except in some 
of the earlier years, from Edward VI. to 1820, of which Mr. 
Jeaffreson remarks : — 

" Something more should, however, be said of the contents of the Sessions Rolls, 
which comprise considerably more than half a million separate writings, in recognis- 
ances, indictments, and inquisitions post mortem. It having been the usage of the 
Clerks of the Middlesex Justices, from the time of Elizabeth, to put at the foot of 
each recognisance, a brief note of the matter to which the document referred, and 
of the purpose for which the obligation was created, the recognisances of the 
Middlesex Sessional Archives afford a larger measure of entertainment and historical 
information than one would expect to gather from writings, of their class. A con- 
siderable minority of these footnotes yield some interesting particulars of the social 
manners, domestic interests, political ferments, and religious agitations of Londoners 
in olden time. In the fewest possible words they tell the story of a playhouse riot, a 
destructive fire, the arrest of a Jesuit, a daring burglary at Whitehall, the great plate 
robbery of the year, or an outbreak of the London apprentices. They exhibit by 
turns the humour of the Court and the humour of the tavern, the pomp of a noble's 
palace and the cheer of a modest home, the tricks of the professional cardsharper 
and the cunning ways of tradesmen. And these notes are the more deserving of 
attention because they often refer to matters that, either from being dealt with 
summarily, or from being dropped for want of sufficient evidence, do not re-appear 
with greater preciseness and amplitude in the indictments of the subsequent bundles. 
From some of the memoranda curious particulars may be gleaned respecting 
robberies committed in the dwellings of persons stricken by the Great Plague, and 
the dread of incendiaries and makers of explosive compounds that seized the 
Londoners immediately after the Great Fire of Charles the Second's time ; respecting 
the temper and excesses of the Sacheverell rioters ; and respecting the demeanour of 
the London Jacobites, temp. Anne and George I. Some of the indictments are 
especially worthy of examination. A careful manipulator of these sources of 
evidence could extort a large addition to the materials for England's religious history, 
from the records of the presentments of Catholic recusants in the earlier decades, 
and the prosecutions of the Protestant Dissenters in the later decades of the 
seventeenth century. From the indictments for seditious libels he would also recover 
to English literature the heart and life of many a curious tract that perished in the 
Stuart period, in flames kindled by the common hangman. " 



2. — Sessions Books, commencing 1639, containing records of 
sentences passed upon prisoners ; orders relating to the various parishes 
of the County; addresses to the Sovereigns, &c., Src, forming a 
series of 1775 volumes from which much information of value can be 
gleaned. 

3. — Process Books of Indictments, from 16 10 to 177S1 contain- 
ing many interesting entries, including the names of persons fined for , 
not taking the Sacrament. 

4.— Oath Rolls, 1660 to 1820, containing Oaths of Allegiance, 
Suprerhacy, and Abjuration ; Declarations against Transubstantiation ; 
Associations in the reign of William III. ; Clergy Oath Rolls ; Entries 
of the Meeting Places of Dissenters ; &c., &c. 

5. — Registers of the Estates of Papists, 1675 to 1764. 
6. — Justices' Certificates of Convictions and Appeals for 
HOLDING Conventicles, 1664 to 1687. Files of Proceedings against 
Dissenters charged with being present at Religious Exercises other 
than those appointed by the Church of England, " constituting a body 
of evidences of the highest interest and importance to the historian of 
Anglican Nonconformity in London." 

7. — Sacramental Certificates. Many thousands of certificates 
from 167 1 to 1825, containing the names and autographs of very 
many eminent Englishmen, and of Clergy of the London Parishes.. 

8. — Justices' Certificates of Non-Jurors, Recusants, &c., 
from 1673, giving the names, professions, trades, places of abode, &c., 
of those who were summoned and appeared, or failed to appear, of 
those who subscribed the Rolls or refused to do so, &c. 

g. — Hearth and Stove Tax Accounts, 1664, a complete set, "of 
great importance to the genealogist." 

10. — List of Freeholders liable to serve on Juries in the various 
parishes and places of the County, in fifteen folio volumes, continuous 
from 1696 to 1789 ; Commissions of the Peace, &c., 1687 to 1785; 
Register of the Estates of Justices, 1746 to 1820 ; &c., &c. 

II. — Orders of Council concerning the Plague, 1661 to 
1666. This Book also contains Lists of Recusants, Persons fined for 
" prophane language,'' cursing and swearing, &c. 

12. — Orders of Court made at Quarter Sessions from 1716. 
A series full of interesting information of the proceedings of the 
Justices touching the government of the County in its various depart- 
ments. 

13. — Land Tax Accounts. A series extending from 1767 to 1833. 
Most useful in pedigree inquiries. 

14. — Miscellanea. Lists of Alehouses at various periods, the 
earliest being 1552 ; Lists bf Butchers' Recognisances against selling 



s 

meat in Lent, 1631 ; Books and Contracts relating to County Works, 
e.g., Bridges, Prisons, the New Sessions House, Clerkenwdl, the Pav- 
ing of the Hay market, Maintenance of the Streets, &c., &c., from 
George I. ; Books relating to the Militia, i7S7toi8i6; and many others. 

The whole forming (in Mr. Jeaffreson's words) " A body of Muni- 
ments which would enable a zealous and competent antiquary to 
produce an adequate history of the County, from Elizabeth to 
Victoria." 

The completeness and rapidity with which the object for which the 
Middlesex County Record Society is formed can- be carried out 
must of course depend on the number of subscribers and the amount 
of their contributions. 

It is hoped that a sufficient number of Subscribers will be secured 
to allow the production of one or two volumes yearly, and that the 
whole may be finished in five years. Each volume will be complete in 
itself, as far as possible, and will be fully indexed. 

The rate of an ordinary Single Subscription is fixed at One Guinea 
annually, payable on the 1st January in each year, and entitling the 
subscriber to the publications of that year ; but there is every 
encouragement to hope that in so enlightened and wealthy a con- 
stituency there will be found many (some have already come forward) 
who will be willing to give donations of larger amount in order that the 
work may be as thorough as possible. 

The Subscription List will therefore be arranged under two heads ; 
one of Ordinary Subscribers of One Guinea annually for five years, 
and another of Donors to what maybe called "The Editing Fund." 
Any contribution to this fund of Five Guineas and upwards will be 
held to include a subscription for five years, and will entitle the donor 
to a copy of every publication issued during that period. 
' N.B. — No volume will be supplied to any subscriber whose subscription 
for the year is unpaid, and no volume will be sold to any bitt a subscriber, 
except at a largely advanced price. 

The Honorary Treasurer, or Honorary Secretaries, will be happy to 
furnish any information, or to receive the Names of Donors or Sub- 
scribers. 

February, 1886. 



DONORS. 



Adams, B. H. Esq. (the late) 
Barnard, Herbert, Esq., F.S.A, 
Barter, Henry, Esq. . . . 
Bashford, W. C. L., Esq. . 
Beal, E. W., Esq. . . . 
Brooking, J. S., Esq. (the late) 
Burt, George, Esq. . . 
Cecil, The Lord Eustace, M.P, 
Clode, Charles M., Esq., C.B, 

F.S.A 

Cockayne, G. E., Esq., F.S.A, 

Norroy King of Anns . 
Cocks, Thos. Somers, Esq. . 
Coope, O. E., Esq., M.P. . 
Cundy, Chas. F., Esq. . . 
Devonshire, The Duke of, K.G. 
Ebury, Lord .... 
Enfield, Viscount, Lord Lieut, 

and Custos Rotulorum , 
Fletcher, J. S., Esq. . . , 
Finnis, G. Carruthers, Esq. 
France, John, Esq., F.S.A. 
Gadesden, A. W., Esq., F.S.A. 
Goldsmiths' Company, The . 
Gwynne, J. E. A., Esq., F.S.A, 
Hanson, Aldn. Sir Reginald. 

M.A., F.S.A 

Hardy, W. J., Esq., F.S.A. 
Harrison, William, Esq. . . 
Hill, Charles, Esq., F.S.A. 

(also a Subscriber) . . 
Hillingdon, Rt. Hon. Lord 

Homan, E., Esq 

Hughes-Hughes, W., Esq. . 
James, Francis, Esq., F.S.A, 
Jersey, The Earl of . . . 
Kennard, Stephen, Esq. . . 
Layton, Tho., Esq., F.S.A. 

Lee, Heniy, Esq 

Lincoln's Inn, The Hon. Society 

of 

Lord Mayor, The late (Aldn, 

Nottage) 

Lucas, Thomas, Esq. ... 
Lusk, Alderman Sir Andrew, 

Bart, M.P 



£ 
5 
5 
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5 

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5 5 



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£ s. d. 

Lyall, Charles, Esq 5 5° 

Mackintosh, G. G., Esq. ..55° 
Manning, H. E. Cardinal ..55° 
Marshall, James, Esq. ... 55° 
Maryon-Wilson, Sir Spencer, 

Bart lo o o 

Miller, Alexander E., Esq., 

QC 5 S o 

Milman, Lieut. -General Bryan, 

C.B 5 5° 

Morley, Captain F. B. . . . 5 5 o 
Morley, Samuel, Esq. . . . lo o o 
Morris, Edward R., Esq. ..55° 

Ness, James, Esq 5 5° 

Nicholson, Richard, Esq. . . 50 o o 
Nicholson, Cornelius, Esq. , 

F.S.A 220 

Noble, John, Esq 5 5° 

Noel, The Honble. Henry L. . 550 

Pixley, Stewart, Esq 5 5° 

Pownall, John Fish, Esq. . . 10 10 o 

Price, J. B., Esq 5 5 o 

Ryder, The Honble. H. Dudley 550 
Salomons, Sir David, Bart. ..550 
Salters' Company, The ...550 
Shadwell, Charles Lancelot, 

Esq 5 5° 

Stewart, J. A. Shaw, Esq. ..550 
Smith, B. Woodd, Esq. ... 26 5 o 
Tyler, Charles, Esq. ....550 

Tyler, Sir James 21 o o 

Walford, Cornelius, Esq. ,F. S. A. 

(the late) 5 5° 

Waterlow, W. Blandford, Esq. 5 5 o 
Watney, John, Esq., F.S.A. .550 
Webb, Captain J. Sidney • ■ 5 5 o 
Westminster, The Duke of, 

KG 10 o o 

Whitaker, Joseph, Esq., F.S.A. 5 5 o 
Wigram, W. Knox, Esq. (the 

late) 550 

Wood, R. H., Esq , F.S.A. . 5 5 o 
Wood, Thomas, Esq., of Little- 

'°" 550 

Wright, Charles, Esq. ■ • . 5 5 o 



SUBSCRIBING MEMBERS 



(of One Guinea Annually for Five Years). 



Antrobus, E. E., Esq., F.S.A. 
Ashby, John, Esq. 
Atkinson, H. J., Esq. 
Bayley, Edmund K., Esq. 
Bickerstaff, W. M., Esq. 
Bodkin, W. P., Esq. 
Bowker, Henry, Esq., Junr. 
Brandon, Henry, Esq. 
Broolce, Thos., Esq., F.S.A. 
Burgess, Philip B. , Esq. 
Fiennes, The Hon. J. F. T. W. 
Ford, John W., Esq. 
Gibbons, Sir John, Bart. 
Gibbs, Henry Hucks, Esq. 
Glossop, F. H. N., Esq. (the late) 
Gordon, Sir H. W., K.C.B. 
Goslett, Alfred, Esq. 
Gotto, E., Esq. 

Gray's Inn, The Honble. Society of 
Grosvenor, The Hon. Algernon H. 
Guildhall Library, The 
Hailstone, Edward, Esq., F.S.A. 
Hales, Professor John W. 
Halswell, H. B., Esq. 



Hamilton, Lord George, M. P. 

Hill, Chas., Esq., F.S.A. (also a Donor) 

Hoare, Joseph, Esq. (the late) 

Hogarth, J. R., Esq. 

Inner Temple, The Hon. Society of the 

Marshall, George W., Esq., LL.D., 

F.S.A. 
Martineau, P. M., Esq. 
Miller, G. T., Esq. 
Northampton, The Marquis of 
Palliser, Captain Arthur 
Pim, Rear-Admiral Bedford 
Pownall, H. H., Esq. 
Scadding, Walter, Esq. 
Scott, Sir David Sibbald, Bart., F.S.A. 

(the late) 
Stapylton, H. E. C, Esq. 
Trehurst, John, Esq. 
Wheatley, H. B., Esq., F.S.A. 
Woodd, Charles H, Lardner, Esq. 
Woodd, R. Ballard, Esq. 
Woods, F. A., Esq. 
Wyatt, Sir W. H. 
Young, Francis, Esq. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY RECORDS. 



VOLUME I. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY RECORDS 



VOLUME I. 

INDICTMENTS, CORONERS' INQUESTS -POST -MORTEM 
AND RECOGNIZANCES FROM 3 EDWARD VI. TO 
THE END OF THE REIGN OF QUEEN ELIZABETH. 



EDITED BY 

JOHN CORDY JEAFFRESON 

B A. OXON., AND BARRISTER-AT-LAW OF LINCOLN'S INN 



WITH AN INDEX by A. T. WATSON 




X / 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE MIDDLESEX COUNTY RECORDS SOCIETY 

AT THE CLERKENWELL SESSIONS HOUSE 
£ V 






'i 'J t. 



l\,3S^o^9-' 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY WOODFALL AND KINDER, 

MILFORD LANE, STRAND, W.C- 



EDITOR'S PREFACE. 



I.- Measures taken for the re-arrangement of the Middlesex Manuscripts, 
from October, 1882, to July, 1884. — On the 26th of October, 1882, the 
Court of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of 
Middlesex, in Quarter Session assembleci, appointed a Special Com- 
mittee to " consider and report to the Court whether any and, if any, 
what better accommodation can be provided for the old Records of 
the County ; and as to the best means of sorting them with a view to 
the preparation of an Index or Calendar." This Committee consisted 
of the following magistrates of the county, — Captain Morley (the 
Chairman of the Court), Sir W. H. Wyatt, Mr. B. H. Adams, Lord 
Alfred Churchill, the Hon. J. F. T. W. Fiennes, Mr. J. F. France, the 
Hon. H. L. Noel, Mr. J. F. Pownall, the late Mr. B. Sharpe, and Mr. 
Basil Woodd Smith. 

By this Committee it was decided that the county-records lying at 
Westminster should be moved to Clerkenwell, so that all the ancient 
muniments of Middlesex should be brought into a single collection, 
lying at what may be termed the sessional head-quarters of the metro- 
politan county. Through the action of the same Committee, the 
multifarious writings, thus put together, have been relieved of dirt and 
mould, reduced as nearly as possible to chronological order, sorted, 
labelled, and exactly catalogued. They have been recovered from 
the confusion into which the older records seem to have been falling 
so far back as the time of William the Third, when Mr. Harcourt, the 
Clerk of the Peace for the County, removed them " to his country 
house in Holborne," and there kept them for a considerable period, in 
curious disregard of peremptory orders by the Court for their restora- 
tion to the Sessions House. 

The task of recovering the two collections from confusion, and 
making them into one well-digested, accurately labelled, and exactly 
catalogued body of sessional muniments was executed by Mr. A. T. 
Watson, one of the very few masters of his particular craft in the whole 
country, to whom so great and important a piece of work could have 
been safely entrusted. That the Middlesexmagistrates put no exces- 

b 



xviii editor's PREFACE. 

sive confidence in Mr. Watson's ability to do what they required to be 
done appears from the present state of the manuscripts. Whilst this 
perfect craftsman was at work on the records, the county-architect made 
the new Muniment Room at the Clerkenwell Sessions House, which 
should be visited by persons who wish to know what such a chamber 
ought to be, in respect to dimensions, light, temperature, ventilation 
and furniture. 

When it is said that the Middlesex Manuscripts, now resting in this 
room under all the conditions most favourable for their safety and for 
the maintenance of their present orderliness, comprise io,ri8 volumes, 
and 4,916 rolls or bundles (containing, at a rough but moderate com- 
putation, 500,000 documents), it is needless to add that all this work 
was not accomplished in a few weeks. It took all the longer, because 
Mr. Watson could work on the records only in time before or after his 
daily hours of labour at the Record Office. The work, however, went 
on so regularly and steadily under the Committee's sympathetic and 
vigilant surveillance, that on the 24th July, 1884, the Honorary 
Secretary of the Committee could inform his Fellow-Justices of the 
Peace, in Quarter Session assembled, that the archives of the county 
were in perfect order. 

II. Middlesex County Record Society. — This good work having been 
accomplished, it appeared to the magistrates who had been members 
of the late Records Committee, and to several of the Justices of the 
Peace, who without being members of the committee had watched its 
labours with interest and approval, that steps should be taken to exhibit 
in a series of printed calendars the purport and chief particulars of the 
more noteworthy manuscripts of the collection, on whose restoration 
and re-arrangement so much labour had been expended. The imme- 
diate result of this sentiment was the institution of the Middlesex 
County Record Society, whose aims and general scheme of action are 
set forth in a prospectus at the opening of this volume. Till the 
records shall have been examined more thoroughly in all their pei-iods, 
it will be impossible to form a precise estimate of the time and the 
number of volumes requisite for the perfect editorial exhibition of all 
their matters of historic value. But a general survey of the entire 
body of MSS., and the particular examination of the writings of certain 
periods, justify an opinion that the whole work may be accomplished 
in ten such volumes as the present, and within five years from the 
publication of the first of the calendars. 

On this general view of the magnitude and requirements of the 
undertaking, the council of the Middlesex RecordSociety hav e deter- 
mined to publish this book and another volume of the same size in the 
course of the present year, and, in case the subscriptions of the public 



editor's preface. xix 

should be adequate to the charges of the enterprise, to produce two 
such calendars yearly, till the purpose of the Society shall be achieved. 
The two publications, edited for the Society by the present writer, will 
deal with the records of the earliest of the three most important periods 
of the Middlesex MSS., viz., with the writings from the third year of 
Edward the Sixth to the end of James the First's reign. After dealing 
with the records of this period, the Society may perhaps edit the notable 
MSS. of the Restoration period, which are rich in evidences touching 
the Great Plague, the Great Fire of London, the political prosecutions 
of Charles the Second's reign, and the proceedings against Noncon- 
formists. It may then appear well to the Society to deal with the 
books, sessions-files and multifarious rolls of the Jacobite period. The 
manipulation of the less interesting, though valuable, writings of the 
interlying periods might be deferred till the evidences of highest 
moment have received editorial attention. 

III. Chief Purpose of this Introduction. — In dealing with what 
remains of the sessions-rolls alias rolled sessions-files, that grew upon 
the hands of successive Custodes Rotulorum for Middlesex in the later 
half of our Tudor period, I have been no less thoughtful for the needs 
of students, who may search this volume for matters likely to aid them 
in undertakings of literary research, than for the entertainment of the 
far larger number of persons who will, it is hoped, be moved by mere 
desire for diversion to glance, at the pages of a calendar, that has not 
been produced without labour and anxious vigilance. But this preface 
will be written less for the advantage of the special scholars who are 
familiar with old official writings, than for the information of readers 
who have only the slightest acquaintance, or no acquaintance whatever, 
with the kind of literary material on which I have been operating. 
Its chief purpose will be accomplished, should it enable "the geneial 
reader " to apprehend the shape, character, texture, diction and aspect 
of the records, which I have tried to manipulate into entertaining 
literature, and also to apprehend the fashion and construction of the 
packets, that afford us so considerable a body of evidence respecting 
the religious life and lighter humours, as well as the criminal restless- 
ness and darker passions of Shakespeare's London. 

IV. Purpose of the present Volume. — From the third year of Edward 
the Sixth, in which the Middlesex MSS. begin, to the fifth year of James 
the First, in which year the oldest book of the collection was begun, the 
Clerkenwell evidences of the proceedings of the Justices of the Peace 
for the metropolitan county are preserved in an imperfect series of 
more or less fragmentary sessions-files ; and it is the purpose of the 
present volume to exhibit the purport and principal particulars of all 
the noteworthy documents contained in these files, from their com- 

b 2 



XX editor's preface. 

mencement in Edward's time to the close of Elizabeth's reign. Of 
these files, twenty-six came into existence in Edward's reign, sixty-eight 
during the regnal period of Mary Tudor, and three hundred and 
eighteen whilst Elizabeth wore the crown ; and the several documents 
of these four hundred and twelve files may, in the present fragmentary 
state of the packets, be computed as numbering thirty thousand. With 
the exception of the Licensed Victuallers' Recognizances Roll temp. 
Ed. VI., the rolls dealt with in this work are files, that from being 
rolled into cylindrical packets have come to be designated respectively, — 

{a.) Gaol Delivery Rolls, 

{b.) General Session of Peace Rolls, 

(c.) Special Session of Oyer and Terminer Rolls, 

(d.) Inquest Rolls, or 

{e.) Composite Rolls. 

V. Gaol Delivery Rolls. — Consisting chiefly of indictments and 
recognizances, but comprising documents of divers other kinds, such 
as precepts of Venire Facias, writs of Capias, lists of jurors, jury-panels, 
and sometimes writs of Supersedeas and memoranda of Proclamations, 
each of the uninjured gaol-delivery rolls, put together after Elizabeth's 
fourth regnal year, may be described as the perfect collection of the 
documents that were used at, or furthered the business of, the 
particular session of gaol-delivery named upon its wrapper. But this 
description would be inappropriate to the earlier gaol-delivery files, 
which are by no means so bulky as the gaol-delivery files of the sub- 
sequent period, and contain only a small proportion of the indictments 
on which culprits were arraigned at the successive assizes, to which the 
packets respectively pertain. For the present it is enough to observe 
that the comparative slightness of these earliest gaol-delivery files was 
less due to the lightness of their calendars, than to what may be called 
the clerical arrangement of the indictments. How so few of the 
indictments appear in the earlier gaol-delivery files, to which they 
may be said to pertain, is a question that will be answered by what 
will be said about inquest-rolls in a later section of this preface. 

VI. General Session of Peace Rolls. — Like the Justices of the Peace 
of other counties, the Justices of the Peace for Middlesex had for 
some years been required by 2 Henry V. c. 4, in accordance with pre- 
vious ordinances, to " make their sessions four times by the year ; that 
is to say, in the first week after the Feast of St. Michael, and 
in the first week after the Epiphany, and in the first week 
after the close of Easter, and in the first week after the Translation of 
St. Thomas the Martyr, and more often if need be," when reasons 
appeared -why they should be exempted from this obligation, and the 



editor's preface. xxi 

people of the county be relieved of the inconvenience and bootless 
trouble of attending so many General Sessions of the Peace in each 
year. It was observed that, owing to the frequency of the Newgate 
gaol-deliveries, the metropolitan county was in less need than any other 
shire of General Sessions of the Peace, for the repression of crime 
and the correction of evil-doers. Indeed, the business of a General 
Session of the Peace for the county was sometimes so slight, as to 
make it obvious the court was held only for the avoidance of the 
penalty for neglecting to hold it. At the same time, as all the King's 
high courts sate continually in Middlesex during the four terms of the 
year, and the commons of the county were bound to attend upon these 
courts as jurors, it was manifest that the freeholders of the shire were, 
in respect to a particular service, far more heavily burdened than the 
freeholders of other counties. Under these circumstances, for the 
removal of a cause of reasonable complaint, it was ordained by Statute 
14 Henry VI. c. 4, " That the Justices of the Peace which now are, and 
all other hereafter for the time being, in the said County of Middlesex, 
shall be clearly discharged of the said penalty, by authority of the said 
Parliament from henceforth, the Court of the King's Bench being set 
in the said County of Middlesex. Provided always, that the said 
Justices of the Peace of the said County of Middlesex, for the time 
being, keep, observe, and execute the Court of the Sessions of the 
Peace, two times in the year at the least, and more often if need be, 
for any riot, or forcible entry made within the same County of 
Middlesex, and that upon the pain and forfeiture of such sums as be 
for that ordained by any law made before this time ; to the end and 
intent that the said Commons and Inhabitants of the said County of 
Middlesex be not inforced nor compelled to appear before the Justices 
of the Peace of the same County for the time being, but at such time 
which shall seem by the discretions of the same Justices of Peace 
necessary and needful." 

Thus exonerated from holding what are ordinarily called Quarter 
Sessions, provided they held a court of General Session of the Peace 
at least twice in the year, and such other additional sessions of the 
Peace as the state and affairs of the county should seem to require, 
the Middlesex magistrates availed themselves of the peculiar exemption, 
so that for a long series of years their county had no more than two 
courts of General Session of the Peace in each year. The General 
Session of Peace rolls, pertaining to sessions held in the period covered 
by the ensuing calendar, are numerous ; it seldom occurs that a year's 
bundle of Elizabethan files fails to afford at least a fragment of a 
General Session of Peace file ; in the files pertaining to the majority 
of Elizabeth's years, two fairly perfect files of this particular kind are 



XXll EDITOR S PREFACE. 

preserved in each yearly bundle ; but no yearly bundle contains more 
than two General Session of Peace files. It is also noteworthy that all 
the rolls of this particular kind relate to sessions that were held either 
in the first week after Michaelmas or in the first week after the close 
of Easter. Throughout the imperfect series of sessional files one 
comes on no single lot of documents relating to a general session 
held in the first week after Epiphany or in the first week after the day 
of St. Thomas the Martyr. From this absence of Epiphany Session 
files and Midsummer Session files, and this presence of Michaelmas 
Session and Easter Session files, one may infer without misgiving that, 
throughout the period covered by this book, only two General Sessions 
of the Peace were held in Middlesex in the course of the year, and 
that those two were held just after Michaelmas and Easter. And it 
may be assumed, though with less confidence, that this practice of the 
Middlesex magistrates from the middle of the sixteenth to the beginning 
of the seventeenth century (and to a much later time) was the mere 
continuation of a practice that was begun in the fourteenth year of 
Henry the Sixth, and persisted in from that time. 

Were it not that the General Session of the Peace rolls comprise 
the sheriff's lists of the Bailiffs and Sub-bailiffs and the High and 
Petty Constables of the shire (documents never found in other files) 
whilst the Gaol-Delivery rolls comprise the Coroners' Inquests, Writs 
of Supersedeas and separate Memoranda of Proclamations &c. (docu- 
ments never found in the Sessions of Peace rolls), the general account 
given on a previous page of the usual contents of the Gaol-Delivery 
rolls would serve as a general description of the rolls to which this 
section of the present introduction relates. Like a Gaol-Delivery 
file, a General Session of Peace file consists chiefly of writs of 
" Venire Facias," for the production of jurors, writs of " Capias," lists of 
jurors, jury-panels, recognizances and indictments. Of course the indict- 
ments preserved in, the General Session of Peace files are, for the 
most part, indictments for petty offences, whilst the indictments pre- 
served in the Gaol-Delivery files are, for the most part, indictments for 
felonies. The General Session of Peace rolls, however, sometimes 
comprise indictments for the most heinous crimes. Not that such 
grave matters were determined by mere Justices of the Peace, who after 
taking such indictments and submitting them to the inquisition of the 
grand jury, took no further action in respect to them. On being found 
" true " at General Sessions of the Peace, these graver indictments were 
in due course transmitted by the Clerk of the Peace to the Justice 
Hall in the Old Bailey, where they were used for the arraignment of 
culprits, without being again submitted to the preliminary inquest. 
The same was the case with indictments taken at those Sessions of 



editor's preface. xxiii 

Peace that were known to Elizabethan Londoners as "Sessions of 
Enquiry." 

VII. Special Session of Oyer and Terminer Rolls. — Consisting some- 
times of a single indictment against a single individual, with a writ of 
" Venire Facias," a list of jurors and a jury-panel,, and rarely contain- 
ing more than three or four indictments against three or four persons, 
these particular sessional files, even when they are perfect, may be 
recognized at a glance by the slightness which distinguishes them from 
the other rolls. That so few of these rolls are found in any condition, 
and that so considerable a proportion of those that have come down to 
us are mere remnants, is no doubt chiefly referable to their original 
slightness, which rendered them less able than the larger packets to 
endure the violence, and resist the water, that wrought so much injury 
to the outer membranes of the stoutest and most compact of the Middle- 
sex Sessions' rolls. That the havoc wrought amongst these especially 
interesting packets by moisture and hard usage is to be regretted, will 
be admitted by the reader who examines (vide pp. 111-113) the records 
of the arraignments of the Catholic priest Thomas Metham, and the 
Catholic gentlewomen, Margery Anderson, Elizabeth Barram, and Lady 
Brome, preserved in a substantial though imperfect file, whose contents 
may well cause the student to ask whether he has lost many no less 
important writings through the decay of the Oyer and Terminer rolls, 
of which nothing remains but an empty wrapper or a list of jurors. 

VIII. Inquest Rolls. — To apprehend the nature and historic interest 
of these rolls, readers should liberate themselves from the general 
notion (which is entertained at the present time even by criminal 
lawyers) that the practice of submitting all the indictments dealt 
with at acriminal assize to the grand jury after the opening of the 
commission of the same assize was no less universal in former, than 
it is at the present, time. Three centuries since it was, at least 
in Middlesex, more usual for the indictments on which culprits were 
arraigned at a criminal assize to be submitted to the preliminary inqui- 
sition and found true, before than after the opening of the assize. And 
this usage, which prevailed in ancient time throughout the kingdom, 
was maintained in Middlesex to a time so recent, that it would be no 
bold figure to speak of it as yesterday. 

During the particular period covered by this volume, whilst holding 
only two General Sessions of the Peace in the course of each year, the 
Middlesex magistrates, in the exercise of their power to hold as many 
sessions as should appear needful, used to hold in every year several 
sessions for the preliminary examination of the evidence against per- 
sons charged with felony, at which sessions they not only took general 
examinations of the prisoners, before admitting them to bailment or 



xxiv EDITOR'S PREFACE. 

mainprise, in accordance with Statute i & 2 Philip and Mary, c. 13, and 
in accordance with practice anterior to that statute, but also submitted 
formal bills of indictment against the same persons to the inquisition 
of the grand jury, before exercising their discretion in respect to the 
bailment or mainprise of the offenders. Whether any other business 
was transacted at these sessions does not appear from the files ; but the 
evidence of the files is conclusive that the chief, if not the only, 
purpose of these sessions (styled " Sessiones ad inquirendum " in many 
of the recognizances, and " Sessions of Inquiry " in the English foot- 
notes to or endorsements of the same recognizances) was to take in- 
quest of indictments, viz., to submit indictments to the Grand Jury, 
in order that they should be found True Bills or Not True Bills. 

Held now and then at Westminster, and more often at the Manor of 
Finsbury, these Sessions of Inquiry were held most often at the Castle 
in St. John's Street, — the locality that has remained from Tudor time 
the head-quarters of Middlesex for sessional business, though in the 
sixteenth century, and long afterwards, it was the exception for a 
General Session of the Peace for Middlesex to be held anywhere but 
in Westminster. Sometimes these sessions for taking indictments were 
held of St. John's Street, whilst Judges of Assize were making a gaol- 
delivery at Newgate, in which case the bills found true at them were 
transmitted promptly to the Justice Hall in the Old Bailey. But 
sometimes they were held before the opening of the commission at the 
Justice Hall, in which case the inquisitions taken by the Grand Jury 
before the Justices of the Peace may be said to have been taken in 
anticipation of, and preparation for, the next session of gaol-delivery. 
It is noteworthy that, although it must have been familiar to all 
Elizabethan Londoners, and commonly used by them in their ordinary 
talk, the term "Session of Inquiry" seems to have fallen not only out 
of use but out of memory, before Jacob compiled his dictionary of 
legal terms in the eighteenth century. Had he known aught of the 
once familiar designation, he would not have failed to notice it. 

The bills of indictment, thus taken and found true at one of these 
sessions, were put on a file, together with the precept of " Venire 
Facias," the jury-panel, and sometimes a few recognizances, and made 
into a roll. Sometimes the last thing to be put on the file was a 
parchment, setting forth the date and place of the Inquisition, together 
with the names of the Justices before whom, and the names of the 
jurors on whose oath, the inquisition was taken ; the names of the jurors 
being followed, at the foot of the certificate, by these words : " Qui 
dicunt super sacramentum suum quod omnes bilk huic Inquisidoni annex- 
ate sunt wri?"=Who say that all the bills annexed to this Inquisition 
are true. Each roll was described on its wrapper with corresponding 



editor's preface. XXV 

words, beginning with " Inquisicio capta apud . . . ." The indict- 
ments for felony, taken and found at General Sessions of the Peace, 
were in the same manner filed and made up into a roll, before their 
transmission from Westminster to the Old Bailey. 

Throughout Mary's reign, and also in the opening years of Eliza- 
beth's reign, these Inquest Rolls were preserved in the form given to 
them, on their transmission to the Old Bailey. Instead of being re- 
filed with the other documents of the gaol-delivery to which they per- 
tained, the documents of each of these rolls were put away in the 
separate rolled packet into which they had been made at Session of 
Inquiry. So long as this was the Clerk of the Peace's practice, the 
Gaol-Delivery Rolls were necessarily light and slender things. But 
after Elizabeth's fourtl^ year the searcher of the Middlesex Manu- 
scripts comes upon no more of these Inquest Rolls ; not because 
Sessions of Inquiry were discontinued, but because the documents of 
the Inquest Rolls were henceforth transferred to the file of their proper 
gaol-delivery roll ; — a change of clerical practice that at once gave 
the gaol-delivery rolls a more impressive and weighty appearance. 

In taking inquest of indictments for felony at Sessions of the Peace, 
with the purpose of transmitting them to the Assizes, the Justices of 
the Peace for Middlesex in the sixteenth century only took the course 
of Justices in other counties. But the case of Rex v. Wetherell {vide 
" Russell and Ryan's Crown Cases," p. 381) indicates how completely 
this whilom familiar practice had in 181 9 passed out of general usage, 
though it was still maintained in Middlesex. Two bills of indictment 
had been found against John Wetherell, at the North Riding of York- 
shire Quarter Sessions of the Peace, for escaping, and at the same 
time aiding a fellow-prisoner to escape, from the Northallerton house 
of correction ; and John Wetherell had been transmitted to York to 
be tried at the Lent Assizes, 1819, for these two offences, on the two 
several indictments so found at quarter-sessions ; when so able a Judge 
as Mr. Baron Wood refused to try the prisoner on the following 
grounds : — (i) That he had never tried an indictment found at quarter- 
sessions, unless it had been removed by certiorari in the King's 
Bench, and sent thence to Assizes for trial; (2) That serious incon- 
venience and labour would be thrown on the Commission of Gaol 
Delivery, if Justices of the Peace could at their discretion thus transmit 
prisoners to the Assizes for trial, when the same Justices were them- 
selves competent to deal with them ; and (3) That there ought to have 
been a new indictment preferred against John Wetherell before the 
grand jury of the county and found by them. In the ensuing Easter 
Term the Judges were of opinion that the prisoner should have been 
tried at the Assizes upon the indictments found at the sessions. 



xxvi editor's preface. 

It was strange that so good a lawyer made so considerable a mistake- 
It would have been far more strange had any other opinion been 
given by the Judges, sitting in Middlesex, where it was the practice of 
Justices of the Peace to take indictments for felony at sessions, and on 
their being returned into court by the Grand Jury to transmit them to 
the Old Bailey, up to the time of the creation of the Central Criminal 
Court, — a Court established under a statute (4, 5 William IV. c. 36), 
by whose 19th section the power of finding true bills and transmitting 
them to the Old Bailey was preserved to the Middlesex Quarter 
Sessions. Mr. Wright, the present Keeper of the Clerkenwell Sessions 
House — a gentleman enjoying a clear memory in his green and vigorous 
old age — remembers, how in his boyhood, soon after his admission to 
his first appointment in the Sessions House, he was sent from Clerken- 
well to the Old Bailey court-house with a file of indictments that had 
just before been found "true bills" by the grand jurors sitting at 
Clerkenwell.* 

IX. Composite Rolls. — The peculiarity of- the rolled files, to which I 
venture to assign this designation, is that, whilst holding the documents 
of a single gaol-delivery, each of them preserves also the documents of 
a session of the peace. But, though they are Sessions of Peace Rolls 
no less than Gaol-Delivery Rolls, they were rated and described as 
gaol-delivery rolls by the successive clerks who filed their various 
documents and endorsed their wrappers. There is indeed an excep- 
tion to this clerical practice. The rolls of Elizabeth's first year com- 
prise a file, that is particularly declared to be at the same time a 
General Session of Peace roll and a Gaol-Delivery roll by its endorse- 
ment, " Generalis Sessio Pacis .... Sancti Michaelis, &c., &c. 
. . . unacum .... Deliberacione Gaole de Newgate .... 
7 Oct. I Eliz." But all the subsequent rolls of this composite sort 
are declared to be Gaol-Delivery packets, no reference being made 
in the large lettering of their endorsements to the session-of-peace 
documents ; and in my frequent references in the ensuing calendar 
to these composite packets, I have thought it right to adhere to the 
terms of their descriptive endorsements. When the document to 
which it ^elates is not "a broken file," each entry of the calendar ends 
with an indicatory reference to the particular rolled packet in which 
the document may be found ; and a chief, though not the only, pur- 

* Speaking of the Middlesex and Westminster Sessions, Ryland (vide " Crown 
Circuit Companion "), says: "At both the last-mentioned sessions, indictments are 
preferred for felony, which, when returned by the grand jury into Court, are, by the 
respective Clerks of the Peace, transmitted to the Sessions House in the Old Bailey, 
where the Sessions of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery for the City of 
London and County of Middlesex are also holden eight times in the year in the same 
weeks in which the Sessions are held at the new Sessions House. '' 



editor's preface. xxvil 

pose of each indicatory reference being to guide searchers to a par- 
ticular collection of writings, I could not do otherwise than make it 
correspond with the descriptive endorsement of the file thus referred 
to. Indicatory reference (by the capital letters G. D. R. and a date) 
is therefore now and then made in the ensuing calendar to a roll, that 
besides being a gaol-delivery roll is a session-of-peace roll. Readers 
therefore must not assume hastily that every indictment, thus described 
as lying in a Gaol-Delivery Roll, came under the cognizance of the 
commissioners of a Newgate gaol-delivery, as it may have been deter- 
mined by Justices of the Peace, instead of having been transmitted 
to the Old Bailey. In respect to the indictments for felony, and more 
serious misdemeanours, lying in these composite rolls, it may of course 
be assumed that they were Old Bailey matters. On the other hand, 
though the Cotnmissioners of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery 
sometimes dealt with charges of petty larceny, common vagrancy, and 
trivial misdemeanours, the ipajority of the true bills for ordinary tres- 
passes and other insignificant offences, lying in these several collections 
of session-of-peace unacum gaol-delivery records, may be regarded as 
havmg been dealt with from first to last by the Justices of the Peace, 
who were manifestly competent to proceed to judgment in respect to 
them. 

IX. The Construction of these Sessions-Rolls. — All these various kinds 
of sessions-rolls are constructed in the same way ; and, without being 
devoid of concern for the dignity of the archives committed to my 
editorial authority, I must admit, that it is a way which of itself justifies 
some of our best masters and connoisseurs of old manuscripts in 
speaking of sessions-rolls as sessions-bundles, and even in maintaining 
that " rolls " should not be used for the description of a number of 
documentary collections, which are wanting in prime characteristics of 
the particular sort of records, to which alone the word is strictly appli- 
cable. It must be conceded that the precisians are right on this point, 
and that persons who speak of mere rolled files as rolls are barely 
justified by custom in their free use of an ancient term. 

Strictly speaking, the collection of separate documents, thus called 
a session's-roU, is nothing more than a file of miscellaneous writings 
done up roll-wise, i.e., done up Ln a fashion that gives it the outward 
show of a roll. A roll proper may consist of a single piece of vellum, 
parchment, paper, or other material, or it may be made of any number 
of pieces ; but when it is made of more than one piece, it is necessary 
that the pieces should be made into one uniform volume. The 
membranes, strips or pieces may be put together like the leaves of a 
book, and secured with stitches or a single ligament, in which case the 
roll, on beiijg untied, and laid upon a table, has the look of an oblong 



xxviii editor's preface. 

book. Or they may be stitched together " tandem-fashion," so that, 
on being opened and displayed at full length, the roll resembles a 
broad riband. The documents making up a Session's-roll are never 
stitched together, but are held in contiguity by a file of vellum, parch- 
ment, or hempen string, that is usually passed through the upper 
corner of the left-hand margin of each of the documents, so that no 
injury is done to the written words either by the file or by the filing 
needle. Sometimes, however, the file passes through the body of the 
documents, alike to the detriment of the writings and to the incon- 
venience of those who have occasion to search them. Rolls that set 
forth uniformly the acts and proceedings of Sessions of Peace or Gaol- 
Delivery are records to wliich " roll " is strictly applicable ; but no such 
rolls appear amongst the Clerkenwell MSS. of the sixteenth century. 

The documents, thus put together into the various kinds of rolled 
session-files, comprise recognizances, indictments (in Middlesex, only 
those of the indictments that were found to be " true bills "), writs of 
" Venire Facias " and " Capias," now and then writs of " Supersedeas," 
lists of good and loyal men returned to serve on juries, jury-panels, 
coroners' inquisitions-post-mortem for cause of death, sheriffs' returns 
of coroners, bailiffs, constables and other officers, lists and calendars of 
prisoners, memoranda' and incidental writings. These documents 
necessarily differ in magnitude ; but two-thirds of the documents of an 
ordinary Elizabethan session-roll are narrow parchments, measuring 
some twelve or fourteen inches from left to right by from one to three 
or four inches from the upper to the bottom edge of the material. 
Some of the parchments are of course larger. For instance, the 
sheriffs' lists of officers measure some two or three feet by two or three 
inches ; the lengthier indictments are often as deep as they are broad ; 
whilst the coroners' lengthier inquisitions and the calendars of prisoners 
are of still larger dimensions. 

In filing the documents of a Newgate gaol-delivery file, the Elizabethan 
Clerk of the Peace, either with his own hands or with the hands of one 
of his clerical servants, did his work in the following manner. The first 
document to be filed was the stoutest and deepest of the parchments. 
Usually it was the calendar of the recently delivered prisoners. But 
sometimes choice was made of a more than usually expansive inquisi- 
tion, that would prove a better wrapper than the calendar. Before 
filing this chosen parchment, the clerk put upon it a carefully written 
endorsement, for the sufficient outward description of the assemblage 
of writings, of which it would be the envelope, — an endorsement open- 
ing with " Midd' : Deliberacio Gaole de Newgate," and closing with 
the date of the day, month, and regnal year of the particular gaol- 
delivery. The next things to be filed were the coroners' inquisitions 



EDITORS PREFACE. xxix 

for cause of death, some of which had been used in draughting indict- 
ments for murder and manslaughter, whilst others of them had some- 
times been themselves submitted to the grand jury, endorsed " Billa 
Vera,'' and in other ways used as sufficient bills of indictment. The 
other indictments were then put on the file. The next matters to be 
filed were the writs of " Capias " and " Venire Facias," lists of persons 
returned to serve on juries, and the jury-panels. Finally taking in hand 
the only class of writings still remaining to be put with the aforemen- 
tioned documents, the clerk filed a considerable body of recognizances, 
i.e., the instruments by which individuals had been bound, under 
pecuniary penalties, to appear at the gaol-delivery, answer charges, 
give evidence, produce persons in their mainprise, or in other ways 
further the ends of justice. The documents were not always filed 
precisely in this order ; but in the majority of the still perfect files, 
the writings are preserved in this sequence. 

Having put the writings (numbering from loo to 200 parchments) 
on the file, the clerk arranged them so that they lay evenly, at their 
upper edges, folded in the broader documents backwards, so that none 
of them extended more than twelve or fourteen inches from the file, 
folded the deeper parchments upwards, and then with all the power of 
his hands rolled them into a firm, compact, cylindrical packet. Having 
done this, he brought round the file, and put it tightly three or four 
times round the bundle, and finally made its end fast by slipping it 
under the last coil of the cord. The bundle of documents now had 
the appearance of a roll, neatly and fully described on its wrapper. It 
looked like a roll, but was in fact a file of documents packed roll- 
wise. There is no reason why a bundle of parchments thus put to- 
gether by strong and masterly hands, if only it be left undisturbed in a 
dry chamber, should not last uninjured by time for a thousand years, 
or why, on being opened a thousand years after its construction, the 
writings should not be as legible as when they were first penned. But 
the muniment-rooms of olden time were seldom so dry as such deposi- 
taries should be ; and human restlessness is not favourable to the con- 
ditions under which records are permitted to repose without disturbance. 

Damp and necessary disturbance are chiefly accountable for the 
disorder and destruction of old documents ; and this is especially true 
in respect to such packets of ancient writings as Sessions' Rolls, at 
whose removal from an old to a new building, or from one chamber 
to another room in the same building, the snapping of a single string 
may throw a hundred writings into confusion and litter. In the course 
of centuries occasions naturally arise when it is needful to move the 
archives of a Sessions House. On the erection of a new court-house, 
it is needful to transfer such documents from building to building. On 



XXX EDITOR S PREFACE. 

the mere enlargment of an old court-house, the disturbance of its rolls 
is an ordinary incident of measures for structural improvement. Such 
occasions are fraught with peril to the ancient writings, whose removal 
for needful purposes is usually committed to the deficient discretion of 
pel sons, who, besides being ignorant of the value of such sources of 
historical evidence, are apt to imagine that things, so elastic and seem- 
ingly tough as bundles of parchments, tied up with apparently stout 
ligaments, do not need to be handled tenderly. Workmen, who pack 
new bricks with proper care for their fragility, will from sheer ignorance 
and simplicity toss old session-rolls about, as though no violence could 
break them. It is needless to say that if, besides being handled thus 
roughly at seasons of necessary disturbance, an accumulation of ancient 
manuscripts is exposed for hours at a time to heavy and drenching rain- 
fall, and straightway crammed into a chamber of inadequate dimensions 
and no sufficient ventilation, it is in a fair way to pass through rotten- 
ness to dust. In former time it was the ill-fortune of the Middle- 
sex Manuscripts to undergo several removals. They were brought 
together from different Sessions Houses in James the First's time, when 
the Middlesex magistrates entered on their long tenure of Sir Baptist 
Hicks's Hall. The migration from Hicks's Hall to a more ample 
Sessions House was another time of trouble to the manuscripts, which 
in later years have undergone the perils and trials of several removals. 
Had it not been for these successive disturbances, it is more than prob- 
able that, instead of being slender and fragmentary, the Middlesex 
Records from Edward VI. to Elizabeth would have remained unbroken 
in their series and perfect in their details. 

X. Indictments. — ^With the exception of a few bills, preserved in the 
earlier General Session of Peace files, the indictments examined for 
the production of the present volume are drawn in Latin, with frequent 
interpolations of English words, for the explanation and familiar de- 
finition of the Latin immediately preceding them. But save for 
this use of a barbarous and more or less contracted Latin, these indict- 
ments differ in no important respect from the indictments used in 
criminal proceedings at the present time. Opening either with the 
words " Juratores pro Domina Regina presentant quod," or the words 
" Inquiratur pro Domina Regina si" even as Victorian indictments open 
with " The Jurors for our Lady the Queen present that," or " Let it be 
enquired for our Lady the Queen if," each Elizabethan indictment states 
precisely, and seldom with needless amplitude, the names and descrip- 
tion or descriptions of the indicted person or persons, the offence or 
offences charged against the same person or persons, and the place, 
time and material circumstances of the alleged offence or offences. 

It may not, however, be assumed that the old indictments in their 



editor's preface. xxxi 

present state exhibit nothing more than these particulars. For it was 
the practice of the Clerk of the Peace to put on each of the more im- 
portant indictments brief minutes of the incidents and consequences of 
the arraignment, and also brief memoranda of other matters touching 
the case, some of these matters often being incidents that occurred at 
times considerably subsequent to the dates of the arraignments. From 
some of these minutes or memoranda (to be found on most, though 
not on all, of the indictments), one learns whether a particular culprit 
put himself ' Guilty ' or pleaded his innocence ; whether, after putting 
himself 'Guilty,' he pleaded his clergy; whether the plea of clerical 
privilege was allowed, in consideration of his ability to read a verse 
from the bible, or denied in consideration of his lack of learning, or 
because he had on a former occasion escaped the gallows by a timely 
exhibition of clerical address, or because there was suflScient proof of 
his having committed an unclergiable felony, or for any of the other 
reasons that occasionally debarred felonious clerks from the benefit of 
the plea. So also one learns whether, for one of the minor offences for 
which the capital sentence could not be given, a culprit was whipt, 
branded, fined, or put in the pillory. By other memoranda it is told in 
the fewest possible words of extremely contracted Latin, how an 
urchin, who might have been sent to the gallows for stealing a few 
shillings of his master's numbered money, was discharged with a warn- 
ing, in consideration of his juvenility ; how, on being convicted of a 
petty theft, a serving-girl was sentenced to no more severe punishment 
than the shame of doing penance in her parish church ; how another 
girl, guilty of steaUng chattels to the value of several pounds, was 
fortunate in having a jury capable of appraising the stolen things at 
eleven pence, so that instead of being hung she was dismissed with 
wholesome admonition ; how a gentleman-highwayman came into court 
with the Queen's pardon of his part in a felony, that a few weeks 
earlier had sent his confederate in iniquity to the gallows. By these 
memoranda the files, that without them woyld be mere rolled files, 
become sessions-w//j, in their literary substance and essence, though 
not in their literary form, — i.e. coherent records of the acts and pro- 
ceedings of successive sessions. 

(a.) An Incident of Arraignment. — One of these numerous, diverse, 
and diversely written memoranda runs thus : " Po se cul ca null sus." 
In this note, fo stands for ponit, cul for culpabilem, ca null for catalla 
nulla, and sus for suspendatur. Extended and punctuated, the note 
runs thus: "Ponit se culpabilem; catalla nulla; suspendatur,"=in 
EngHsh, " He puts himself ' Guilty ' ; no chattels {i.e. for forfeiture) ; 
let him be hung." In some cases, instead of ending with "sus," the 
note gives " sus per col "=suspendatur per collum=let him be hung 



xxxii EDITOR'S PREFACE. 

by the neck. In other notes, instead of " sus " or " sus per col," we 
read " h'et jud " or " h'eat judic' "=he has judgment ; or, let him have 
judgment. Perhaps the most noteworthy part of the memorandum is 
the introductory " po se cul "=he puts himself ' Guilty.' In recent 
time the fashion has prevailed to speak of a prisoner as pleading 
' Guilty,' when he ' puts himself Guilty,' i.e. confesses the offence 
charged against him ; though it is obvious on a moment's consideration 
that a mere avowal of guilt is neither a plea nor in any way of the 
nature of a plea. That the customary misdescription of the act, by 
which the culprit in sheer despair of acquittal surrenders himself to 
justice, is an innovation no less modern than corrupt, appears from the 
fact that Blackstone observes, " When a criminal is arraigned, he either 
stands 7nute or confesses the fact ; which circumstances we may call 
incidents to the arraignment ; or else he pleads to the indictment," — in 
other words, puts himself ' Not Guilty,' and in doing so pleads his 
innocence as a reason why he should be acquitted of the crime charged 
against him. 

{p.) The other Incident to Arraignment — " Standing Mute." — To the 
other and rare incident of arraignment, i.e. the offence of the criminal 
who, on being required to confess the indictment or plead to it (in 
other words to put himself ' Guilty ' or plead his innocence), we are 
indebted for the memorandum " Ideo judicium dat' est p' Cur' scz fort 
et dure" {i.e. soit my en la prisone fort et dure) = Let him be put in 
strong and hard prison ; a memorandum , which demands a few 
explanatory words, though it seldom appears on the indictments lying 
at Clerkenwell. From the third year of Edward I. to a time lying 
between 31 Edward III. and 8 Henry IV. the criminal sentenced for 
inconvenient taciturnity to " prisone fort et dure " endured an imprison- 
ment which, though stern and rigorous even to extreme cruelty, was a 
punishment that men of singular fortitude and unusual bodily strength 
could support for five or even six weeks. It was also a punishment 
which the sufferer could terminate by yielding to the law and answering 
to the charge. But in later time the "fort et dure'' was a compara- 
tively quick passage to death ; it being provided (possibly, as Black- 
stone suggests, by considerations of mercy) that the culprit should be 
laid naked on his back in a dark chamber under as great a weight of 
iron as he could bear without immediate extinction of his life, and 
should remain under this mortal burden till he should die, the suste- 
nance afforded him during his torture being three morsels of' the worst 
bread, on alternate days, and draughts of putrid water on the days 
coming between these allowances of solid food. It is not surprising 
that malefactors seldom provoked the sentence " fort et dure " ; for 
though, in cases of felony and petit treason, the culprit could escape 



editor's preface. xxxiii 

corruption of blood and escheat of lands by standing mute, the hideous 
torture did not exempt him from forfeiture of goods and chattels. 

(c.) Benefit of Clergy. — Another of the more noteworthy memoranda 
runs thus : " Cogn Ind ca null pet Hb leg ut cler ust in man trad or." 
In Elizabeth's eighteenth year and all the succeeding years of her reign, 
this minute, instead of closing with " trad or," ends with " trad secdm 
Stat &c.," or " juxta formam statuti &c." In extension, the note in the 
earlier form runs thus ; " Cognoscit (or cognovit) indictamentum : catalla 
nulla ; petit (or petiit) librum ; legit ut clericus ; ustus in manu traditur 
ordinario,"=He confesses (or confessed) the indictment ; has (or had) 
no chattels \ asks (or asked) for the book ; reads (or read) like a clerk ; 
burnt in the hand, he is delivered to the ordinary." Appearing in differ- 
ent degrees of contractedness, this note appears with numerous variations 
of the words. For instance, " Po se cul"=(he puts or put himself 
Guilty) is often substituted for its precise equivalent " Cogn' ind'" = 
(he confesses or confessed the indictment). Instead of writing " ust in 
man," the recorder sometimes wrote " crem in man." In the later 
indictments of Elizabeth's reign, he seldom used either " ust " or " crem," 
but with greater amplitude says of the convicted clerk " signat' cum 
litera T et del (or delib) secndm formam statuti &c.''=he is marked 
with the letter T and delivered according to the form of the statute &c. 

It can scarcely be needful for me to remind any reader of this page 
that, in the times when the privilegmm clericale exempted clerks in holy 
orders from criminal process before secular judges, and the ability to 
read in a clerkly manner was accepted as sufficient proof of the reader's 
clerical quality, laymen capable of reading were allowed to participate 
in an exemption which at first had been accorded only to wearers of 
the clerical habit and tonsure, and that, under this extension of clerical 
privilege to people in no way connected with the sacerdotal order or the 
service of the Church, it was neither impossible nor uncommon for a 
rascal to persist from early manhood to old age in a career of violence 
and crime, without undergoing punishment in any degree proportionate 
to his misdeeds. But though it is needless to speak at any length of 
matters so universally known, it will be for the convenience of some 
of its general readers that this preface should touch cursorily on a few 
points of the ancient and long since abolished law relating to benefit of 
clergy and the purgation of felonious clerks. 

Of the abuses arising from so curious an extension of a particular 
clerical privilege, some notion is afforded by the language of Henry 
the Seventh's brief enactment (4 Henry VII. c. 13) for their abate- 
ment, which runs thus : — 

" Item, Whereas upon Trust of the Privilege of the Church, divers persons, 
lettered, have been the more bold to commit Murder, Rape, Robbery, Theft, and all 

C 



xxxiv editor's preface. 

other mischievous Deeds, because they have been continually admitted to the Benefit 
of the Clergy as often as they did offend in any of the Premisses ; in avoiding such 
presumptuous Boldness, It is enacted, ordained and established by the authority of 
this present Parliament, That every Person, not being within Orders, which once 
hath been admitted to the Benefit of his Clergy, eftsoons arraigned of any such 
offence, be not admitted to have the Benefit of his Clergy ; and that every Person 
so convicted of Murder, to be marked with an M on the Braun of the Left 
Thumb ; and if he be for any other Felony, the same Person to be marked with a T 
in the same place of the Thumb, and those Marks to be made by the Gaoler openly 
in the Court before the Judge, before such Person be delivered to the Ordinary. Pro- 
vided alway, if any Person at the second time of asking his Clergy, because he is 
within Orders, hath not then and there ready his Letters of his Orders, or a certifi- 
cate of his Ordinary vritnessing the same, that then the Justices, afore whom he is so 
arraigned, shall give him a Day by their Discretion to bring in his said Letters or 
Certificate ; and if he fail, and bring not in at such a Day his said Letters nor Certi- 
ficate, then the same Person to lose the Benefit of his Clergy, as he shall do that is 
without orders." 

By this statute, therefore, it was ordained, together with other pro- 
visions for the limitation of the Clerical Privilege and the evils arising 
from it, that no layman should have benefit of his clergy on more than 
one occasion, and that every layman on pleading his clergy should be 
so marked in his person with a branding-iron that, in case he presumed 
to plead it a second time, the scar on the brawn of his left thumb would 
be a good reason for making especial inquisition into his history, though 
not sufficient evidence to justify an immediate and disdainful denial 
of his prayer. That the stigma thus put upon a criminal's hand was, 
however, sometimes less effectual in this respect than the law designed 
it to be, appears from the several cases in which an incorrigible offender 
pleaded his clergy for a second time at the Old Bailey, and pleaded it, 
moreover, in a manner which made it necessary to produce the record 
of his previous delivery to the bishop, and also to impanel a jury to 
ascertain whether or no he was the same clerk so delivered to the Church 
after being branded. The brand was unquestionably indelible so long 
as the tissues of the branded brawn were subjected to no unusual 
violence ; but it was within the resources of surgery to replace the 
brand of penal shame with a broader and deeper scar, which, though 
suspicious, would be less than damnatory. That the Tyburn T was 
sometimes deleted in this way from the brawn of a rascal's thumb is 
the reasonable inference from the number of second applications for 
the benefit of scholarship. 

The favour shown to the clergy, and the advantages reserved to them 
over the laity, by this enactment of Henry the Seventh's fourth regnal 
year, ceased for awhile under that monarch's son, through the operation 
of the seventh section of 28 Henry VIII. c. i, which ordained, " That 
such as be within Holy Orders shall from henceforth stand and be 
under the same Pains and Dangers for the Offences contained in any 



editor's preface. XXXV 

of the said Statutes, and be used and ordered, to all Intents and Pur- 
poses, as other Persons not being within Holy Orders ; " — a provision 
repeated with greater amplitude and precision by the eighth section of 
32 Henry VIII. c. 3, ordering "That such Persons as be or shall be 
within Holy Orders, which by the Laws of this Realm ought or may 
have their Clergy for any Felonies, and shall be admitted to the same, 
shall be brent in the Hand in like Manner and Form as Lay Clerks be 
accustomed in such cases, and shall suffer and incur afterward all such 
Pains, Dangers and Forfeitures, as be ordered and used for their 
Offences of Felony, to all Intents, Purposes and Constructions, as Lay 
Persons admitted to their Clergy be or ought to be ordered and used 
by the Laws and Statutes of this Realm." 

But the favour and advantages to the clerical order, thus withdrawn 
by these statutes of Henry the Eighth, were restored to the clergy by 
the Statute i Edward VI. c. 12, which, together with other provisions, 
ordained that the benefit of peerage (equivalent to benefit of clergy) 
should, for a first offence, be accorded, without the humiliation of 
branding in the hand, to every lord of parliament and peer of the 
realm, having place and voice in parliament, who should be guilty of 
any crime clergyable to commoners, or of housebreaking, highway 
robbery, horse-stealing and robbing of churches, although he should 
be unable to read ; — a concession to people of high quality that, to 
the Duchess of Kingston's advantage in the eighteenth century, was 
held to extend to peeresses. 

The distinction between clergymen in sacred orders and laymen rated 
as' clerks because they could read having been thus revived, the law 
touching Benefit of Clergy and the delivery of felonious clerks in respect 
to clergyable felonies remained for the most part in accordance with 
Henry the Seventh's reformatory enactment till the i8th of Elizabeth, 
when it was ordained by " Cap. vii. : An Act to take away Clergy from 
the Offenders in Rape or Burglary, and an Order for the Delivery of 
Clerks Convict without Purgation," that " every Person and Persons, 
which at any Time after the End of this present Session of Parliament 
shall be admitted and allowed to have the Benefit or Privilege of his 
or their Clergy, shall not thereupon be delivered to the Ordinary as 
hath been accustomed, but after such Clergy allowed, and Burning in 
the Hand, according to the Statute in that Behalf provided, shall forth- 
with be enlarged and deUvered out Prison by the Justices before whom 
such Clergy shall be granted;" power being, however, given by the 
same statute to the Judge, to hold' the offender yet longer in gaol — 
for any term not exceeding a year, in cases where immediate dismissal 
should seem too large a measure of leniency. Hence it is that, in 
Elizabeth's i8th year the words " traditur Ordinario" were replaced by 



xxxvi EDITORS PREFACE. 

"deliberatur secundum statutum " or " juxta formam statuti &c." in 
the memorandum, to which the reader's attention has been called. 

It would be wrong to assume that the culprit, who pleaded his clergy 
successfully, escaped without any punishment, beyond the humiliations 
attending his arrestment, preliminary trial by the grand jury, and arraign- 
ment. By I Edw. VI. c. 3 (repealed by 3, 4 Edw. VI. c. 16), felonious 
clerks, who obtained Benefit of Clergy with power of making purgation, 
were committed for an entire year as " slaves " to any person who would 
take them, before being allowed to purge themselves. Delivered to 
the bishop " absque purgatione faciendS,," they were enslaved for five 
years to masters, who had express authority to correct and govern them 
with stripes and chains. In times not affected by this short-lived 
statute, on being delivered to the bishop without power of making 
purgation, the felonious clerk derived from his privilegium clericale no 
brighter prospect than that of remaining in prison to the end of his 
days, unless he had influence with which to procure the sovereign's 
pardon ; and there is no reason for thinking the discipline of a bishop's 
prison milder than the discipline of a secular gaol. When he was free 
to make his purgation at the earliest opportunity, he had to wait the 
bishop's pleasure for the opportunity. On coming before the bishop 
or the bishop's deputy, it was incumbent on him to swear he was 
innocent of the crime laid to his charge, "although," says Blackstone, 
" he had been previously convicted by his country, or perhaps by his 
own confession." The timidity and reserve, with which Blackstone 
makes the latter suggestion, at least imply a disposition to think it 
no affair of every-day occurrence for a culprit thus to swear himself 
innocent of the charge in respect to which he had shortly before declared 
himself ' Guilty.' Yet no student of the Clerkenwell rolls will doubt it 
was an incident of the commonest kind. It was rare for a prisoner to 
plead his clergy as a declinatory plea. In a considerable proportion of 
cases, the plea was made in arrest of judgment after a previous pleading 
of innocence, followed by trial and conviction. But in the great 
majority of cases, the pleading for Benefit of Clergy was made by a 
culprit, who had already avoided a trial, that could have had only one 
conclusion, by putting himself ' Guilty.' 

To commit yet another perjury would not vex the conscience of a 
callous malefactor. But some of the persons, who to regain their 
liberty had in the bishop's presence to swear themselves innocent of 
what they knew themselves to be guilty, were no habitual criminals, 
but men far from utterly devoid of conscientiousness, though in a 
moment of weakness and urgent distress they had picked a purse, or 
carried a silver wine-cup off from a tavern. A few of them were 
men of honour and sensibility, who in days of universal duelUng had 



EDITOR'S PREFACE. xxxvil 

.drawn sword irupulsively in a street-riot or a tavern brawl, and with no 
clear and deliberate pu^-pose of taking lifeihad committed manslaughter. 
Toputhis casebefojre ajury of clerks and laymen, it was not enough 
for one of these upright and God-fearing offenders to swear, that he 
had not done what he was. acutely remorseful for having done. It was 
incumbent on him to produce twelve confederates, styled his compur- 
gators, who should one and all swear solemnly that they believed his 
declaration of innocence to be sincere and truthful, though they one 
and all must have known it to be a lie. The twelve compurgators 
having discharged their function of falsehood on oath, there was an 
examination of witnesses on behalf of the prisoner. Each of these 
witnesses swore what he was engaged and instructed to swear for the 
culprit's benefit, and swore all the more thoroughly because he knew 
that no attempt would be made to expose the falseness of his testimony, 
and that no evidence might be produced against the offender. Under 
these circumstances, it is not surprising that the trial usually ended in 
the prisoner's acquittal. In a certain proportion of the trials for 
the purgation of ordained clerks and clerkly laymen there was no 
need of perjury, and in such cases no perjury was committed. But in 
the majority of cases, the trial was from first to last a sham trial, in 
which the prisoner at the bar, the compurgators, the twelve clerks and 
laymen on the jury one and all committed perjury, and knew themselves 
to have been brought together in order that they should commit it. The 
clerks of the jury were none the less guilty of perjury, because their 
verdict was in accordance with the evidence submitted to them in 
court. If the judge (who sometimes was the bishop himself) did not 
commit perjury, he was at least guilty of something more than mere 
connivance at perjury ; for both by act and word he affected to believe 
the compurgators and jury, and played his part in the blasphemous 
farce, as though it were a sincere and honest inquisition for the dis- 
covery of the truth. 

Something, no doubt, could be urged in behalf of the extension of 
the privilegium clericale to mere laymen, even in the time when the 
privilege was abused most flagrantly, as a concession that mitigated 
the rigor of a barbarously simple penal code. More could be said 
in its favour when, through the operation of Henry the Seventh's 
statute, it merely affected first convictions or arraignments, and gave 
' another chance ' to culprits whose education afforded some stronger 
grounds of hope for their subsequent amendment, though they were 
certainly not more deserving of sympathy and commiseration than 
absolutely unlettered and ignorant offenders. But no apology could 
be offered for the extravagant indecencies of the proceedings, to which 
Elizabeth put an end in her eighteenth year. No less to the clergy, 



xxxvm EDITOR S PREFACE. 

who were most averse to secular interference in ecclesiastical affairs, 
than to the more discreet and sober of the laity, the enactment which 
abolished these impious sham-trials for the purgation of felonious clerks, 
must have been a welcome relief from what was scandalous to the 
church and hurtful to the whole community. 

XI. Indictment of Ben jFonson for Manslaughter. — Enough having 
been said of the general characteristics of the earlier of the indictments 
lying at the Clerkenwell Sessions House, it will be well to submit to 
readers a single example of one of these writings. And no speci- 
men can better serve the purpose of its exhibition than the deeply and 
painfully interesting document here given, ist, in its proper contracted- 
ness, 2ndly, in extension, and srdly, in English. It is the indictment on 
which Ben Jonson was arraigned at the Justice Hall in the Old Bailey 
in October 1598, for the manslaughter of Gabriel Spencer. 

(«.) The indictment, with endorsement and capital memorandum, in 
the contracted Latin of the document,^ 

Cog?t' Indidament petit librum legit ut Cl'icus sign' cum Ira T Et 
del' iuxta formam statuf &^c. 

Middss. Juratores pro Dria Regina p'n'tant q"*. Beniaminus Johnson 
nup de London yoman Vicesimo Secundo die Septembris Anno regni 
Dfie Elizabethe Dei gfa Anglie Franc' & Hibinie Regine fidei defen- 
soris &c. Quadragesimo Vi & armis &c*. In et sup quend^m Gabrielem 
Spencer in pace dei & dee diie Regine apud Shordiche in Com' Midd. 
pred' in Campis ibin existen' insultum fecit Et eund'm Gabrielem cum 
quod^m gladio de ferro et calibe vocat' a Rapiour precii iii^. quem in 
manu sua dextra adtunc & ibiii halt & tenuit extract' felonice ac 
voluntar' percussit et pupugit dans eid'm Gabrieli Spencer adtunc & 
iBm cu' gladio pred' in et super dexteru latus ip'ius Gabrielis unam 
plagam mort'lem profunditat' sex poUic' & latitud' unius pollicis de qua 
quidem plaga mortali idem Gabriel Spencer apud Shordiche pred' in 
predco Com' Midd. in Campis predcS adtunc & iBm instant" obiit Et 
sic Jur' pr'e3ci dicunt sug Sacrm suu' q**. prefat' Beniaminus Johnson 
predctin Gabrielem Spencer apud Shordiche pred' in predco Com' Midd 
& in Campis predict' [ ] predcis felonice ac voluntar' interfecit 

& occidit contra pacem Dee dne Regine &c. 

Endorsed ' Billa Vera.' 

(^.) The Indictment, with endorsement and capital memorandum 
in extended Latin,^ — 

Cognoscit Indidamentum petit librum legit ut Clericus signatur 
cum litera T Et deliberatur juxta formam statuti 
Middss,— Juratores pro Domina Regina presentant quod Beniaminus 



editor's preface. xxxix 

Johnson nuper de London yoman Vicesimo Secundo die Septembris 
Anno regni Domine Elizabethe Dei gracia Anglie Francie at Hibernie 
Regine fidei defensoris at cetera Quadragasimo Vi et armis at cetera 
In et super quendam Gabrielem Spencer in pace dei at dicte domine 
Regine apud Shordiche in Comitatu Middlasexie predicto in Campis 
ibidem existentem insultum fecit Et eundem Gabrielem cum quodam 
gladio de ferro et calibe vocato a Rapiour pracii trium solidorum quem 
in manu sua dextra adtunc et ibidem habuit at tenuit extractum 
felonice ac voluntarie percussit et pupugit dans eidem Gabriali Spencer 
adtunc et ibidem cum gladio predicto in et super dexterum latus ipsius 
Gabrielis unam plagam mortalem profunditatis sex pollicum et latitu- 
dinis unius poUicis da qua quidem plaga mortali idem Gabriel Spencer 
apud Shordiche predictam in predicto Comitatu Middlasexie in Campis 
pradictis adtunc et ibidem instanter obiit Et sic Juratoras. predicti 
dicunt super Sacramentum suum quod prafatus Beniaminus Johnson 
predictum Gabrielem Spencer apud Shordiche predictam in predicto 
Comitatu Middlesexie et in campis predictis [ ] pradictis felo- 

nice ac voluntarie interfecit et occidit Contra pacem Dicte domine 
Regine &c. 

Endorsed 'Billa Vera.' 

(c.) The Indictment, with endorsement and capital memorandum in 
Enghsh, — 

He con/esses the indictment, asks for the book, reads like a Clerk, is 
marked with the letter T, and is delivered according to the 
form of the statute, S^c. 
Middlesex : — The Jurors for the Lady the Queen present that 
Benjamin Johnson late of London yoman on the twenty-second day of 
September in the fortieth year of the Lady Elizabeth by God's grace 
Queen of England France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith &c., 
made an assault with force and arms &c. against and ppon a certain 
Gabriel Spencer, when he was in God's and the said Lady the Queen's 
peace, at Shordiche in the aforesaid county of Middlesex, in the fields 
there, and with a certain sword of iron and steel called a Rapiour, of 
the price of three shillings, which he then and there had in his right 
hand and held drawn, feloniously and wilfully struck and beat the 
same Gabriel, then and there with the aforesaid sword giving to the 
same Gabriel Spencer, in and upon the same Gabriel's right side, 
a mortal wound, of the depth of six inches and of the breadth of one 
inch, of which mortal wound the same Gabriel Spencer than and 
there died instantly in the aforesaid Fields at Shordiche aforesaid in 
the aforesaid County of Middlesex. And thus the aforesaid Jurors 
say upon their oath that the aforesaid Benjamin Johnson feloniously 



xl editor's preface. 

and wilfully slew and killed the aforesaid Gabriel Spencer at Shordiche 
aforesaid in the aforesaid County of Middlesex and in the aforesaid 
Fields [in the year and day] aforesaid against the Peace of the said 
Lady the Queen &c.— Endorsed ' True. Bill.' 

This remarkable document is preserved, intone of the fragmentary 
rolls, — a roll that has lost its dated wrapper,- writs: of 'Venire' and 
' Capias,' and Coroners' Inquisitions-post-mortem. How wet this 
injured roll was, when it came into my hands some three years since, 
appears from the peculiar wrinkles of the parchments, now that they 
are dry. How far it had gone on the quick road to rottenness and 
dust, appears from the decay of some of the writings, and the faded 
colour of their ink. But though no dated wrapper remains to give us 
a more precise date, the remnant of the mutilated file affords abundant 
internal evidence that the author of ' Every Man In His Humour ' 
confessed the indictment at the Gaol Delivery held in the Old Bailey in 
October 1598. Though some of the parchments are lost and others are 
injured by exposure to damp and dirt, the indictment on which the poet 
was arraigned is sound, legible and perfect, save that it has lost the 
words "die et anno " that have been torn from the body of the record. 
From the evidence of the parchment it appears, 
{a.) That Ben Jonson's duel with Gabriel Spencer was fought on 22 
Sept. 1598. 

(b.) That it was fought in Shoreditch Fields, which included the 
Hoggesdon Fields, mentioned by Henslowe. 

{c.) That Jonson's sword was worth three shillings, — a cheap though 
possibly a good weapon. 

((/.) That Gabriel Spencer died on the ground. 
(e.) That, besides being thrown into prison for this affair, Jonson 
was indicted for manslaughter by an indictment which a Grand Jury 
(sitting probably at " The Castle " in St. John's Street) found a True 
Bill. 

(/) That, the bill having been so taken and found against him, 
Jonson was arraigned upon it at the next Gaol Delivery. 

{g.) That he was styled "yoman" in the indictment, whereas the 
draughtsman, to guard against a dilatory plea, would have styled him 
" gentleman," had he thought him entitled to bear arms as one of the 
Johnstones of Annandale. 

{h.) That the indictment charged the poet with being the aggressor 
in the conflict, which in later time he at least on one occasion repre- 
sented to have been forced upon him. 

(z.) That instead of resisting the charge in respect to any particular, 
he at his arraignment " confessed the indictment," i.e., put himself 
' Guilty,' or (as we say now-a-days) ' pleaded Guilty.' 



editor's preface. xli 

(/) That, on being so convicted of manslaughter on his own con- 
fession, he pleaded his clergy, read his neck-verse, and was delivered 
in accordance with the statute i8 Eliz. c. 7, after being branded by a 
hot iron with the letter, known to the London populace as the Tyburn T. 

(k.) And further that, on being convicted, by his confession of 
manslaughter, he had chattels for forfeiture. Had he possessed no 
good? and chattels, " ca null" would have appeared in the memoran- 
dum over his name, at the top of the indictment. The Clerk of the 
Peace's silence as to chattels is sufficient evidence that there was a 
forfeiture of chattels. 

No one of these facts was known to any one of the poet's biographers. 
To all of them it was known that in his early life Ben Jonson had 
killed a man in a duel, and had been thrown into prison for the 
awkward affair. By some of them it was believed, and by others it 
was suspected, that the unlucky combatant was an actor at the play- 
house where Jonson was himself acting. But all of them thought 
that the duel followed quickly on the poet's return from Flanders, 
instead of happening in 1598, and that he suffered for the affair 
nothing worse than a brief imprisonment. No one of them conceived 
that the poet was indicted and arraigned for manslaughter. Gifford, 
the best of the poet's unsatisfactory historians, assumed that the 
poet was let out of gaol because his enemies ceased to persecute him, 
that is, forbore to prosecute him. The writer of Ben Jonson's 
Memoir in Chambers's " Cyclopsedia of Literature " says roundly that 
the poet was released without a trial. In a technical sense this state- 
ment may be admitted to be true, but none the less is it delusive. 
There was no trial by a jury of twelve men, because, instead of putting 
himself on the country, the prisoner put himself ' Guilty,' with the 
usual consequences. That the duel was fought in 1598, and that 
Jonson's ill-starred adversary bore the name of Gabriel Spencer, are 
facts that came to the world some years since through the research of 
the late Mr, Payne Collyer ; and in one of the notes to his excellent 
edition of Gifford's " Ben Jonson,'' the late Colonel Cunningham gave 
proper prominence to the two facts. Collyer and Cunningham, how- 
ever, knew no more than the poet's biographers how it was that he 
, escaped the gallows, which in one of his confidences to Drummond of 
Hawthornden he confessed himself to have " come near." 

There is something grimly fantastic in the notion of so good a 
scholar as Ben Jonson asking for the book, in order to prove himself 
capable of reading his neck-verse — something grotesquely horrible in 
the thought that but for Benefit of Clergy so bright a genius might 
have been hung at Tyburn like any unlettered rascal, convicted of 
having stolen a horse or stabbed an enemy in the back 



xlii editor's preface. 

One would like to believe that Jonson was marked with nothing 
fiercer than a lukewarm iron. If the satirists of a later period may be 
believed, it was not uncommon for a gaoler in the middle of the 
seventeenth century, from tenderness for his own interest and prudent 
regard for a promised fee, to mark a felon with cold steel. It would 
be pleasant to come upon evidence that Ben's gaoler marked him 
accidentally with a cold seal. The man who warned him to be careful 
what he said in the hearing of the spies and eaves-droppers, who were 
employed in Newgate to catch up the conversation of the imprisoned 
Catholics, certainly took humane interest in the young actor and poet, 
whose only crime was that he had shown spirit and address in fighting 
a duel. But whilst satirists are often misleading witnesses as to matters 
of their own time, seventeenth-century satire on the usages of the 
period is no evidence to the usages of the previous century. Whilst 
young Jonson languished in Newgate, the law for branding felons was 
far too new a law for even the kindest-hearted gaoler to palter in the 
performance of the duty it assigned him. Enacted by the Queen's 
grandfather, it was re-enacted by her brother for common folk, when 
he exempted only people of the highest quality from the shameful 
punishment. Only two-and-twenty years since, in a statute certainly 
inspired by no tenderness for criminals, Elizabeth had herself re- 
ordained that felonious clerks should be burnt in the hand. The 
branding was still done in the presence and under the observance of the 
presiding Judge. An order so recent, a sentence to be executed under 
such surveillance, was no order to be trifled with by so subordinate a 
person as the gaoler of Newgate. The painful fact must be accepted, 
that on leaving Newgate the young author of a play, which every 
lettered Englishman has perused with delight, took with him the 
personal stigma of former felony. It is noteworthy that the scribblers, 
so quick to taunt Jonson with having been a bricklayer, because in 
his boyhood he was apprenticed to a calling altogether suitable to the 
social quality of a poor clergyman's son, never allude to that awful 
" litera T." Did he keep it from their eyes ? Did he cut it out, or 
burn it out of his flesh ? Or could it still have been discovered in 
the old spot, when he was placed tenderly and reverentially in the 
coffin, that was borne in honour to Westminster Abbey ? 

XII. Coroners' Inquisitions-post-mortem. — The abstracts, given in the 
ensuing calendar, of these inquests for causes of deaths cannot fail to 
be regarded, alike by students and general readers, as a considerable 
contribution towards the social history of Tudor England, affording as 
they do much curious evidence respecting the ways in which our Tudor 
ancestors determined their personal quarrels. Hitherto it has been 
generally assumed that duelling was confined to persons of gentle 



editor's preface. xliii 

degree ; that in time of peace the sword was the peculiar appanage and 
distinctive ornament of gentlemen ; that the commonalty, being for the 
most part content to settle their differences with their fists or quarter- 
staves, it was rare for a yeoman or mechanic to use a weapon of steel 
for the redress of his personal grievances. But the inquests of the 
Middlesex coroners put it beyond question that yeomen, tradesmen, 
and mechanics, throughout the period covered by the entries of this 
volume, exercised the right of fighting with sword and dagger almost 
as freely as their social betters, and that in Shakespeare's London it 
was a matter of common occurrence for a conflict, fought at the outset 
with fists, to be determined by the knife, which the worsted pugilist 
drew from his pocket whilst lying on the ground under the knees of 
his adversary. In these parchments tailors and shoemakers are seen 
fighting with weapons of iron and steel, — now by the light of day, now 
at twilight, and now in the darkness of night. Whilst tavern-haunters 
of every social grade thus fought with rapier and short-sword, bill and 
knife, the staid and law-abiding citizen seldom went abroad without a 
dagger, to be drawn in self-defence from a convenient pocket, should 
he be molested by street-rioters, or pushed from the wall by a tipsy 
swaggerer. In Tudor time the vindictive blow followed quickly upon 
the insulting word ; and in moments of wrath blood was sometimes 
shed in the public ways, almost before the shedder of it knew he had 
crossed swords with a sudden assailant. Sometimes these affrays were 
preceded by cartel of defiance and formal invitation to the nearest 
fields ; but almost as often they were fought in the public ways, and in 
the presence of a ring of idlers who hedged off the constables till one 
of the combatants fell to the ground, and who, on the termination of 
the affair, congratulated themselves on having fallen in with such 
congenial entertainment during a mid-day walk. In the days when an 
insult in Paul's Alley was followed at an interval of three or four 
minutes by a duel in Paul's Churchyard, gentlemen left their wine in a 
Strand tavern to cross swords with one another in the crowded 
thoroughfare, under the windows of the very room that half-an-hour 
since resounded with their mutual vows of everlasting friendship. 
In some cases, the last duel to be gossiped about at the Elizabethan 
ordinaries had been fought to the death in the principal parlour of a 
private house. Unless they were fatal, these encounters seldom came 
to the cognizance of the magistrates. That the affrays, to escape the 
vigilance of the constables, were numerous in every month of the year, 
may be inferred from the frequency of the affrays in which Ufe was taken. 
In the Middlesex Records one comes also upon inquests respecting 
deaths from misadventure, deaths done by cold-blooded murderers, 
and deaths resulting from the torture and despair of miserable women 



xliv editor's preface. 

who destroyed the offspring of their weakness and shame. Whilst 
some of the deaths from misadventure (including fatal accidents at 
archery-practice) are curious and coloured with historic interest, some 
of the cases of infanticide are unspeakably doleful and harshly 
pathetic. The murders by poisoning are so few, that one does not 
hesitate to say that poisoning was an infrequent crime till the end of 
Elizabeth's reign ; but the few cases where murderers employed rats- 
bane (the sulphuret of mercury) for the achievement of their felonious 
purpose should be not allowed to escape the reader's attention. 

That a considerable proportion of these returns by coroners were 
used as bills of indictment appears from the fact that, besides being 
endorsed " Billa Vera," they exhibit the memoranda usually found 
on indictments for murder or manslaughter. But together with the 
coroner's inquisition-post-mortem a roll often contains an indictment 
touching the same death ; the indictment appearing in most of these 
cases to have been drawn either for the correction of some misdescription 
in the earlier document, or for the amendment of the finding of the 
coroner's jury. In some cases, however, the indictment seems to have 
been drawn out of mere consideration of the Old Bailey jurors, who 
were likely to be perplexed and misled by the coroner's phraseology. 
Shorter and more direct to the point than a coroner's inquisition with 
verdict of murder or manslaughter, the mere bill of indictment was a 
more convenient and effective document at a criminal trial. On the 
other hand, from its larger communicativeness, a coroner's inquisition 
is far more interesting and serviceable than an indictment to the gleaner 
of minute facts for social history. Whilst the latter exhibits only the 
matters to be proved to the satisfaction of twelve jurors, the former is 
exuberant of such details as are especially attractive and useful to the 
social historian and the antiquary. For instance, in dealing with locali- 
ties, whilst it was enough for the draughtsman of an indictment for the 
murder of a single individual to state the parish of the murdered 
person, the parish or respective parishes of the person or persons 
charged with doing the murder, or with being accomplices in the crime, 
and the parish in which the crime was done, the coroner seldom failed 
to mention the street or other precise locality of the parish in which 
the felony was perpetrated. Not seldom the coroner sets forth the 
precise spot of the particular street, and even gives the names of persons 
occupying the houses near the place, where the murder was committed. 
Had the coroner's inquisition for the cause of Gabriel Spencer's death 
been preserved to us, we should probably have learnt from it the 
precise hour of his duel with Ben Jonson, the occasion on which the 
two young actors had their first difference, and some of the very words 
of the altercation that stirred them to mutual hatred. The inquisition 



editor's preface. xlv 

might have revealed the fons et origo of the fatal quarrel. It would 
perhaps have enabled us to see whether Ben Jonson was justified in 
saying he was at a disadvantage in the encounter, by reason of the 
length of Gabriel Spencer's sword. Probably it would have shown 
conclusively which of the two combatants provoked the quarrel, and 
whether the challenge was given by word of mouth or cartel. 

From the following Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, it seems 
that, rather more than a year and nine months before he fell dead in 
Shoreditch Fields under Ben Jonson's sword, Gabriel Spencer had 
himself taken human life under circumstances which may dispose some 
readers to think it probable, that the author of " Every Man in His 
Humout " rendered society good service by putting an end to so hot- 
headed and dangerous a fellow. 

Midd'ss'.— Inquisicio Indentata capta apud Hollowellstreete in 
parochia Sancti Leonerdi in Shordiche in comitatu Middlesexie decimo 
die Decembris anno regni Domine nostre Elizabethe Dei gracia Anglie 
Francie et Hibernie Regine fidei defensoris &c. Tricesimo Nono 
coram Richardo Sheppard generoso uno Coronatorum dicte Domine 
Regine comitatus sui Middlesexie predicti Super visum corporis Jacobi 
Feake ibidem jacentis mortui et interfecti Per sacramentum Johannis 
Bonas Roberti Braithwarde Thome Peeters Johannis Carter Alexandri 
Baggley Richardi Awsten Johannis Hamson Anthonii Shippe Roberti 
Braye Edwardi Awstall Johannis Welbelovde Caroli Coniber et Danielis 
Walker proborum et legalium hominum ejusdem parochie et aliarum 
quatuor villarum eidem parochie proxime adjacentium Juratorum ad 
inquirendum qualiter quando et quomodo predictus Jacobus Feake ad 
mortem suam devenit Qui dicunt super sacramentum suum quod ubi 
quidam Gabriel Spencer nuper de London yoman et prefatus Jacobus 
Feake fuerunt in simul in domo mansionali cujusdam Richardi Easte 
apud parochiam Sancti Leonerdi in Shordiche predicta in predicto 
comitatu Middlsexie barbar tertio die Decembris anno regni dicte 
Domine Regine tricesimo-nono supradicto inter horas quintam et sextam 
post meridiem ejusdem diei Ita accidit quod diversa contumeliosa et 
opprobriosa verba inter prefatum Jacobum Feake et Gabrielem Spencer 
dicta et locuta fuerunt Racione cujus prefatus Jacobus Feake habens 
quoddam candelabrum de cupro vocatum a candlesticke precii ^\d. 
quod in manu sua dextra tunc et ibdem habuit et tenuit ea 
intencione ad idem candelabrum ad prefatum Gabrielem Spencer 
ejiciendum Super quo predictus Gabriel habens unum gladium 
vocatum a Rapiour de ferro et calibe precii ys. existentem in 
vagina cum gladio et vagina predictis prefatum Jacobum Feake 
tunc et ibidem percussit et pupugit dans eidem Jacobo tunc et 



xlvi editor's preface. 

ibidem cum gladio existente in vagina predicta super faciem videlicet 
inter pupillam oculi dexteri vocatam the ball of the eye et supercilia 
vocata the eyebrowes penetrantem in cerebra unam plagam mortalem 
profunditatis sex pollicum et latitudinis duorum poUicum de qua 
quidem plaga mortali prefatus Jacobus Feake a predicto tertio die 
Decembris anno regni dicte domine Regine tricesimo-nono supradicto 
vsque sextum diem ejusdem mensis Decembris apud Hollowell-streete 
predictum in parochia Sancti Leonerdi in Shordiche predicta in dicto 
comitatu Middlesexie languebat et languidus vixit Quo quidem sexto 
die Decembris anno tricesimo-nono supradicto predictus Jacobus Feake 
apud Hollowellstrete predictum in parochia Sancti Leonerdi de Shordiche 
predicta in dicto comitatu Middlesexie de plaga mortali predicta obiit 
Et sic predictus Gabriel Spencer prefatum Jacobum Feake modo et formS- 
predictis tunc et ibidem felonice interfecit et occidit contra pacem dicte 
domine Regine &c. Et sic idem Jacobus Feake ad mortem suam 
devenit, Et non aliter neque aliquo alio modo quam ut supradictum 
est Set , que bona et catalla terras sive tenementa predictus Gabriel 
Spencer tempore felonie predicte sic facte et perpetrate habuit Juratores 
predicti penitus ignorant In cujus rei testimonium tam prefatus 
Coronator quam Juratores predicti huic Inquisicioni sigilla sua alter- 
natim apposuerunt. Datum die et anno primum supradictis 

Per me Ricardum Sheppard coronatorem. 

Thus in English : — 

Middlesex ; The Inquisition indented, taken at Hollowell-street in 
the parish of St Leonerd in Shordiche in the county of Middlesex on 
the tenth day of December in the thirty-ninth year of the reign of our 
Lady Elizabeth, by God's grace Queen of England, France and Ireland, 
defender of the faith &c., before Richard Sheppard gentleman, one of 
the said Lady the Queen's coroners of her aforesaid county of 
Middlesex, On view of the body of James Feake, there lying dead and 
slain. By the oath of John Bonas, Robert Braithwarde, Thomas Peeters. 
John Carter, Alexander Baggley, Richard Awsten, John Hamson, 
Anthony Shippe, Robert Braye, Edward Awstall, John Welbelovde, 
Charles Coniber and Daniel Walker, good and lawful men of the 
same parish and of the four towns next adjacent to the same parish. 
Sworn to enquire how, at what time, and in what manner the aforesaid 
James Feake came to his death, Who say upon their oath that, whereas 
a certain Gabriel Spencer late of London yoman and the aforesaid 
James Feake were together in the dwelling-house of a certain Richard 
Easte at the parish of St. Leonerd in Shordiche aforesaid in the said 
county of Middlesex barber, on the third day of December in the afore- 
said thirty-ninth year of the said Lady the Queen, between the fifth and 



editor's preface. xlvii 

sixth hours p.m. of the same day, it so happened that divers insulting and 
reproachful words were said and spoken between the aforesaid James 
Feake and Gabriel Spencer, By reason of which the aforesaid James 
Feake having in his hand a certain candelabrum of copper called a 
candlestick, worth sixpence, which he then and there had in his right 
hand, and held with the intention to throw it at the said Gabriel 
Spencer, Whereupon the aforesaid Gabriel Spencer, having a sword 
called a rapier of iron and steel, of the price of five shillings, being in 
the scabberd, with the aforesaid sword and scabberd then and there 
struck and beat the aforesaid James Feake, giving then and there to the 
same James, with the sword being in the aforesaid scabberd, a certain 
mortal wound, six inches deep and two inches wide, on the face, that 
is to say, between the pupil of the right eye, called the ball of the eye, 
and the eyebrows, penetrating to the brain, of which mortal wound 
the aforesaid James Feake languished and lived in languor at 
HoUowell Street aforesaid, in the aforesaid parish of St. Leonerd of 
Shordich, in the said county of Middlesex, from the aforesaid third 
day of December in the aforesaid thirty-ninth year of the said Lady 
the Queen's reign, until the sixth day of the same month of December, 
On which sixth day of December in the above-said thirty-ninth year 
the aforesaid James Feake died of the aforesaid mortal wound at 
HoUowell Street aforesaid, in the aforesaid parish of St. Leonerd of 
Shordiche, in the aforesaid county of Middlesex, And thus the aforesaid 
Gabriel Spencer then and there, against the peace of the said Lady the 
Queen &c., killed and slew the aforesaid James Feake in the manner 
and way aforesaid, And thus, and no otherwise nor in any other manner 
than is abovesaid, the same James Feake came to his death. But what 
goods and chattels lands or tenements the aforesaid Gabriel Spencer 
had at the time of the aforesaid felony thus done and perpetrated the 
aforesaid Jurors are wholly ignorant. In testimony of which thing the 
aforesaid Coroner and the aforesaid Jurors have alternately put their 
seals to this Inquisition. Dated in the day and year first abovesaid. 

By me Richard Sheppard, Coroner. 

XIII. Recognizances. — As nearly every affair, that gave occasion for 
draughting a bill of indictment, was an occasion for binding several 
persons to appear at some ensuing Sessions of Peace or Sessions of 
Gaol-Delivery, to answer to charges or give evidence, and as it was 
needful in the ordinary way of justiciary business, to put numerous 
persons under pecuniary bond, in respect to matters that afforded no 
occasion for framing a bill of indictment, it is needless to say that the 
recognizances, lying at the Clerkenwell Sessions House, are far more 
numerous than all the other writings with which they are preserved. 



xlviii editor's preface. 

In proportion as they are more numerous, the recognizances are also 
less interesting than the other documents. From nine out of every 
ten recognizances, all that can be learnt is that nine humble and 
obscure persons, whose names are in no way associated with any 
matter of present interest, were ordered under more or less heavy 
penalties to keep the peace towards their neighbours, to desist from 
committing some commonplace nuisance, or to appear at some future 
Gaol-Delivery or Session of Peace, for the purpose of answering to 
some accusation, or of giving evidence tending to prove some quite 
obscure person guilty of some utterly unhistoric offence. The majority 
of the persons, thus bound over by recognizances of no historic 
moment, were mechanics who had beaten their wives or their neighbours' 
wives, labourers who had come to blows over too many pots of heady 
ale, artisans guilty of jeering at the constables, young tailors or other 
young craftsmen guilty of presuming to set up in business on their 
own account, instead of working as journeymen for masters entitled 
to their services, apprentices with heads broken in a recent riot, women 
at war with women of their street or yard, petty tradesmen accused of 
paltry frauds, householders charged with obstructing a common sewer, 
or persons suspected of victualling without a licence. 

Under no circumstances could the recognizances of such people and 
their sureties be diverting or usefully instructive : but these writings 
are especially barren and unprofitable, on account of their silence 
respecting the very particulars about which one would wish them to be 
most communicative. It is often left to the reader of a recognizance to 
imagine the cause for draughting the document. When a recognizance 
says anything of the delinquent's offence, the meagre intelligence is given 
by such expressions as " ad tenendam pacem " and " pro bono gestu," 
no hint being given as to how the peace was broken, or what mis- 
conduct caused the requirement for better behaviour. In Elizabeth's 
time, when it was the practice of some of the Justices to illustrate 
their Latin recognizances with brief foot-notes or endorsements in the 
mother tongue, touching the why and wherefore of the documents, 
these particular writings become less wearisome to the searcher, as 
he comes more frequently on a scrap of acceptable, and even important 
information. 

In dealing with these documents, the majority of which are as un- 
entertaining and historically worthless as several thousands of ancient 
writings can well be^ I persisted in my resolution to examine every one 
of them. Had I been less persistent in a labour, not 'altogether fruit- 
less of good though inexpressibly tedious, I might have missed the im- 
portant recognizance, taken on 19 Dec, 20 Eliz., which revealed the 
important fact, that, instead of kneeling before his sovereign for the 



editor's preface. xlix 

first time in the year 1582, as his successive biographers have repre- 
sented, Walter Raleigh was a bright feature of Elizabeth's court as 
early as 1577, — a fact which, on its being communicated promptly to 
Professor Gosse, enabled that fine and subtle critic to perfect one of 
the most remarkable demonstrations of recent literary research. 

XIV. Choice of Documents. — It will be for the reader's satisfaction 
that I should indicate the various considerations that have determined 
my choice of documents for especial notice in the ensuing calendar. 
Throughout my labours I have been controlled by the opinion that I 
ought to call attention to those writings, which afford particulars, how- 
ever minute, of new or otherwise peculiar information, likely to be in 
any way or degree serviceable to historians, biographers, students in 
any department of literary research, or artists in form and colour. I 
have therefore been careful to mention every indictment that exhibits 
the name of a historic personage, refers in any way to any movement 
or state of affairs fairly to be designated " historic," yields evidence 
touching an obsolete usage, or enlarges an ordinary reader's knowledge 
of the pursuits, serious interests, pleasures, troubles, costume, personal 
ornaments, domestic furniture, social conditions and moral charac- 
teristics of our ancestors during the later half of the Tudor period. 
To exhibit a peculiar spelling of a familiar name, the ancient designa- 
tion of an article of dress, a fact for the historian of prices, or an 
obsolete place-name likely to be valuable to the topographers of Old 
London, I have given the substance of indictments that are note- 
worthy only because they afford such particulars. Dealing with the 
recognizances in the same way, I have described many a bond whose 
only claim to consideration is that it mentions a peculiar industry, or 
revives the memory of an extinct fashion or discarded practice. To 
afford abundant evidence of a matter of considerable moment, I have 
not hesitated to describe several documents of the same purport. But 
having given the abundant evidence, I have forborne to render it 
superabundant by needless examples. For instance, having in my notes 
touching the larcenies and robberies, done during the first thirty of the 
years covered by the ensuing calendar, given a sufficiency of informa- 
tion respecting the prices of various necessaries and luxuries of life, 
the values of animals and ornaments, I take no notice in my later pages 
of indictments that under any circumstances would be valuable only for 
their information touching the same matters. On the other hand, when 
it has appeared needful to display every scrap of testimony concerning 
a state of things, I have not forborne to do so, from a fear of provok- 
ing charges of prolixity and of a delight in vain repetitions. To de- 
monstrate the frequency of duels in the highways and outskirts of 
Elizabethan London, and to show how largely the pleasure of living in 

d 



1 editor's preface. 

the town was qualified by inconveniences arising from the prevalent 
violence of manners, I have noticed all the coroners' inquisitions, 
resulting in verdicts of murder and homicide, and all the indictments for 
deeds of fatal violence of whicli no mention is made in what remains 
to us of the coroners' inquisitions. To show the unhealthiness of the 
principal gaol of Tudor London, I have given the particulars of all 
the inquests for the cause of death taken within Newgate. In the 
calendar notice is taken of all the remaining true bills for poisoning 
and witchcraft, whether they resulted in acquittal or a verdict of 
' Guilty ' ; and all the indictments for unnatural offences, rape, and 
carnal abuse of children, that were either confessed by the culprits, or 
proved against them to the satisfaction of juries. These indictments 
for peculiarly repulsive offences are far from numerous ; but in drawing 
inferences from their fewness, the reader should steadily keep in 
mind the fragmentary state of the earlier Middlesex records. 

(a.) Thefts of Church Ornaments and Goods, Teinp. Phil, and Mary. 
— For examples of indictments that, without being indictments for 
political offences, relate to states of affairs that may be designated 
historic, readers may be referred to pp. 23, 24 and 30 of the ensuing 
calendar, where particulars are given of three curious thefts done in 
Middlesex, of church-goods, belonging to the parishioners of parishes 
in other counties. From the first-mentioned of these indictments, it 
appears that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on 14 July, i & 3 
Phil, and Mary, Ethelbert Warner, late of Pitstome co. Bucks, tailor 
stole a silver-gilt chalice worth fifty-two shillings, a red velvet vestment 
worth forty shillings, a blue satin vestment worth twenty-six shillings 
and eightpence, and two linen albes, of the goods and chattels of the 
parishioners of Pitstome, whilst the things so stolen were in the cus- 
tody of Henry Walker and William Pyng guardians of the goods and 
ornaments of the parish-church of Pitstome. — From another of these 
indictments, it appears that, at High Holborn co. Midd. on 27 August, 

2 & 3 Phil, and Mary, Simon Cosyn, late of Saffron Walden co. Essex 
yoman, stole and carried away a red-silk cope, a linen altar-cloth, a 
linen albe, a linen amice, a sacring bell and a corporas-cloth, of the 
goods and chattels of the parishioners of the parish-church of Arkesden 
CO. Essex, whilst the things so stolen were in the custody of George 
Louve and William Taillour, guardians of the goods and ornaments of 
the said church. — From the latest of the three indictments, it appears 
that, at South Mymes co. Midd. on 4 Feb., 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary, two 
yeomen of London stole goods and chattels worth over sixteen pounds, 
of the goods and chattels of the parishioners of Hadenham co. Bucks, 
whilst the articles were in the wardens of the church of the said Buck- 
inghamshire parish. — Till he has recalled how church goods and 



EDITOR S PREFACE. li 

ornaments were gathered together and sold in Edward the Sixth's time, 
and how the action of Edward's Commissioners for so dealing with 
articles needful for the celebration of Catholic rites put parishioners, 
in the ensuing reign, under the necessity of buying new chalices, 
capes, amices, albes and corporas-cloths, the reader will fail to appre- 
hend how it came to pass, that the goods and ornaments of Essex and 
Buckinghamshire parishes were stolen in Middlesex from the church- 
wardens of those parishes. The appearance of three such indict- 
ments in the fragmentary sessions-rolls of Mary Tudor's time warrants 
a confident opinion that such thefts were common in Middlesex 
between Edward's death and Elizabeth's accession ; and that, even 
when they were not plundered in Middlesex, rural churchwardens in 
Mary's time were often relieved on the homeward journey of the cups 
and vestments which they had bought in London a few days earlier 
with moneys levied in their respective parishes. 

{b.) Egyptians, Rogues and Vagabonds. — In the numerous True 
Bills against gypsies and other vagrant rogues, we have another class of 
indictments, relating to a state of social affairs that may be called 
historic. To understand the proceedings which sent men and women 
to the gallows for nothing more heinous than the offence of associating 
with gypsies, readers must remember that, besides re-enacting the 
statute against gypsies of i & 2 Philip and Mary, the enactment of 
5 Elizabeth, c. 20, " for further punishment of vagabonds calling them- 
selves Egyptians," made it a capital felony without benefit of clergy 
for any person, in England or Wales, to assume the dress and speech of 
the vagabonds calling themselves Egyptians, and for the space of one 
month, either at one time or several times, to associate with and live 
in the company of the same vagabonds. 

Whilst things, strange to English people of the nineteenth century, 
were done in Elizabeth's time by the operation of the laws against 
gypsies, even stranger things were done by the laws against vagrants 
over fourteen years of age. By 14 Elizabeth, c. 5, it was adjudged that 
every vagrant over fourteen years of age, male or female, should on the 
conviction of so odious an offence be grievously whipt, and burned 
through the gristle of the right ear with a hot iron of the compass of 
an inch, unless some credible person should take him into service for 
an entire year. Though the branding is sometimes described in the 
memoranda of indictments as branding on the ear, the hot iron 
used in marking vagrants was for that purpose sent clean through 
the gristle of the ear. By the draughtsmen of statutes, it was some- 
times called " boring the ear." Sometimes the vagrant, who escaped 
grievous flogging and this thorough branding by a credible person's 
timely offer to take him into service for a year, had the good fortune 



Hi editor's preface. 

to fall into the hands of an humane master. But more often he was 
apprenticed to a harsh tyrant. Anyhow, he was the slave of the person 
to whose government he was committed. By i Edw. VI. c. 3, he was 
styled the " slave " of the master to whom he was committed. If the 
vagrant were eighteen years old, it was ordained that, on being convicted 
of relapsing into vagabondage he should suffer death, unless some 
credible person took him into service for two years. On his third 
conviction of vagabondage, the sturdy rogue had no escape from the 
gallows. The law dealt evenly with male and female vagrants. Girls 
and women, no less than boys and men, were treated for vagrancy with 
the whip, the branding-iron and the rope. 

This being so, Joan Wynstone, Elizabeth Hopkyns and Margaret 
Archer (wzVftf pp. 101, 2) were on 6 February, 18 Eliz., convicted of 
vagrancy and sentenced to be whipt and burnt with a hot iron of an 
inch in circuit through the gristle of the right ear. Whetner Joan 
Wynstone was married at the time of this first conviction does not 
appear ; but Joan Wynstone certainly was a married woman on the 
second day of the following August (2 Aug., 18 Eliz.), when she, 
Margaret Archer and Elizabeth Hopkyns were placed in the dock of 
the Justice Hall of the Old Bailey, to answer to "an indictment, charg- 
ing them with having relapsed into vagabondage and been vagrant on 
the 26th day of last July at Clerkenwell co. Midd., and at other places 
of the same county. How the three women fared on this occasion 
appears from three several memoranda on the bill of indictment. 
Elizabeth Hopkins pleaded ' Not Guilty ' and did not retract ; the 
inference from the note, which says no more, being that she was 
acquitted. Found ' Guilty,' Margaret Archer and Joan Wynstone would 
have been sent to the gallows, had they not been rescued by the 
timely appearance of two credible persons. Margaret Archer was 
committed to the service and keeping of John Luck of Wickeham co. 
Bucks, yeoman, for the space of two years ; the said John Luck being 
bound in his own recognizance, in the sum of ten pounds, to produce 
the same Margaret at Session Of Peace on the expiration of the term, 
or else to produce sufficient proof of her death. In like manner, Joan 
Wynstone was bound apprentice for two years to another credible 
person, who bound himself in a penalty of ten pounds to produce her 
at Session of the Peace at the end of the two years, or to produce 
sufficient evidence of her death. To whom was Joan Wynstone thus 
committed for salutary discipline ? To her own husband. " Ac 
eciam venit," runs the memorandum of her consignment to a credible 
person, " Thomas Wynstone de Clarkenwell in com. Midd. laborer et 
retinuit in servicio suo Johannam Winstone uxorem ejus pro duobus 
annis integris proxime sequentibus et- recognovit se debere domine 



editor's preface. liii 

Regine x li. legalis monete Anglie sub consimili conditione," = And 
Thomas Wynstone of Clarkenwell labourer came and retained in his 
service Joan Winstone his wife for the two entire years next following, 
and acknowledged that he owed the Queen ten pounds of the lawful 
money of England under Uke condition." 

This took place on or about 2 Aug. 18 Eliz. What followed? On 
the 3rd of the next following October, when she had been in his 
service just two calendar months, Margaret Archer withdrew from John 
Luck's government without his permission ; and on the same day, Joan 
Wynstone withdrew without his permission from her husband's control. 
Both women deserted service. What they did with themselves on 
deserting the service of their respective masters does not appear ; but 
it may be assumed that they returned to vagrancy and lived as vagrants 
till the following summer. On or about 30 Aug., 19 Eliz., they were 
again in the dock of the Old Bailey court-house. The indictment 
against them was for desertion of their lawful masters. Putting 
themselves ' Guilty,' both women pleaded pregnancy. Found ' Preg- 
nant ' by a jury of matrons, Margaret Archer was remanded till she 
should be delivered of her chUd. Found ' Not Pregnant ' by a 
jury of matrons, Joan Wynstone was forthwith sentenced to be hung. 
The same sentence, that relieved him of an unruly apprentice, 
relieved Thomas Wynstone of a troublesome wife. What became 
of Margaret Archer is not stated ; but in the ordinary course of things 
she wonld be hung after giving birth to her child. 

(<:.) Money, Plate, and jewellery. — Of the various offences perpe- 
trated in Elizabethan Middlesex, none were so frequent as thefts of 
ordinary clothing, common domestic furniture and small sums of money, 
viz. thefts of such things as could be stolen most readily and with the 
least risk of detection by persons belonging to the most numerous and 
necessitous class of the community. Next to the indictments for such 
ordinary thefts, the indictments for horse-stealing and cattle-stealing 
were most frequent. Whilst horses were continually stolen in every 
quarter of London, horses were ridden to town by thieves who had 
seized them in Middlesex paddocks or the grass lands of adjacent 
counties. It was also seldom for a gaol-delivery to be made and con- 
cluded without sentence of death being passed on several stealers of 
oxen and cows, sheep and swine. 

These two classes of indictments excepted, perhaps no indictments 
were more numerous than those for the stealing of plate and consider- 
able sums of money ; some of these thefts being done with enough 
violence to put them in the category of robberies, whilst a smaller pro- 
portion of them were burglarious felonies. It will not escape the 
reader, that the amount of coined gold, sometimes stolen in 



liv editor's preface. 

the public ways of Tudor Middleses^ far exceeded the sums of 
money ordinarily taken by pickpockets in these days of universal 
banking, when there is no need for persons to carry purses heavily 
charged with precious metal. In respect to the value of the stolen 
goods, and the daring exhibited in taking them from their rightful 
owners or custodians, some of the greatest robberies of precious stones 
and jewellery will endure comparison with the ordinary jewel-robberies 
of Victorian England, allowance being made for the difference of the 
values of money, and for the comparative poverty of the fairly affluent 
people of the earlier period. 

The plate-robberies indicate how large an amount of silver was 
possessed by Elizabethan Londoners in the form of drinking-vessels. 
Whilst private gentlemen of no great social distinction sometimes dis- 
played on their sideboards a greater weight of silver utensils than would 
be found now-a-days in the houses of moderately prosperous gentle 
people, yeomen of the richer sort drank their ale from silver. That 
silver cups were so often carried off from taverns, and that a silver 
drinking-vessel of a particular fashion was familiarly designated " a 
tavern-cup,'' are items of the large body of testimony to the redundance 
of plate in Middlesex three centuries since. Whilst a large proportion 
of this plate was parcel-gilt or wholly gilt, some of it was double-gilt. 

The indictments for coining and uttering false money are not 
numerous, but the few to be found in the imperfect series of fragmen- 
tary files are so interesting that I have been careful to call attention to 
each of them. That " tester,'' the slang term for a sixpenny-piece, 
comes to us from Tudor time, when " testorne '' was the familiar name 
for pieces of that value, is worthy of remark. But, perhaps, the indict- 
ments touching money yield nothing more likely to occasion surprise, 
than their testimony that the piece of gold, which has long been 
known as a half-sovereign, and known by no other name, used to be 
generally, if not correctly, styled " a sovereign " in Elizabethan time, — 
a fact all the more curious, because one of the indictments of Edward 
the Sixth's regnal period speaks of a certain gold ten-shilling piece as 
a " di-sovereign,". and some of the Elizabethan indictments apply the 
term sovereign to a gold piece worth twenty shillings. 

In the sixth year of Edward the Sixth {vide pp. 8 and 9), Alice Adams 
was indicted for stealing, together with other things, a piece of gold 
called " a di-sovereign " worth ten shillings, and a piece of gold called 
" an old aungell " worth ten shillings. Though there is no need to infer 
that it was a word of ordinary parlance, it cannot be questioned that 
the clerk, who draughted this indictment, used " di-sovereign " in the 
sense of half-sovereign. But in the third year of Elizabeth, Richard 
Tylman alias Dericke and John Dowdald were indicted for entering 



editor's preface. Iv 

Henry Walsted's house burglariously and stealing therefrom {vide 
p. 37) ten pieces of gold called soueraynes worth five pounds [decern 
pecias auri voc' soueraynes ad valenciam quinque librarum]. The 
Elizbethan indictments for stealing sovereigns worth ten shillings each 
are too numerous to leave any room for doubt that, in the reign of the 
virgin-queen, "sovereign" was regarded as a term applicable to a gold 
ten-shilling piece. Upon the whole, I was disposed to think the Eliza- 
bethans regarded the term as applicable to a gold ten-shilling piece 
and a gold twenty-shilling bearing the image of the Queen. And 
I remained in this disposition, until I came upon an indictment 
of James the First's second year, charging Peter Balishewe, late 
of London alien, with stealing, on the i8th of Dec. of that year, a 
piece of coined gold worth twenty shillings, called "an Elizabeth 
double soueraigne." 

{ii.) Clergymen, and Gentlemen of The Laity. — Careful to notice 
every indictment and recognizance, making mention of an historic 
personage, I have also been careful to omit from my calendar no 
indictment, resulting in the conviction of a clergyman or lay-gentleman 
either of felony or misdemeanour. And I have been thus careful to 
record the offences of gentlemen and of clerks in holy orders, not 
because I delight in gathering evidence to the discredit of persons 
belonging to what are sometimes called the higher and privileged 
classes, but because the offences of persons of education and gentility 
are more indicative of the general state of social morality, than the 
offences committed by people of inferior quality, training and circum- 
stances. 

Even when it is borne in mind, as it ever should be by the peruser 
of this work, that though numerous and considerable the Middlesex 
records of the Tudor period are the mere remains of a far larger col- 
lection, most readers will account it to the credit of the Elizabethan 
clergy, that so weighty a mass of indictments should afford so few 
cases of clerical delinquency. Now and again the searcher of these 
criminal records comes on a clergyman of the Anglican Church, 
indicted for trespass, violent assault, fraud, theft, or graver felony. 
But these clerical offenders are so few, as to put it beyond doubt that 
the Anglican clergy of Tudor Middlesex were at least seldom deficient 
in social orderliness and decorum. 

As much cannot be said for the gentlemen of the laity ; though it 
would be unjust to the class they discredited to forget, even for an 
instant, that the Tudor gentlemen, who died at Tyburn for their 
country's good, were the comparatively few black sheep of a numerous 
and chivalric body of Englishmen, and had for the most part fallen 
from the society and cognizance of their equals by birth, long 



Ivi editor's preface. 

before the hangman gave them quick and fit delivery. It 'does not 
appear from the Middlesex archives, that these black sheep of gentle 
birth and shameful life bore a larger proportion to the several thou- 
sands of the Elizabethan gentry, than the corresponding scoundrels 
of our present social system bear to the tens of thousands of Victorian 
gentlemen. The gentle rascals of Elizabethan England no doubt 
perpetrated offences, of which the gende scoundrels of the present 
time are seldom guilty. On the other hand, the well-born and well- 
taught scoundrels of the nineteenth century do evil things that gende 
rascals of the sixteenth century never thought of doing. 

It is interesting to observe what misdemeanours and felonies were 
committed by the gentle scoundrels of Shakespeare's England. They 
stole horses, oxen and sheep. Turning highwaymen, they stript peace- 
ful travellers of their goods, clothing and money, and, when the 
case demanded especially vigorous action, murdered them in the 
public ways. For gain or vengeance they would sometimes stab their 
enemies in the back. It was even possible for an EUzabethan gentle- 
man to steal by night into his father's bedroom, and surprising 
him in his sleep, then and there strangle him to death. Burglaries 
were often committed by the gentlemen of England in olden time. 
But these were the grander and more heroic villanies of the black 
sheep of the gentle grade, who, committing these and similar atrocities 
once in a while, condescended to replenish their purses by meaner 
violations of the law. It was possible in Elizabethan England for a 
man to be a cutpurse and pickpocket, to be a poacher and card- 
sharper, to carry off a silver goblet from a tavern-parlour or a gold- 
smith's counter, to sneak into a lady's house and sneak out of it with 
her silver spoons and finest lace, to keep a bowling-alley or a brothel, 
and yet to be a person who could have made a dilatory plea on the 
ground of misdescription, had he been described in an indictment as 
anything less honourable than an English gentleman. 

{e.) Catholics and ihdr Recusancy. — Knowing the need and the de- 
mand for fuller and more precise information respecting the condition 
of EngUsh Catholics, living in England under EHzabeth and James 
the First, I have noticed every indictment of a Catholic priest for 
celebrating masses or tarrying unlawfully or doing any forbidden thing 
within her Highness's realm, against her crown, peace and dignity; 
every indictment of a Catholic gentlewoman or other person of inferior 
degree, for harbouring, comforting and aiding a Catholic priest in his 
violations of the existing law, or for wearing tokens imported into this 
country from the See of Rome ; and every one of the many indict- 
ments of Catholics for trespasses and contempts, in forbearing to go to 
church, chapel, or any usual place of Common Prayer, — indictments 



editor's preface. Ivii 

that, even in their present imperfect and fragmentary state, afford us the 
means for making at least a general estimate of the number, material 
strength, and religious thoroughness of the Catholics of Elizabethan 
Middlesex. It will of course be observed that these indictments 
exhibit numerous diversities and discrepancies in the descriptions of the 
offenders, and spelling of their names. As these diversities and dis- 
crepancies are interesting features, and no unimportant element of their 
historic testimony, I have been at pains to exhibit them in the entries 
of the calendar. 

It may, however, be objected against any choice of documents for 
especial notice, that however trivial and uninstructive, every indictment 
affords a unit to the sum of the particular class of offences to which it 
relates, and therefore yields an item of testimony, for the information 
of those inquirers, who would get a general view of the criminal 
activity of the county, and also ascertain the respective prevalence of 
the various crimes. Mindful of this, I have been gathering and shall 
continue to gather from the session-files the materials for a precise 
statement of the number of the indictments, found by grand juries 
throughout the period covered by my volumes, the number of indict- 
ments for each variety of crime found in each of the successive years, 
the number of individuals arraigned in each year, and the numbers of 
the persons who appear from the memoranda on the indictments to 
have put themselves ' Guilty,' to have been found ' Guilty ' by trial, 
to have been acquitted, to have pleaded their clergy effectually, to 
have received the sovereign's pardon, or to have received sentence for 
their respective offences. This body of statistical information will be 
given in the last chapter of my next volume. Enough has been said 
of the fragmentary state of the imperfect series of files, to forewarn 
readers that this summary of the annals of crime in Middlesex from 
the third year of Edward the Sixth to the last year of James the 
First will be largely defective. But as there is no reason to suppose 
the circumstances, that have so greatly reduced the number and bulk 
of the files, were especially destructive of any particular class of indict- 
ments, the necessarily imperfect summary will afford reliable evidence 
as to the respective prevalence of the different kinds of crime through- 
out the whole period. On the other hand, from the summaries of the 
indictments, pertaining to those years of Elizabeth and James which 
give us comparatively perfect collections of sessions-files, readers will 
be able to form a general estimate of the amount of crime in the years 
whose rolls are few in number and attenuated by decay. 

XV. Dates. — The two prime dates, in every perfect record of a 
crime coming to judicial cognizance, are the time at which the 
offence was committed and the day of the culprit's trial. With 



Iviii editor's preface. 

respect to former and, in the majority of cases, by far the more impor- 
tant of these dates, it is seldom that an indictment noticed in this 
volume leaves the reader in uncertainty. Sometimes the decay or 
mutilation of a parchment has destroyed the evidence of this more 
important date. But the cases are few where an indictment fails to 
exhibit the year and day of the offence. This date, seldom missing, 
always precise when extant, and almost always more important than the 
date of trial, is the date prefacing each entry touching an indictment in 
the ensuing calendar. In cases where the offence may be said to have 
had two dates, from extending over a considerable period, like the tres- 
passes and contempts of the Catholic recusants, the date of the com- 
mencement of the offence is the date given immediately before the 
entry that notices it. In the few cases where this rule is departed 
from, the contents and structure of the note will save the reader from 
misconception and confusion. 

The date at the end of an entry is invariably the date of the session, 
endorsed on the particular file, that contains the particular document 
described in the entry. In the case of an indictment for felony in a 
Gaol-Delivery roll, it is also the approximate date of culprit's arraign- 
ment. The reader should, however, be cautious not to take this date 
as anything more than an approximate date. Sessions of Gaol -Delivery 
in Tudor England varied in length as they vary now-adays from the 
number of prisoners to be delivered, the proportion of the culprits who 
spared the time and labour of Judges by putting themselves ' Guilty,' 
and the various circumstances that made it a long or short business to 
deal with the culprits who pleaded innocence and put themselves on 
the country. But whatever the number of days spent on the business 
of the session, only one of the days is noticed in the endorsement of 
a Gaol-Delivery roll, except in the cases of two or three of the 
Elizabethan files where two several days are mentioned. As to arraign- 
ments, the single date is all the less precise, because the one day given 
in the endorsement may be the day on which the commission of Gaol- 
Delivery was opened, or the day on which the delivery was finished : 
since it appears from the endorsements that it appeared a matter of 
indifference to successive Clerks of the Peace whether they mentioned 
the earlier or the later date. Even for this approximate date one often 
looks in vain to the back of a mutilated rolled file. Whilst very many 
of the fragmentary rolls have lost their wrappers, no inconsiderable 
proportion of them have also lost the writs which would enable an 
editor to assign the right dates to the attenuated bundles. Hence the 
numerous entries touching indictments, that give only the year or 
reign to which the files, in which they are preserved, pertain. In 
respect to notes of indictments that have no concluding date, 



editor's preface. lix 

readers may assume the parchments to be " broken files,"— viz., docu- 
ments which, through the breaking of a string, have passed from their 
proper bundles, under circumstances rendering it impossible to declare 
confidently the approximate date of the arraignment. — Further, in res- 
pect to the entries touching indictments, the reader may be reminded 
of what has already been said of the minutes put upon a large pro- 
portion of them by the Clerk of the Peace. Unless^ he bears in mind 
that these minutes relate to incidents subsequent — in some cases, years 
subsequent — to the gaol-deliveries to which the bills belong, perusers 
of the ensuing calendar may suspect editorial carelessness, where the 
editor has failed neither in circumspection nor in accuracy. , 

The initial date of every Recognizance, noticed in the ensuing 
pages, is invariably the date when the Recognizance was taken. In like 
manner, the date prefacing an entry touching an Inquisition-post- 
mortem is the day on which the inquest was taken. As in the case 
of an Indictment, the concluding date to an entry touching an Inquisi- 
tion-post-mortem or a Recognizance is the date on the wrapper of the 
rolled file in which the document is preserved. 

When, for economy of space, several documents (preserved in the 
same roll) are noticed in the same entry, they are placed in the entry 
in the same order in which they appear on the file. 

XVI. Diction and Orthography of the Calendar. — In manipulating 
a large number of Latin documents into literature, not only for special 
students but also for persons who have either forgotten their Latin or 
never had any to forget, I have retained little of the barbarous language 
employed by lawyers of a former period in the composition of legal 
instruments. Here and there, for the better entertainment or fuller 
assurance of the special students, I have introduced brief passages 
of the more or less corrupt and contracted Latin ; but in doing so I 
have not omitted to translate the Latin into English, whenever the 
interests of Latinless readers seemed to require me to do so. 

It is more needful that I should speak of the antiquated English, 
largely used in my entries. It has been already stated that the Latin 
indictments are interspersed with scraps of English, and that a consider- 
able proportion of the Latin recognizances have English endorsements 
or foot-notes in the mother-tongue. In weaving the English of these 
scraps, notes and endorsements into my entries, I have retained the 
obsolete spelling of the legal draughtsmen. Readers will there- 
fore assume, on coming to English words of obsolete spelling in 
the ensuing pages, that they are words to be found in the writings under 
immediate consideration. This is to be assumed whether the words 
are given in, or without, inverted commas. When they are printed 
within inverted commas, the commas are to be regarded merely as 



Ix EDITOR'S PREFACE. 

indications of additional assurance that the transcriber's accuracy may 
be relied on, or as a hint that the words are for some reason or other 
especially noteworthy. 

XVII. Letters of Abbreviation. — With respect to the indicatory 
capitals of the ensuing entries, it is enough to say, — 

G. D.=Gaol Delivery. 

G. D. R.=Gaol Delivery Roll. 

I. R.= Inquisition Roll. 

O. T.=Oyer and Terminer. 

S. O. T.=Session of Oyer and Terminer. 

S. S. O. T.=Special Session of Oyer and Terminer. 

S. O. T. R.=Session of Oyer and Terminer Roll. 

S. P. = Session of Peace. 

S. S. P.=Special Session of Peace. 

G. S. P. R.=General Session of Peace Roll. 

John Cordy Jeaffreson. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS:- 

CORONERS' INQUESTS -POST -MORTEM. INDICTMENTS 



John Watson, both late of London yomen, and that JohnWatson with 
his sword gave the said^ Robert Mason on the right side of his head a 
blow, of which he died on the 7th inst. G. D. R., 5 April, 3 
Edward VI. 

II July, 3 Edward VI. — True- Bill that, at Pankryshe Church on 
the said day, Richard Warren late of Hyghholbourne butcher and 
Rychard Davyson late of Hughton co. York, stole a bey gelding, of 
the goods and chattels of Robert Pykering bocher. — Also, True Bill 
against the same two thieves for stealing, on the same day and at the 
same place, a lyght bey gelding of the goods and chattels of John 
Coke Sadler. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Richard Warren and 
Rychard Davyson were sentenced to be hung. I. R., 16 Sept., 3 
Edward VI. 

I November, 3 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Humfrey Gryffin late of the said city yoman stole a grey 
geldyng worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels " cujusdam 
viri ignoti." — Also, three several True Bills that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on 15 December, 3 Edward VI., Humfrey Gryffin 
late of London yoman, stole a cow "coloris garled" worth twenty-six 



Ix EDITOR'S PREFACE. 

indications of additional assurance that the transcriber's accuracy may 
be relied on, or as a hint that the words are for some reason or other 
especially noteworthy. 

XVII. Letters of Abbreviation. — With respect to the indicatory 
capitals of the ensuing entries, it is enough to say, — 

G. D.=:Gaol Delivery. 

G. D. R. = Gaol Delivery Roll. 

I. R.= Inquisition Roll. 

O. T. =Oyer and Terminer. 



ERRATA. 



(i.) p. 25, line 13, for " Nicholas " read "Michael." 

(2.) p. 141, line T,for " Sir James " read " Sir John." 

(3.) p. 217, line 42, /or "Thomas Winn's" read "John Winn's." 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS:- 

CORONERS' INQUESTS -POST -MORTEM, INDICTMENTS 
AND RECOGNIZANCES, temp. EDWARD VI., MARY 
AND ELIZABETH. 



31 January, 3 EDWARD VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Phihp Powley late 
of London gentleman there lying dead : With Verdict that he died 
within the gaol by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 6 April, 3 Edward VI. 

8 March, 3 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-rnortem, taken 
at Westminster, on view of the body of Robert Mason there lying 
dead : With Verdict that the said Robert Mason on the 5 th inst. was 
in God's and the King's peace at Westminster, on the bridge called 
the Kynges Bridge, when he was assaulted by Anthony Fasby and 
John Watson, both late of London yomen, and that John Watson with 
his sword gave the said Robert Mason on the right side of his head a 
blow, of which he died on the 7th inst. G. D. R., 6 April, 3 
Edward VI. 

II July, 3 Edward VI. — True- Bill that, at Pankryshe Church on 
the said day, Richard Warren late of Hyghholbourne butcher and 
Rychard Davyson late of Hughton co. York, stole a bey gelding, of 
the goods and chattels of Robert Pykering bocher. — Also, True Bill 
against the same two thieves for stealing, on the same day and at the 
same place, a lyght bey gelding of the goods and chattels of John 
Coke Sadler. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Richard Warren and 
Rychard Davyson were sentenced to be hung. I. R., 16 Sept., 3 
Edward VI. 

I November, 3 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Humfrey Gryffin late of the said city yoman stole a grey 
geldyng worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels " cujusdam 
viri ignoti." — Also, three several True Bills that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on 15 December, 3 Edward VL, Humfrey Gryffin 
late of London yoman, stole a cow "colons garled" worth twenty-six 

B 



2 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Goldhurst ; a cow " coloris 
branled " worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert 
Rede ; and a blak cow worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Mark Miller. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Humfrey Gryffin was 
sentenced to be hung. I. R., 14 Jan., 3 Edward VI. 

16 November, 3 Edward VI. — -True Bill that, at Totnam High- 
crosse on the said day, Alice Cowland late of the said parish broke 
into the house of John Stowe and stole therefrom a worsted frocke 
worth thirty shillings, a worsted apron worth two shillings and eight- 
pence, a pair of silver hooks and " tres assiculas argenti " worth four 
shillings and eightpence, and three smockes ten kercheves ten raoles 
and five neckerchevys worth twenty pence, and fifteen shillings in 
numbered money, of the goods and chattels and moneys of the said 
John. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Alice was reprieved because she was 
pregnant, and afterwards pleaded the King's general pardon. I. R., 
14 Jan., 3 Edward VI. 

28 November, 3 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Hollowey in the 
parish of Iselyngdon co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Browne late 
of London laborer broke into the close of Thomas Martyn and stole 
therefrom a bright bay gelding worth forty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of the said Thomas Martyn. Putting himself 'Guilty,' 
Thomas Browne was sentenced to be hung. I. R., 14 Jan., 3 
Edward VI. 

21 December, 3 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Kentysshe towne 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Richard Homes late of Castell Throoke 
CO. Essex laborer broke into the close of Thomas Randeson (si/:), and 
stole therefrom a whyte-gray gelding worth twenty-six shillings, and 
eightpence. — Also, True Bill against Richard Homes late of Castelle 
Thooke (sic) co. Essex laborer, for stealing on 29 March 4 Edward 
VI. a bright bay gelding, of the goods and chattels of Richard Wylke, 
from the close of the said Richard at Kentysshe towne. — Also, True 
Bill that Richard Holmys, late of Greys Thorop (su) co. Essex 
laborer, on 16 March 4 Edward VI. at Cantbynd Court co. Midd., 
stole a gryssell gelding worth twenty-two shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Thomas Radyson (sic). Patting himself ' Guilty,' Richard 
Homes alias Holmys was sentenced to be hung. G. D., 4 Edward VI. 

— February, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at .... co. Midd. on view of the body of Robert Moygn 
alias Moune, " late dwellyng in the countie of Devonshire yoman," 
lying dead at Hackney : With Verdict that in the night of the 6th 
inst. the said Robert Moygn alias Moune was in God's and the King's 
peace at Hackeney, when Robert Hamlyng late of the said parish 
yoman assaulted the said Robert " gladiis et cultellis " and with 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 3 

malice afore thought slew and murdered him. G. D. R., 23 May, 4 
Edward VI. 

8 March, 4 Edward VI.— True Bill that, on the said day at West- 
minster CO. Midd. to 'wit, in the court or hospice of the said Lord the 
king, John Keyffyn late of London yoman stole ten shillings in a 
purse from the person of John Rydgebell, Serjeant of the Lord King. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Keyffyn was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 23 May, 4 Edward VI. 

24 March, 4 Edward VI.— True bill that, at Highgate, co. Midd. 
on the said day, Antony Kendall of the said parish, yoman, obstructed 
a certain ancient public way within the Bishop of London's park, lead- 
ing from Hyndon to Highegate, by enclosing the same way with ditches 
and fences and gates fitted with locks. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
4 Edward VI. 

26 March, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, on the said day John 
Palmer of the parish of St. Clement-Danes, without the bars of the New 
Temple, hosyer, and his wife Catherine, unlawfully and by force took 
possession of a certain house in the said parish belonging to Sir William 
Paget, knt., Lord Paget of Beaudesert, and having so disseized the 
said Lord of the said house still keep him out of it. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 
4 Edward VI. 

6 April, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the parish of the Stround co. Midd. on the said day, on view of 
the body of Peter Apulgard, late of said parish, tapyster and ser- 
vant of Henry RolfF of the same parish inholder ; With Verdict that 
the said Peter Apulgard died in the hospice of the said Henry Rolff of 
"the pestylaunce or plagg" on 10 Nov., 3 Edward VI. — The greatness 
of the interval between the death and the inquest is noteworthy, 
G. D. R., 23 May, 4 Edward VI. 

16 May, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Stratford-Bowe on view of the body of Anthony Skeydall late of 
the said parish, maryner, there lying dead : With Verdict that on the 
nth inst., Nicholas Vykkeres late of Popler yoman, alias Nicholas 
Vykkeres late the servant of Bartholomew Skerne of Popler gentleman, 
and of London citizen and merchant, was in God's and the King's 
peace, in the highway called Four Myle Strete at Bromeley co. Midd., 
when he was assaulted " gladiis et cultellis " by the said Anthony Skey- 
dall ; and that after vainly essaying to withdraw from his assailant, the 
said Nicholas Vykkeres, in lawful self-defence and for the preservation 
of his life, with a stafife gave the said Antony Skeydall on his head a 
mortal blow, of which he died on the 12th inst. G. D. R., 23 May, 
4 Edward VI. 

10 June, 4 Edward VI.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 

B 2 



4 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

at Stratford Bowe co. Midd. on view of the body Ralph Crofte alias 
Croftes of the said parish maryn^r, alias Ralph Crofte or Croftes " one 
of the Kynges Maiesties Blake BalyC" there lying dead : With Verdict 
that, about 9 p.m. of the 25th of May last past, the said Ralph Crofte 
was at Stratford Bowe in the highway, in God's and the King's peace, 
when Sebastian Gowtyer, John Pychen and John Dycker, all three late 
of Stratford Bowe maryners, assaulted the said Ralph with the inten- 
tion of murdering him, and that John Gowtyer with his sword gave the 
same Ralph Crofte on the right side of his body a mortal blow, of 
which he then and there instantly died. G. D. R., 8 Aug., 4 Edward 
VI. 

19 July, 4 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at Knyght-landes in the 
parish of Eston co. Midd., Thomas Lye late of London yoman stole 
a baye horse worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of John 
Savage gentleman. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Lye was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D., . . . .,4 Edward VI. 

3 August, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Geoffrey Harryson, bailiff of the liberty of the city of West- 
minster, gentleman, by colour of his said office took extortionately 
from Margaret Bothe gentlewoman ten pounds in numbered money. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 4 Edward VI. 

II August, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Stround co. Midd., on view of the body of John Chrystean 
alias Gyllman late of Stround aforesaid, yoman, alias John Gyllman 
Bachelar son of Thomas Gent " de Stround predicta " gentleman, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that, at about five p.m. of the 28th of July 
last past, the said John Chrystean was at Stround aforesaid in the high- 
way, in God's and the King's peace, when Thomas Morecrofte, late of 
the parish of Stround aforesaid, yoman, alias Thomas Morecrofte 
one of the constables of the same parish of Stround within the liberty 
of the Duchy of Lancaster, assaulted the same John Chrystean "gladiis 
et cultellis " with the intention of murdering him, and with " a shorte 
dagger " gave him a blow, of which he then and there instantly died. 
G. D. R., 12 Sept., 4 Edward VL 

19 August, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Strond co. Midd. on view of the body of William Wreyke 
late of Islyngton labourer, there lying dead : With Verdict that on the 
1 8th of July last past the said William Wreyke was at his dwelling-place 
at Islyngton in God's and the King's peace, when Elizabeth Wreyke 
late of Islyngton spynster came in upon him and assaulted him with, 
intention of murdering him, and with her hands seized his neck, and 
strangled and broke his neck, so that he then and there died instantly. 
G. D. R., 12 Sept., 4 Edward VI. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 5 

2 September, 4 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Richard Davys and John Elwoode, both late of London 
yomen, broke into the dwelling-house of Barnard Sandeford clerk, and 
stole therefrom two double-gilt silver cups with one cover worth five 
pounds, a double-gilt silver ' salt ' with a cover worth three pounds, three 
silver cups worth three pounds, a dozen spoons worth four pounds, a 
■ . . . of worstede worth thirty shillings, and two rings worth forty 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Barnard Sandeford. 
Putting themselves ' Guilty,' both thieves were sentenced to be hung. 
G.D., . . . . Oct., 5 Edward VI. 

3 September, 4 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at Seint Johnstrete 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Pylson clerk stole a whyte gelding 
worth three pounds six shillings and eightpence, a saddle worth four 
shillings, and a bridle worth two shillings and fourpence, of the goods 
and chattels of Christofer Tompson clerk. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
John Pylson was sentenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . Oct., 5 
Edward VI. 

6 September, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Endfeld co. Midd. on 
the said day, William Sartent late of Halywell gentleman and William 
Romford of Endfeld aforesaid, with divers unknown persons, made un- 
lawful entry on a messuage belonging to WilUam Budder and disseised 
him of the said messuage, and having thus expelled him from it unlaw- 
fully still keep him out of it. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 4 Edward VI. 

24 September, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Northcette co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Phyllypps late of Breknoke co. 
Breknok in Wales gentleman, Morgan Thomas late of London 
boucher, and Lewis Joons late of Breknok aforesaid assaulted a certain 
unknown man, and that Morgan Thomas with a club gave the same 
unknown man on his head a mortal blow, of which he then and there 
died instantly. G. D., . . . .,4 Edward VI. 

17 OcroBER, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Maribone co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Bennet and Robert Parsons, both late of 
London taylours, assaulted and beat John Awood and stole from his 
person five shillings of numbered money. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' 
John Bennet and Robert Parsons were both sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 15 Dec, 4 Edward VI. 

22 October, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Notynghyll co, 
Midd. on the said day, John Browne, Antony Browne, and .... 
Kyghley, all late of London yomen, assaulted Richard Felowe the 
servant of one Thomas Symeon at Notynghyll, beat and maltreated 
him so that his life was despaired of, and robbed him of forty-eight 
yards of linen cloth worth forty-seven shillings, twelve yards of hol- 
lande cloth worth twenty-four shillings, " iii dosens panni Unei voc' 



6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

osynbrigges ad valenciam xxis.", a piece of woollen cloth called 
" Browne fieys " worth forty-five shillings, a piece of kanvas worth 
twenty shillings, " ii dosens caligarum voc' women's hose ad valenciam 
xxxiij-.", and six yards of red woollen cloth worth eighteen shillings, of 
the goods and chattels of the said Thomas. The three robbers put 
themselves ' Guilty ' : John Browne was reprieved without judgement ; 
the other two were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 4 
Edward VI. 

I November, 4 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Charterous-lane 
CO. Midd. in the night of the said day between ten and eleven p.m., 
Laurence Broun late of London maryner broke burglariously into 
the bedchamber of Thomas Breke gentleman (the said Thomas Breke 
and his family being in bed), and stole therefrom a linen handkerchief 
worth twelve pence, and an iron key worth eightpence. Putting himself 
'Guilty,' Laurence Broun was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 
Dec, 4 Edward VI. 

23 November, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Strond co. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Malowe 
late of Estsmythefeld yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, 
about 4 p.m. on the 17th inst., a certain Simon Foggetour alias Wyl- 
lyams late of the said parish of Estsmythefeld maryner was at the 
same parish in God's and the King's peace, when Thomas Malowe 
" gladiis et cultellis " assaulted the same Simon Foggetour ah'as Wyl- 
lyams, who fled and withdrew himself from his assailant "vsque ad 
quandam paludem vocat' CI ... . Banke Payle situatam et 
existentem in communibus campis vocatis Whyte Chappell Feldes," 
beyond which he could not retreat without danger of his life ; and that 
in the ensuing affray, thus forced upon him, the said Simon Foggetour, 
fighting in lawful self-defence and for the preservation of his life, with a 
knyfe gave Thomas Malowe on the left side of his body a mortal blow, of 
which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 4 Edward VI. 

7 December, 4 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view, of the body of Robert Hackett late of 
London " costermonger," at the said city of Westminster lying dead : 
With Verdict that, on the 25th of November last past and about 11 a.m. 
of that day, the said Robert Hackett was at Westminster in God's 
and the King's peace in a place called Thevyng Lane when he was 
assaulted " gladiis et cultellis " by John (stc) Lytell late of Westmin- 
ster harbour who, with a certain sword called " a woodeknyfe," gave the 
said Robert Hackett on his left leg above the knee a mortal wound, of 
which he then and there died instantly. — Also, the True Bill against 
William (sic) Lytell for murdering Robert Hackett at the time and 
place and in the manner set forth in the Inquisition. Putting himself 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 7 

Guilty,' William Lytell was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 

4 Edward VI. 

18 May, s Edward VI.— True Bill that, on the highway at Hayes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, William Maggott, Robert Maggott and 
John Stokeley, all late of London yomen, assaulted Richard Allen, yo- 
man of the King's Guard, and robbed him of forty shillings irj numbered 
money. The three robbers put themselves ' Guilty ' ; William Maggott 
and Robert Maggott were sentenced to be hung : John Stokeley re- 
ceived t'ae King's pardon. G. D Oct., 5 Edward VI. 

27 May, s Edward VI.— True Bill that, at Knightes-bridge on the 
paid day, Hugh Matynson late of Westminster laborer stole three pieces 
of linen cloth called " doble raylles " worth ten shillings, and two linen 
kercheys worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Dyry- 
vall. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Hugh Matynson was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D Oct., 5 Edward VI. 

1 1 July, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Giles-in- 
the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Whetley late of London 
yoman stole a baye horse worth six pounds, a saddle worth eight shil- 
lings and two " clookes " worth thirty-eight shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of James Frauncis gentleman. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
Thomas Whetly was sentenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . Oct., 

5 Edward VI. 

22 July, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Hoggesdon co. Midd. 
on the said day, Simon Lambart and William Adams, both late of 
London yomen, stole "aclooke" worth five pounds, two "cootes" 
worth ten pounds, three doublets of ... . worth six pounds, a 
pair of breeches worth twenty shillings, a shyrte worth ten shillings, and 
nine pounds in numbered money. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William 
Adams was sentenced to be hung : Putting himself ' Guilty,' Simon 
Lambart asked for the book and read like a clerk. G. D., .... 
Oct., 5 Edward VI. 

22 August, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Isoldon co. Midd. 
on the said day, William Barkly late of London yoman stole a sorreld 
gelding worth . . . . , of the goods and chattels of a certain 
unknown man. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Wilham Barkly was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . Oct., 5 Edward VI. 

23 August, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Isoldon co. Midd. on 
the said day, George Prescott late of London yoman, and William 
Prescott late of Calais yoman stole a sorreld gelding worth five pounds 
and a greye gelding worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of 
John Wyberd. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' George and Wilham were 
sentenced to be hung, but before execution received the King's pardon. 
G. D., . . . Oct., 5 Edward VL 



8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

20 October, 5 Edward VI.— True Bill that, on the said day and 
before and afterwards, John Tredway of Stanwell co. Midd. tayler 
passed his life luxuriously to the hurtful example of all the King's 
other lieges, and against the same King's peace (luxuriose vitam suaiii 
degit in pernisiosum exemplum omnium aliorum ligeorum dicti dommi 
Regis ac contra pacem ejusdem domini Regis). G. S. P. R., Easter, 6 
Edward VI. 

6 November, 5 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Hugh Heigham yeoman, late the servant of Thomas Warren of the 
said parish esq., there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
22nd of October last past between three and five p.m., Hugh 
Judde late of London yoman, and late the servant of Sir Ralph 
Rowlett knt. of the aforesaid parish, was in God's and the Queen's 
peace in the same parish, when the aforesaid Hugh Heigham " gladiis 
et cultellis " assaulted him, and forced upon him an affray, in which 
the same Hugh Judde, fighting in self-defence and for the preservation 
of his life, with his sword gave Hugh Heigham on the left side of his 
body a mortal blow, of which he died on the said 22nd of the last 
month. G. D. R., . . . . Nov., 5 Edward VI. 

18 December, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Whytechappell 
CO. Midd. in the night of the said day about ten p.m., William Hyll 
alias, Nyghtyngale late of Robertes Bridge co. Sussex glover broke 
into the house of ... . Hall glover, and stole therefrom sixty 
pounds of wool worth . . . . ; and " four dosen of felles " worth 
three pounds. Refusing to put himself ' Guilty ' or ' Not Guilty,' 
William Hill was committed to the peine forte et dure. At the foot of 
the bill appears this memorandum, " Pd. Will's noluit ponere se ipsum 
in jur" illam sed recusavit resp' sc'd'm legem. Ideo judicium- dat' est 
p' Cur' scz, fort et dure." G. D. R., 21 Jan., 5 Edward VI. 

5 January, 5 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at the Stroond co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Foster late of London yoman entered the 
house of Henry the Earl of Arrundell and stole therefrom " quad- 
raginta sex pisces salsar' vocat' haberdynes " worth forty shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of the said Earl. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas 
Foster was sentenced to be hung. G. D., 21 Jan., 5 Edward VI. 

22 February, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Hoggesden co. 
Midd. on the said day, Alice Adams late of London spynster broke 
into the house of John Shepherd at Hoggesdon, and stole therefrom 
" a womans kertyll of Russell worsted superbodied with damaske " 
worth forty shillings, " unum . par manicarum de seric' voc' tawin 
damaske ad valenc' Vi-.," a piece of gold called " an olde ryall " worth 
fifteen shillings, a piece of gold called '' a di-soueraign " worth ten 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 9 

shillings, a piece of gold called " an old aungell " worth ten shillings, 
eight pieces of linen worth six shillings and eightpence, and sixteen 
shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of 
the said John Shepherd. Alice Adams put herself ' Guilty ' and was 

remanded on account of her pregnancy. G. D. R., , 

6 Edward VI. 

26 February, 6 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at Chartterhouse 
Churchyarde co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Nedham late of London 
spinster stole a piece of gold called " a doble duckett,'' a piece of 
gold called " a French Crowne," and a piece of gold called " a Cruesa- 
dowe," of the goods and chattels of an unknown man. Po se non cull 

nee. G. D., 6 Edward VI. 

14 March, 6 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes 
without the bars of the New Temple on the said day, Philip Danyell 
late of London yoman entered the house or hospice of Clementes Inne, 
and stole therefrom sixty pieces " vasorum electri anglice vocat' pewter 
vessels " worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Fellows of 
the said Hospice, then in the custody of Leonerd Stephenson, Principal 
of the same hospice. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI. 

29 March, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Stebunheth co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Browne late of Stebunheth aforesaid yoman 
entered the house of George Lyster, and stole therefrom a linen sheet 
worth eight shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Balton of 
London citizen and goldsmith. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas 
Browne was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 June, 6 Edward VI.' 

6 April, 6 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Westminster on view of the body of John Rypley late of the said 
city yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 8 Nov. 5 Edward 
VI. about ten p.m., in a certain place within the said city called "the 
lytle Sent Tuarie,'' a certain Thomas Rugg late of the said city yoman 
was in God's and the King's peace, when the said John Rypley " gladiis 
et cultellis" assaulted him, and forced upon him an affray, in which 
the said Thomas Rugg, fighting in self-defence and for the preservation 
of his life, with a staff gave the same John Ripley on the fore part of 
his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 22nd day of the same 
November. [Here again the length of the time between the death 
and the inquest is noteworthy.] G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI. 

25 April, 6 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquest, taken at Westminster 
on view of the body of Richard Jorden late of the said city yoman : 
With Verdict that, on the 26th of May 5 Edward VI. at Grenewiche 
CO. Kent, in a certain place called " the backesyde of the late 'Freer 
House," William Evans late of Est Grenewiche yoman with a sword 



lO MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

gave ihe said Richard Jorden a mortal blow, of which he languished 
from the said 26 May 5 Edward VI. to the 1 7th of June then next 
following, on which last-named day the said Richard died of the said 
blow. [The length of time between the death and the inquest is 
remarkable]. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI. 

28 April, 6 Edward VI.— Coroner's Inquest, taken within New- 
gate Gaol on view of the body of Elizabeth Towers late of Suthwarke 
CO. Surrey spynster, there lying dead: With Verdict that she died 
within the gaol on the day aforesaid by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 
30 April, 6 Edward VI. 

28 April, 6 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert Garden late of 
St. Katerins co. Midd. yoman : With Verdict that he died within the 
gaol on the said day by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 
Edward VI. 

20 June to 5 September, 6 Edward VI. — Imperfect Roll (twenty 
membranes, stitched together in book-fashion) of three hundred and 
twelve Victuallers' Recognizances, taken on 5 June or on days of the 
three next following months, before Sir Roger Cholmeley knt. and Ralph 
Cholmeley esq.. Justices of the Peace, in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Statute 5 & 6 Edward VI. c. 25, which ordained " that 
none after the first Day of May next coming shall be admitted or 
suffered to keep any common Alehouse or Tipplinghouse, but such as 
shall be thereunto admitted and allowed in the open Sessions of the 
Peace, or else by two Justices of the Peace, whereof the one to be of 
the Quorum ; And that the said Justices of the Peace, or two of them 
(whereof the one to be of the Quorum) shall take Bond and Surety 
from Time to Time by Recognisance of such as shall be admitted and 
allowed hereafter to keep any common Alehouse or Tiplinghouse, as 
well for and against the using of unlawful Games, as also for the using 
and Maintenance of good Order and Rule to be had and used within 
the same, as by their Discretion shall be thought necessary and con- 
venient : " each of the three hundred and twelve persons, thus admitted 
to keep an Alehouse, being bound in the sum of ten pounds, together 
with two sureties, bound in the sum of five pounds each. Disappoint- 
ingly silent on matters especially interesting to antiquaries, the Recog- 
nizances in no single case gave the name, sign or precise locality of 
an Alehouse ; but in giving the names of the pari'shes or districts of 
parishes, in which the bound victuallers were licensed to follow their 
trade, the Roll affords the data for the following table of the number 
of taverns, licensed in forty-six parishes or districts of Middlesex in the 
6th year of Edward the Sixth. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 



II 



MIDDLESEX ALEHOUSES tetnp. EDWARD VL 



No. OF 
Houses. 

• 13 
. 42 

12 

• 7 
4 

■ 5 



1 . Stratfurds-atte-Bowe 

2. City of Westminster 

3. Whytechappell . . 

4. Hakney .... 

5. Bednall Grene . . 

6. Highgate . . . 

7. Isseldon 13 

8. Grenestret in the parish 

of Kyntyshtowne . . i 

9. Hoxton 7 

10. Blakwall i 

11. Muswell Hill juxta Har- 

nyngsey i 

12. Saynt Clementes-Danes 

within the Libertie of 
Westminster ... 10 

13. Paddington 3 

14. St. Clementes within the 

Duchey 13 

15. Saint Gyles-in-the-Feilde. 11 

16. Norton Follye .... 5 

17. Hampsted 3 

18. Hollowaye 3 

ig. Highe Holbourne . . 14 

20. Fynnesbury,Whyte-Cross 

Strete 2 

21. Gmbbstrete .... 2 

22. Golding Lane .... 7 

179 



No. OF 
Houses. 

No. of Alehouses carried over 179 

23. St. Martin's nigh Charing 

Crosse 16 

24. Shorediche 9 

25. Mylende 5 

26. Marybone i 

27. Kentyshetowne ... i 

28. Stoke-Newington ... 8 

29. Popler 6 

30. Freering-Barnet ... 2 

31. Lymehouse 7 

32. Stebenhithe 9 

33. Clerkenwell 10 

34. Saynt Johns-Strete . . 12 

35. St. Katherin's .... 8 

36. Chancery Lane ... 11 

37. Sraithfild and St. Kathe- 

rin's ir 

38. Fynchley 3 

39. Harnesey 3 

40. Knight Bridge .... i 

41. Westburne-in-the parish 

of Paddington ... i 

42. Willesdon 3 

43. Kensington 3 

44. Greys-Inne-Lane ... i 

45. Wallock Barne ... i 

46. Kilburn i 

312 



Of the 312 persons, thus licensed to keep taverns, twenty-two were 
women, designated in their respective Recognizances " widow " or 
" spinster." In their Recognizances the men, admitted to Alehouses, 
are invariably styled yeomen (spelt ' yomen'), — the comprehensive and 
elastic designation, that in Tudor London covered all the various sorts 
and conditions of men, who neither bore arms, nor followed a profes- 
sion affording them at least a colour of gentility, nor subsisted by' any 
known and lawful avocation that gave its followers a more precise and 
distinctive description. 



12 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

7 November, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Monken Hadley co. Midd., Roger Daldorne laborer, Thomas Daldorne 
yoman alias laborer, and Richard Misterley serving-man, all three of 
Monken Hadley aforesaid, , stole a sheep worth three shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of an unknown man. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
Roger Daldorne received the King's pardon by Letters Patent dated 
4 March, 7 Edward VI. Thomas Daldorne was at large. G. D., 
. . . . Edward VI. 

30 November, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Holbourne co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Harris and John Warren, both late of 
London yomen, stole a black gelding worth four pounds, of the goods 
and chattels of Richard Whalley esq. Both prisoners put themselves 
'Guilty.' G. D. R., .... Jan., 6 Edward VL 

2 December, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Moyses Bartlett late of London yoman, stole a 
quarter of an angell of gold worth two shillings and sixpence, of the 
goods and chattels of an unknown man. Clerical memorandum at 
the head of the bill, " Po se cul ca null petit libru' leg' vt cl'icus vst in 
man' et committ ordinario." He puts himself ' Guilty,' has no chattels, 
asks for the book, reads like a clerk and is delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI. 

6 December, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Davyd late of the said city yoman 
stole a leather purse worth fourpence, and two shillings of numbered 
money being in the same purse, of the goods chattels and moneys of an 
unknown man : and that William Holland, knowing him to have com- 
mitted the said felony, on the same day harboured and aided the same 
Thomas Davyd. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Davyd was sen- 
tenced to be hung. No memorandum of sentence on William 
Holland, who also put himself ' Guilty.' G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 
6 Edward VI. 

4 January, 6 Edward VI.- — True Bill that, at Chelsey co. Midd. on 
the said day, Anne Clayburn late of Chelsey aforesaid spynster stole 
" vndecim duoden' fill vocat' twyne " of the goods and chattels of 
Thomas Saunders. Memorandum at the head of the bill, " Po se non 
cull nee r' q*^." Puts herself 'Not Guilty,' does not retract : Acquitted. 
G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VL 

4 January, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Charterhouse 
Churchyard within St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd., between six and 
seven p.m. of the said day, Thomas Wylson, John Warren, John 
White and Thomas Brysco alias Bustread alias Bustead, all late of 
London yomen, assaulted Adam Yonge with the intention of murder- 
ing him, when he was in God's and the King's peace, and that 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 13 

Thomas Brisco with a sword gave the said Adam Yonge on the right 
part of his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 6th of the 
aforesaid January. Thomas Willson, John Warren and Thomas Brysco 
" po se cul ca null " ; no clerical memorandum over John White's 
name. G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI. 

8 JaNUARY, 6 Edward VI.— True Bill that, at " le Strond bridge" 
CO. Midd. Edward Nele and Thomas Dennye, both late of London 
yomen, stole a dagger worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
John Rafton cutler. Both prisoners put themselves ' Guilty.' G. D. R., 
. . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI. 

9 January, 6 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hendon co. Midd., on view of the body Nicholas Eretage, aged 
nine years : With Verdict that on the 7th inst. the said Nicholas, being 
the servant of Robert Brent of the said parish, was in the act of 
carrying water in an erthen pott containing a gallon, at a pond in the 
rear of his said master's house, when by mischance he stumbled and 
fell into the pond and was drowned. G. D. R., ' . . . . Jan., 6 
Edward VI. 

10 January, 6 Edward VI. ■ — True Bill that, in the highway at Aye 
Hill in St. Margaret's parish in Westminster co. Midd. on the said 
day, Richard Stowre yoman, Richard Wood yoman, and Thomas Men- 
well gentleman, all late of London, assaulted Robert Elvyshe and 
robbed him of ten pence in numbered money. The three robbers put 
themselves ' Guilty ' : Thomas Menwell received the King's pardon, by 
Letters Patent dated on the 2nd of the ensuing February. G. D. R., 
. -. . . Jan., 6 Edward VI. 

12 January, 6 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Charterhouse Churche-Yarde in St. Sepulchre's parish co. 
Midd., on view of the body of Adam Yong late of London gentleman : 
With Verdict that, on the 4th inst. between six and seven p.m., the 
said Adam Yong was in God's and the King's peace in the aforesaid 
Churcheyarde, when Thomas Wylson, John Warren alias Whyte, and 
Thomas Brisco alias Busted alias Bustredd, all late of London 
yomen, assaulted him with the intention of murdering him, and that 
Thomas Brisco aforesaid with a sword called a " too-edgydd swordd " 
gave the said Adam Yong on the right part of his head a mortal blow 
of which he died on the 6th day of the same month. G. D. R., 
.... Jan., 6 Edward VL 

13 January, 6 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Evan alias Hewes late of the said city 
yoman stole a little piece of linen cloth called " a woman's raylle " 
worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Juliana Sendyng, in 
the keeping of William Mason alias Waltam. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 



14 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

John Evan alias Hewes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . 
Jan., 6 Edward VI. 

26 February, 7 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's 
Danes without the bars of the New Temple on the said day, Henry 
Manneryng late of London yoman broke into the house of Thomas 
Wrothe, and stole therefrom a linen sheet worth two shillings, a dozen 
leather purses worth twenty pence, four rings of gilt copper worth 
eight pence, " unum par calligarum de panno laneo coloris nigri pulled 
oute with sarsenett " worth ten shillings, and a black velvet coat worth 
ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Acland esq. — Also, 
True Bill against Henry Maynwaryng late of London yoman, alias Henry 
Maynwaryng late of London gentleman, for breaking burglariously, in 
the night of 26 Feb., 7 Edward VI. into the dwellinghouse of Thomas 
Wrothe at St. Clement's Danes, and stealing therefrom " unum diploi- 
dem vocat' a wast-dublett " worth two shillings, two "velvet wast 
gyrdles" worth three shillings, two sheets worth ten shillings, and 
" unum ornamentum de cerico vocat ' a Frenche Whoodd ad valenciara 
xxvis. viiid.," of the goods and chattels of Thomas Acland esq. — At 
the bill's foot " Po se Cul ca null," without any memorandum of sen- 
tence. G. D., . . . . Feb., 7 Edward VI. 

30 March, 7 Edward VI. — True Bill that, at White Chappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Toolye late of London pulter stole a grey 
gelding worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of William 
Rooper esq. G. D. R., . . . .,7 Edward VI. 

II April, 7 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Cecilia Style 
spynster : With Verdict that she died within the Gaol on the afore- 
said day by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., . . . .,7 Edward 
VL 

14 April, 7 Edward VI. — True Bill, that James Mayewe, Thomas 
Mayewe and Thomas Baker, all late of London yomen, on the afore- 
said day, entered the dwelling-house of Thomas Barryson of Houndes- 
lowe CO. Midd., and stole therefrom nine ells of blue cloth of the value 
of four pounds, a blue tunic worth eighteen shillings, two pairs of black 
velvet shoes worth thirteen shillings and eightpence, a dagger worth 
twelve shillings, and an ell of dark kersey, of the goods and chattels of 
a certain Thomas Hody esquire at Houndeslowe. G. D. R., . . ., 
7 Edward VI. 

23 April, 7 Edward VI. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Chancerye Lane co. Midd., on view of the body of John Jubye late 
of London yoman : With Verdict that, about five p.m. on the 14th of 
March last past, Hugh Erthe late of London yoman was in St. 
Dunstan's parish without the bars of the New Temple, in God's and the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. IS 

King's peace, when he was assaulted " gladiis baculis et cultelUs " by 
the said John Jubye, from whom he retreated as far as the " caynell 
or gutter " in the said parish ; and that, in the affray thus forced 
upon him, Hugh Erthe fighting in lawful self-defence and for the 
preservation of his life, with " a two edged sworde " gave the same 
John Jubye on his left leg under the knee a mortal blow, of which 
he died on the 4th day of the present April. G. D. R., . . . ., 
7 Edward VI. 

6 May, 7 Edward VI. — True bill that, at Golding lane co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Irysshe alias Ireland alias Musgrave stole a 
woman's gown worth thirty shillings, a velvet ' paitelet ' a sylver pynne 
and pair of silver hooks — worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, a 
woman's " kyrtyll and petycote " worth twenty-six shillings and eight- 
pence, "vnam togam nocturnam vocat' a nyght gowne" worth thir- 
teen shillings and fourpence, a pair of upper hose worth two shillings, 
and a woman's smock and three " handcarchers " worth three shil- 
lings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of Robert Pytraan. — 
Po se cull ca null : no memorandum of sentence. G. D. R., . . . ., 
7 Edward VI. 



29 August, i MARY. — True Bill that, at High Holborn co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Phelipp of Bysshoppestles co. Devon yoman, 
stole and carried off a bay gelding worth twenty shiUings, and a graye 
gelding worth twenty shillings, " de bonis et catallis cujusdam hominis 
ignoti." I. R., 23 Sept., i Mary. 

16 September, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Stanmere the Lesse 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Robert Wyllond late of London yoman, 
stole a crowne of five shillings, a silver ring worth twelve pence, a payr 
of sylver hooks worth two shillings and sixpence, a red lether purse 
worth one penny, and three shillings and eightpence half-penny, of 

the goods and chattels and moneys of a certain unknown woman 

I. R.. 23 Sept, I Mary. 

29 September, i Mary. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Chidley, esq. J.P., of ... . Case of Strond co. Midd. stationer 
and Thomas Benett of the same Strond harbour, in the sum of five 
pounds each, and George Jackson of Strond aforesaid bytmaker in the 
sum of six pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence : For the appear- 
ance of the said George Jackson at the next General Sessions of the 
Peace, and for his good conduct in the mean time towards all per- 
sons, and more especially towards John Buttery of Strond bytmaker. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i Mary. 

I November, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. on 



1 6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the said day, Nicholas Eve of London draper stopt a fowte way lead- 
ing from Heyghgate to the parish church of Harnesey aforesaid, 
" jacentem ibidem circa Crutche Ende in parochia predicta." I. R., 9 
May, I Mary. 

2 November, i Mary.— True Bill that, on the said day, Robert 
Burbage gentleman, Roger Hill yoman, Richard Whyte yoman, all 
three of Heisse co. Midd. together with fourteen unknown persons, in 
warlike manner assembled riotously in the certain messuage of six 
acres of arable land and wood with appurtenant closes of Roger 
Grene at Heisse aforesaid, and then and there assaulted and beat the 
said Roger Grene, so that his life was despaired of. S. P. R., . 
I Mary. 

2 November, i Mary. — True Bill that, John Lyn senr. yoman, 
John Lyn junr. yoman, Brigetta Garden gentilwoman, Roger Skyers 
servingman, Richard Pygg'servingman, John Ebb. husbondman, John 
Taylor husbondman, and John Yomens waterman, all of Popler, with 
unknown persons to the number of sixteen, assembled riotously and 
made unlawful and violent entry upon and into a messuage in Popler 
aforesaid, belonging to John Maynerd of London mercer, and called 
the Mener Place of Popler. I. R., 2 December, i Mary. 

2 November, i Mary. — True Bill that, John Lyn senr. yoman, 
John Lyn junr. yoman, Brigetta Garden gentilwoman, Roger Skyers 
servingman, Richard Pygg servingman, John Ebb husbondman, 
Edward Boocher husbondman, George Sheperd husbondman, John 
Taylour husbondman, John Yomans waterman, with unknown persons 
to the number of sixteen, arrayed and armed in warlike manner, 
assembled riotously on the said day, and made unlawful and violent 
entry into the dose and house, called the Mener House of Popler, 
belonging to John Maynerd of London mercer, and then and there 
assaulted, beat and wounded John Maynerd aforesaid, his wife 
Elianora, Thomas Ivey, Thomas Sharp, William Ryddall and Thomas 
Oxeman. I. R., 2 December, r Mary. 

7 November, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Islyngton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Roger Swynborne, William Barnaby, Owen Moryce, 
William Bedforth and William Smyth, all late of London yomen, 
assaulted John Greswell and robbed him of ■ thirty-six shillings in 
numbered money. All five robbers put themselves ' Guilty.' I. R., 
19 Nov., I Mary. 

14 November, i Mary.— True Bill that, on the said day at Shor- 
dyche, Edward Heyg late of London yoman stole and carried off a 
bay gelding worth twenty marks, a green carpett worth twenty 
shillings, a piece. of hangyngs containing twelve yards of red and 
yellow Say worth fifteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 17 

Thomas Champnes at Shordyche. Edward Heyg put himself ' G uity' 
I. R., 19 Nov., I Mary. 

29 November, i Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day at Totten- 
ham, George Thomson late of Wolwyche co. Kent bocher and Edward 
Pearson late Gelston co. Hertford bryckmaker, stole and carried off 
three red oxen, worth fifty shillings each, of the goods and chattels of 
John Blacknolle of London bocher ; the said oxen then being in a 
certain piece of pasture called Busshehangers in the said parish of 
Tottenham. I. R., 19 Jan., i Mary. 

I December, 1 Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day at Shore- 
dyche, John Hill of London yoman stole and carried away two yards of 
woollen cloth of a violet colour worth sixteen shillings, a frese tunic 
worth five shillings, a pair of white stockings worth three shillings 
and fourpence, " unum par caligarum vocat' netherstocks coloris albi " 
worth two shillings, and three yards of white woollen cloth worth four 
shillings, of the gopds and chattels of a certain unknown person at 
Shordyche aforesaid. I. R., 19 Jan., i Mary. 

9 December, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Drayton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Giles Feverell late of London yoman, stole six oxen 
worth thirty shillings each, of the goods and chattels of Sir William 
Pagett knt.. Lord Pagett. I. R., i9jan., i Mary. 

24 December, i Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day, in the high- 
way between Shoredyche and Kyngeslond, Philip Predie yoman, and 
Henry Rowle yoman, both late of London, took and stole from the 
person of Robert Seymer two linen bags worth ninepence each, a man's 
hat worth two shillings and fourpence (unum pileum virilem precii iij'. 
iiij^.), and two salt fishes worth two shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of a certain .... Seymer, father of the said Robert. 
Po se cul. I. R., 19 Jan., i Mary. 

28 December, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Muswell Hill co. Midd. 
on the said day, Elizabeth Cole late of Sowthwarke co. Surrey spynster 
broke into and entered the mansion-house of Thomas Wotton, and 
stole therefrom a woman's petticoat (tunicellam) of red colour worth 
thirteen shillings, another "tunicellam muliebrem'' worth eight 
shillings, and a woman's frocke worth twenty shillings, of the goods 
and chattels of the said Thomas Wotton. Putting herself ' Guilty,' 
Elizabeth Cole pleaded pregnancy. I. R., 19 Jan., i Mary. 

30 December, i Mary. — True Bill that, at Kentyshtowne co, Midd. 
on the said day, Hugh Myller late of St. Albons co. Hertford stole a 
red ox and a black ox, worth thirty-three shillings and four-pence each, 
and a red cow worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Richard Reve. Po se cul. I. R., 19 Jan., i Mary. 

4 June, i Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 

c 



1 8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Uxbridge co. Midd., on view of the body of Thomas Alleyn, there 
lying dead: With Verdict that, on 31 May last past at Uxbridge 
aforesaid, John Tyrrell, late of Chalfount St. Peter co. Bucks, yoman, 
was in God's and the Queen's peace, when the aforesaid Thomas 
Alleyn " vi et armis viz. gladiis " assaulted him with the intention of 
slaying him, and that, after doing his utmost to withdraw from the 
affray thus forced upon him, John Tyrrell, fighting in lawful self- 
defence, with a forrest-byll gave Thomas Alleyn on the right ride of 
his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 3rd of the instant 
June. G. D. R., . . . . i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

20 June, i Mary.^ — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Radclyff co. Midd. on view of the body of Robert Wanles maryner, 
there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the loth inst. at Radclyff 
aforesaid, the said Robert Wanles died by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 
25 Sept., I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

27 June, i Mary,'— True Bill that, on the said day, at Harrowe- 
super-montem, Morgan Tracye late of Harrowc-super-montem afore- 
said stole forty-four shillings in numbered money, being in a purse of 
leather worth one penny, of the goods, chattels and moneys of John 
A' Probert. I. R., . . . . i & 2 Philip and Mary. 

28 June, i Mary. Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Isoldon CO. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Cole carter, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that, in the highway at Isoldon aforesaid on 
the ist inst, the same Thomas was in a wagon sitting on a kylderkyn 
full of beer, when he fell asleep and so sleeping fell by mischance off 
the kylderkyn " inter epirediam vocat' bytwene the Rayve Stayves " at 
the back of the wagon, with such violence that his head was crushed. 
G. D. R., 25 Sept., I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

8 July, 2 Mary. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, 
Jane Drew late of Westminster spinster broke into the house of 
Thoinas Prendergert at Westminster, and stole therefrom a woollen 
cloak of shepe-russet color worth six shillings, and a little red woollen 
tunic worth six shillings, " vnam tunicellam vocatam A Warte de 
panno laneo coloris Russett ad valenciam iii^. md.," and nine shillings 
in numbered money in a leather-purse worth a half-penny, of the 

goods chattels and moneys of the said Thomas Prendergert 

Putting herself ' Guilty,' Jane Drewe pleaded her pregnancy. I. R., 
29 Aug., I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

8 July, 2 Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Popler 
CO. Midd. on view of the body of Elizabeth Averye spinster, there lying 
dead : With Verdict that, on the same 8th of July, Elizabeth Averye 
aforesaid at the instigation of the devil hung herself with a piece of 
rope, worth a halfpenny. G. D. R., 25 Sept., i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. ig 

8 July, 2 Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Tute- 
hill Strete in the Liberty of the city of Westminster, on view of the 
body of Richard Hale alias Hales, late of the said city yoman, there 
lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 17th of May last past, at St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields near Charyng Crosse, Laurence Coottes late of 
Westminster yoman was in God's and the Queen's peace, in a certain 
place there under the wall called " Seynt James Newe Parke Wall," 
and in the highway there leading to " le Hyde Parke Corner," when 
Richard Hale "gladiis baculis et cultellis' assaulted him with the 
intention of wounding him ; and that, after withdrawing from the 
same Richard Hale even to a diche of water, lying within the aforesaid 
highway, near the aforesaid " Seynt Jamez Newe Parke Wall," and after 
doing his utmost to avoid the affray thus forced upon him, Laurence 
Cootes, fighting in lawful self-defence and for the preservation of his life, 
with his sword, called " a bake-sword," gave Richard Hale on the left 
side of his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 19th 
of the same month of May. — The length of the time between the 
death and inquest is noteworthy. G. D. R., 25 Sept., i & 2 Phil, and 
Mary. 

1 7 July, 2 Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day Lawrence Col- 
becke late of London yoman feloniously entered the dwelling-house of 
William Kyne tallowchaundeler, and stole therefrom a goblett of silver 
parcel-gilte worth four pounds, I. R., . . . . i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 



6 August, i & 2 PHILIP and MARY.— True Bill that, at Hollo- 
way in the parish of Iseldon co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Row- 
lesley and Thomas Williamson, both late of London yomen, assaulted 
William Tyse, bound him with cords, and robbed him of a woollen cloth 
coat of shepe-russett colour worth ten shillings, a dagger worth twenty 
pence, and two shillings and six-pence in numbered money. Both 
robbers put themselves 'Guilty,' and had judgment. I. R., 29 Aug., 
I & 2 PhU. and Mary. 

22 August, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at West- 
minster in the night of the said day between ten and eleven p.m., 
Alexander Daragh late of the same city baker assaulted Robert Hyll 
late of Westminster and a constable ther.eof, whilst in the performance 
of his duty in the house of Robert Most, and watching the sarne 
house for its disorderly rule, and that with a dagger called a Skottyshe 
dagger the said Alexander gave Robert Hill in the left part of his 
body a mortal blow of which he then and there died. Confessing 
the indictment, Alexander had judgment. I. R., 29 Aug., i & 2 Phil, 
and Mary. 



20 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

27 August, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the 
said day at Kensington co. Midd., Roger Longe late of Londori 
yoman broke into the close of Thomas Peychey and stole therefrom a 
brown ox worth twenty-six shillings and eightpence and a pyed black 
ox worth twenty-six shillings and eightpence. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
Roger Longe asked for the book, read like a clerk, was branded 
and delivered to the Ordinary. I. R., 29 Aug., i & 2 Phil, and 
Mary. 

29 August, i & 2 Philip and Mary.— True Bill that, at Kentys- 
towne CO. Midd. on the said day, John Read of St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields near Charynge Crosse gentleman, John Frankelyn of West- . 
minster yoman, John Parke of the same city yoman, Robert Wyse of 
the same city yoman, Robert Read of the same city yoman, Thomas 
Mussage of the same city surgeon, William Frenche of the same city 
tyler, Robert Nowse of the same city sadler, and William Neale of the 
same city laborer, with some twelve unknown persons assembled in war- 
like manner, and riotously broke into a certain messuage, parcel of the 
prebend or rectory of Cantelour within the cathedral church of St. 
Paul, and expelled from the said messuage John Fecknam clerk, and 
keep him out of the same messuage even until now. I. R., 8 Sept., 
I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

31 August, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, Robert 
Smythe of Harrowe Well co. Midd. and James Lydgold of Acton co. 
Midd. laborers broke into and entered the water of John Warren at 
Harrowe Well and with a net took therefrom a hundred fishes called 
carps worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said 
John Warren. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

21 September, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, John 
Gardener of London gentleman, and William Chester of the parish of 
St. Clement Danes yoman, and John Potter yoman and John Wheler tayl- 
lour, both of the said parish, riotously and by force took possession of 
the nineteen cottages of a certain' William Steyke alias Evyn in the 
parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd., and having so disseized the 
said William Steyke alias Evyn still keep him out of the said cottages. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

I October, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said 
day, Thomas Hungerford gentleman, Robert Tuckfurthe gentleman, 
John Shelley husbandman, Thomas Kyllye husbandman and 
Thomas Collyn husbandman, all of Chelsey co. Midd., riotously 
and by force of arms entered a certain messuage or rectory, called 
the parsonage of Chelsey, with its appurtenances at Chelsey, 
and dispossessed Richard Myers, rector of the parish-church 
of Chelsey, of the said parsonage, and having so dispossessed him 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 21 

Still keep him out of his said parsonage, even to this 4th day of 
October. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

4 November, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition- 
post-mortem, taken at Clerkenwell co. Midd. on view of the body of 
John Grove late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict 
that, about 4 p.m. on 4 August last past Henry Snellying late of 
London yoman, and late the servant of Sir Morice Dennys knt., 
was in God's and the King's and Queen's peace at Clerkenwell afore- 
said, in the highway leading to Islyngton, when John Grove, armed 
with a sword and buckler assaulted him with the intention of wound- 
ing him ; and that, after retreating from his assailant, even to a diche 
in the same highway, near Sejmt John's Wall, and doing his utmost 
to escape from the affray so forced upon him, Henry Snellyng, fight- 
ing in lawful self-defence, with a sword gave John Grove on his right 
leg above the knee a mortal blow, of which he then and there died 
instantly. G. D. R., ■. . . . i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

22 November, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at West- 
minster on the said day, Henry ap- William alias Henry Williams late 
of the said city yoman, between the hours of six and seven p.m., broke 
into the mansion-house " cujusdam gutterolopis " of the Lord Steward 
of the said King at Westminster, and stole therefrom a box of wood 
worth three shillings and fourpence, an iron caskett worth twenty 
shiUings being witliin the aforesaid wooden box, a silk purse worth five 
shillings, forty-eight pistelettes of gold worth fourteen pounds and six- 
teen shillings, three French crowns of gold worth nineteen shillings, 
thirty-six Spanyshe royalles of silver worth eight pounds and sixteen 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said ' Gutterolopis ' at West- 
minster : and Further that William Apheughe Aprobert late of West- 
minster yoman was an accomplice in the said felony before its commis- 
sion, and a receiver of the said chattels and money after they were 
stolen. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Henry-ap- William and William 
Apheuge asked for the book, read like clerks, and were delivered to 
the Ordinary. G. D. R., .' . . . 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

24 Februauy, I & 2 Philip and Mary. — ^True Bill that, Robert 
Lawton alias Lawson, Anthony Evance and Ralph Taillour, all late of 
London yomen, stole a browne-blewe coat faced with damaske worth 
three pounds, a leather purse worth sixteen pence, twenty-six shillings 
in numbered money, a man's cloak " of the new colour " worth twenty 
shillings &c. &c., of the goods, chattels and moneys of William Bar- 
lowe of London citizen and clothworker. G. S. P. R., . . . . 
I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

3 April, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Tottenham 
Highecrosse co. Midd. on the said day, John Porter late of London 



22 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

yoman entered the dwellinghouse of John Stooe and stole therefrom a 
woollen-cloth coat " coloris blodii" worth twenty shillings, a woollen- 
cloth coat " coloris marble " worth twenty shillings, a doublet of 
"milleyn fustyan " worth nine shillings and sixpence, "a jerkyn of 
buckes leather " worth fourteen shillings, three pairs of white woollen 
cloth breeches worth twelve shillings, a sword worth six shillings and 
eightpence, another sword worth six shillings and eightpence, a dagger 
worth two and eightpence, a pair of gloves worth eightpence, and a comb 
worth twopence, of the goods and chattels of John Stooe. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, i & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

I May, I & 2 Philip and Mary.— True Bill that, on the said day 
and at divers other times John Bartholmewe of Saynte Mary Spytle co. 
Midd. gentleman, otherwise styled John Bartylmewe of Saynte Mary 
Spytle taylor, made, coined and counterfeited three pieces of false 
money of false and mixed metal, viz. of copper and tin and other 
false metals, of the likeness and size of the current ' testornes ' (simili- 
tudinis et magnitudinis currentium Testorum Anglie vocatorum tes- 
tornes), the value of each of which ' testornes ' of good copper and 
lawful money is sixpence; and that having so made, coined and 
counterfeited the said ' testornes,' he put them forth and uttered them 
for true and lawful money at Norton Foldegate : And Further that, 
knowing a certain Charles Dymok late of London yoman had feloni- 
ously made, coined and fabricated in the likeness of true money at 
Upcote CO. Devon, four pieces called Pystolates of false and mixed 
rnetal, viz. of copper and tin and other false mixed metals, the afore- 
said John Bartholmewe received, harboured and comforted the same 
Charles at Saynt Mary Spytle. I.E.., . . . a & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

12 May, I & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day 
at Popler, Nicholas Lott late of Popler waterman assaulted John New- 
land late of the same place, and with ' a bote hooke ' gave him on the 
fore part of his head a mortal blow, of which he then and there died. 
I. R., 30 June, I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

22 May, I & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Highholburn 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Richard Bentley of Holburn aforesaid 
baker with "a byll" assaulted John Lyon then and still being Mayor 
of the City of London, when the same John Lyon in the execution of 
his office was weighing the same Richard Bentley's loaves of bread, 
even as all Mayors of London from time immemorial have been 
accustomed to weigh the loaves of bakers in, Holburn; and that by so 
assaulting him, Richard Bentley hindered and obstructed the same 
Mayor of London in the execution of his said office. I. R., 29 May, 
I & 2 Phil, and Mary. 

I June, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Shoreditch on 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 23 

the said day, Richard Smyth of Shoreditch yoman seditiously and pub- 
Hcly uttered these words, viz. ' That the Quene is dead,' in disregard 
of the Act of Parhament of i & 2 PhiUp and Mary against spreading 
false reports respecting the said King or Queen. The judgment of the 
Court, delivered on 5 July, i & 2 PhiUp and Mary, at Westminster, 
being that the said Richard Smyth be put in the pillory in the public 
market-place, that both his ears be cut off within the next month, that 
he pay a fine of one hundred pounds to the use of the said King and 
Queen, and further remain in prison for three months. G. D. R., 
- . . . 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

18 June, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said 
day, Richard Drewrye baker, John Welshe, John Faith, John Phettey (?) 
yoman, all four of the city of Westminster, together with some ten 
unknown persons riotously and by force took possession of a certain 
cottage in Westminster, belonging to the Dean and Chapter of the 
cathedral church of St. Peter, and having thus unlawfully dispossessed 
the said Dean and Chapter of their said cottage still keep them out 
of it. I. R., TS Jan., 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

26 June, i & 2 Philip and Mary. — True Bill thatj.at Edgeware on 
the said day, John Heme late of Edgeware co. Midd. taylor, assaulted 
his wife with a brome, and kicked her on the right side under the ribs, 
and by so kicking her gave her a mortal blow of which she languished 
till the seventh day of the following July, when she died from the said 
blow : — the particulars of the murder being thus given in the language 
of the bill, " Johannes Heme &c. &c. vi et armis, scilicet cum uno 
scopo vocato a brome in quandam Johannam Heme nuper vxorem 
predicti Johannis Heme apud Edgware predictam insultum fecit ac 
ipsam Johannam cum pedibus suis super dextrum latus subter costas 
ejusdem Johanne tunc, et ibidem felonice percussit, dans eidem Johanne 
tunc et ibidem cum pedibus suis predictis vnum ictum sine plagam 
mortalem de quo quidem icto (sic) sine plaga raortali predicta Johanna 
apud Edgeware predictam in comitatu predicto a predicto xxvi'° die 
Junii vsque vii"". diem Julii annis &c. predictis in comitatu predicto 
languebat quo quidem vii°. die Julii &c. predicta Johanna &c. &c. de 
ictu sine plaga predicta obiit." I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

14 July, i & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said day, at 
the parish of St. Giles-in-the- Fields, Ethelbert Warner late of Pitstorne 
CO. Bucks, taylor, stole a silver-gilt chalice worth fifty-two shillings, a 
red velvet vestment worth forty shillings, a blue satin vestment worth 
twenty-six shillings and eight pence, and two linen albes worth . . . ., 
of the goods and chattels of the parishioners of the parish-church of 
Pytstorne aforesaid, in the custody of Henry Walker and William Pyng 
guardians of the goods and ornaments of the said parish-church, 



24 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

then being in the parish of St. Gyles-in-the-Fields. I. R., . . • 

2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

17 August, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary.— True Bill that, at High 
Holborn co. Midd. on the said day, Simon Cosyn, late of Saffron Wal- 
den CO. Essex yoman, stole and carried away a cope of redde sylke 
worth thirty-six shillings and eight pence, an aulter cloth of lynen worth 
twelve pence, " unum indumentum de panno lineo vocatum an awlbe of 
lynen cloth " worth six shillings and eight pence, " vnam amiseam de 
panno lineo vocatam an ames of lynen cloth '' worth two shillings, a 
sacring bell worth two pence, and a piece of linen cloth called ' 'a cor- 
porasse cloth " worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the 
parishioners of the parish-church of Arkesden co. Essex, in the custody 
of George Louve and William Taillour, guardians of the goods and 
ornaments of the aforesaid church at High Holborn co. Midd. I. R., 
20 Sept., 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

12 September, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Bunhill 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Nycholas Palmer late of London tayllour 
assaulted James A'Chaulton, and with a sword murdered the same 
James. Nicholas Palmer put himself ' Guilty,' and subsequently 
received pardon by Letters Patent, dated i May, 3 & 4 Phil, and 
Mary. I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

29 September, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said 
day at Uxbridge and other places, John Lorkyng late of Stanmer co. 
Midd. laborer bought of certain unknown persons a quarter of wheat and 
regrated the same, against the peace of the said King and Queen, and 
against the form of the statute in a matter of this kind published an 
provided. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

29 September, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the 
said day at Uxbridge co. Midd. a certain .... bought a quarter 
of wheat of certain persons unknown and regrated the same. G. S. P. R. 
Michaelmas, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

26 October, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Simon 
Cofyn late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the 
said Simon died on the same day within the gaol by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 20 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

I November, j2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at 
Wyncherhill near Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, Robert 
Nicholas late of London yoman stole a cow " coloris Redd Brandon " 
worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas Grey of 
St. Eddes co. Huntyngton. With four other True Bills against Robert 
Nicholas for stealing cows on the same day at Edmonton. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Robert Nicholas asked for the book, read like a clerk, 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 2$ 

and was delivered to the Ordinary. I. R., 7 December, 2 & 3 Phil, 
and Mary. 

lo November, 2 & 3 Philip and Masy. — True Bill that, on the 
said day in the highway at Gonnerby co. Lincoln, Dionisius Thymbleby 
gentleman, Stephen Corlycke yoman, Michael Burded yoman and John 
Graye yoman, all four of Grantham co. Lincoln, made an assault on 
John Oker gentleman, one of the receivers of the said King and 
Queen in the county of Lincoln, and on John Morres, servant of the 
said John Oker, and so maltreated them that their lives were despaired 
of, and bound them hand and foot with cords, and robbed them of 
two hundred pounds in numbered money, of the goods and chattels 
moneys of the said King and Queen, then being in the custody of the 
said John Oker at Gonnerbye ; and that on the 15th and i6th of 

the same month at Islynton co. Midd Postlett feloniously 

entertained the aforesaid Nicholas Burded at a common inn called 
The Crowne, and feloniously received of him forty marks, part of the 
said two hundred pounds. G. S. P. R., Easter, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

13 November, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — ^True Bill that, at 
Shordyche on the said day, Elizabeth Apriseley late of London spynster 
stole four pounds six shillings and eightpence in numbered money, 
a black worsted kyrtle worth twenty shillings, a red woollen woman's 
petycote worth ten shillings, a pair of worsted shoes worth two 
shillings and four pence, a black worsted apron worth five shillings, five 
linen neckerchers . worth five shillings, six linen kerchers worth fifteen 
shillings, nine linen rayles worth eighteen shillings, five linen cappe- 
clothes worth twelve shillings, one pair of fustean sleeves worth twenty 
pence, four linen aprons worth three shillings, &c. of the goods and 
chattels of Walter Jhones at Shordyche co. Midd. aforesaid. Putting 
herself ' Guilty/ Elizabeth Apriseley pleaded pregnancy (plit' pregn'). 
I. R., 23 March, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

14 November, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Edel- 
meton co. Midd. on the said day, Andrew Cooke and John Smyth, 
both late of Tottenham co. Midd. bochers, stole twelve sheep called 
wethers, of the goods and chattels of Henry Cade. Andrew Cooke 
put himself ' Guilty.' I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

15 November, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at West- 
minster on the said day, Arnold Symon late of London yoman stole 
eleven longe bowes, worth twenty-four shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of the Ear! of Pembroke. I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

29 November, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Shor- 
dyche CO. Midd. on the said day, George Ector late of London yoman 
stole a brown ox worth twenty-six shillings and eight-pence, and another 
ox of the same colour worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels 



26 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

of Clementes Siceley of Estham co. Essex gentlewoman. George 
Ector put himself 'Guilty.' I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

3 December, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Hamp- 
stead (stc) co. Midd. on the said day, John Hanbrooke late of London 
yoman assaulted Margaret Adamson "et ipsam Margaretam contra 
voluntatem suam rapuit et carnaliter cognovit." I. R., 7 Dec, 2 & 3 
Phil, and Mary. 

21 December, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at 
Uxbridge on the said day between five and six p.m., George Hopperton 
late of London yoman broke into the house of a certain John Rayner 
and stole therefrom two silver goblettes parcell-gilt worth four pounds 
thirteen shillings and four pence, a parcell-gilt silver cup with a cover 
worth three pounds six shillings and eightpence, a parcell-gilt silver 
salt-cellar worth three pounds six shillings and eight pence, six 
parcell-gilt silver spoons worth forty shillings, and a linen - cloth 
pillowber worth twenty pence. Putting himself ' Guilty,' George 
Hopperton had judgment. G. D., . . . . 2 & 3 Phil, and 
Mary. 

24 December, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at West- 
minster on the said day, Peter Williams late of London yoman stole a 
silver-gilt goblet worth fifty-three shillings and four pence, of the goods 
and chattels of Thomas Sponer of London goldsmyth. Putting him- 
self ' Guilty,' Peter Williams had judgment. G. D., .... 2 & 
3 Phil, and Mary. 

31 January, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the 
said day at the town (apud villam) of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, Geoffrey 
Condytt late of London yoman stole and took away a woman's russet 
frock worth five shillings, a linen apron worth a shilling, three linen 
rayles worth three shillings, found there and being of the goods and 
chattels of some unknown person. I. R., 21 Feb., 2 & 3 Phil, and 
Mary. 

19 February, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at West- 
minster CO. Midd. on the said day, Edward Wylgres late of the 
said city fyshemonger enticed a certain Thomas Pratt gentleman into 
playing unlawful and prohibited games, and played with him at the 
said games for a sum of four shillings and fourpence, he (the said 
Edward Wylgres) having with him in his left hand false dice that at 
every fall of the dice came forth at his pleasure ; and that by secretly 
removing the true dice and play with these false dice, Edward Wylgres 
despoiled and defrauded Thomas Pratt of the aforesaid sum of four 
shillings and four pence. I. R. 4 March, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

22 February, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — ^True Bill that, on the 
said day, John Webbe yoman, John Smythe yoman, and Peter Harrison 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 2/ 

yoman, all three late of London, assaulted a certain Richard Lea on the 
highway at the Tyburne (apud le tyburne) in the parish of Paddington, 
and so beat, wounded and maltreated him that his life was despaired of, 
and then and there robbed him of a girdle worth two shillings, a dagger 
worth five shillings, " vnum galerum called a Spanyshe Felte " worth 
three shillings and four pence, and twenty shillings of numbered money 
in a leather purse worth one halfpenny. I. R., 4 March, 2 & 3 Phil, 
and Mary. 

7 March, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at one a.m. in 
the night of the said day, William Tyndall late of Monken Hadleighe 
CO. Midd. gentleman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of 
Isabell Rolf widow at Enfelde co. Midd., then being and resting in 
the said house, and stole therefrom a silver gilt girdle worth forty 
shillings, a pair of sylver hookes worth five shillings, " unam fibulam 
argenti " worth two shillings, two sylver pynnes worth five shillings, a 
silver ring worth two shillings and eightpence, two pairs of kerchers 
worth thirty shillings, two pairs of gloves worth six shillings, three linen 
handkerchers worth three shillings and four pence, three doble rayles 
worth fifteen shillings, a linen pillowbere worth sixteen pence, and ten 
pounds in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of the 
said Isabell Rolf ; And Further that William Reynoldes of Monken 
Hadleighe aforesaid smyth, and John Joyner, alias Slyon, alias Jones 
of the same parish yoman, on the sixth day of March, 2 & 3 Philip 
and Mary, were aiders and abettors to the said burglary. Wil- 
liam Tyndall and John Slyon were sentenced to be hung : pleading 
his clergy, William Reynolds was burnt on the hand and delivered to 
the Ordinary. G. D., . . . . 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

17 March, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Kyngesland 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Baylie late of London yoman stole 
a bay horse, worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, of the goods and 
chattels of an unknown man. At the foot of the bill, a Memorandum 
that on his arraignment on 20th of April next following, Thomas 
Baylie put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, and was delivered to 
the Ordinary. I. R., . • • • 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

21 March, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on view of the 
body of Laurence Awnsell late of the said parish cobler : With 
Verdict that, on the 20th instant in his dwelling-house within the said 
parish, the said Lawrence Awnsell and his wife Elena Awnsell, other- 
wise styled Elena Awnsell spynster, exchanged bitter and exasperating 
words, by reason of which opprobrious speech they passed from words 
to blows and fought one another on equal terras (adtunc et ibidem 
pariter pugnabant), and that in the affray the said Elena, by the mis- 



2'8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

chance called Chance Medley, with a knife gave the said Laurence 
under his breast a mortal blow, of which he then and there died 
instantly. G. D. R., 20 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

24 March, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert 
Eger, late of Hornettystell co. York yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that the said Robert Eger died on the aforesaid day within the 
gaol by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 20 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

28 March, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Kentysh- 
towne on the said day, William White late of Watforde co. Midd., 
stole a gray gelding, of the goods and chattels of Anthony Townesley. 
Patting himself ' Not Guilty,' William White did not retract ; but all 
the same he had judgment. I. R., 30 June, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

7 April, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary.— True Bill that, at Westmin- 
ster on the said day, George Abarrowe broke into the close and house 
of Robert Davys, and stole therefrom a grey gelding worth five pounds. 
Memorandum on the bill, that George Abarrowe put himself ' Guilty,' 
on his arraignment 20 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

21 April, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Ralph 
Hagas alias George Copley, there lying dead : With Verdict that the 
same Hagas alias Copley died on the said day within the gaol by 
Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 20 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

21 April, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Cowley co. 
Midd. on the said day, James Priour late of the said parish yoman 
stole a brown cow worth thirty shillings, and a red cow worth thirty- 
three shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of John 
Amps of Barton co. Bedd. Taken at the Olde Wolstaple alias Woo- 
staple, Westminster. With clerical Memorandum at the foot of the 
bill that afterwards, viz. on i May, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary, James 
Priour put himself ' Guilty,' had no chattels, asked for the book, read 
like a clerk, was burnt on the hand and delivered to the Ordinary. 
I. R., 24 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

. . . ., 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, on the said 
day at Saynt Jones Strete co. Midd., Richard Washeburne late of 
Suckeley co. Hertford yoman stole a grey gelding, worth four pounds 
six shillings and eightpence, of the goods and chattels of William 
Bynt. Taken at Westminster before Justices (whose names are no 
longer legible on the wrapper of the roll) at the Olde Wolstaple in 
Westminster, on 24 April, 2 & 3 Phil. & Mary. — At the bill's foot a 
clerical memorandum that on the 6th of May next following, Richard 
Washeburne put himself ' Guilty,' had no chattels, and was sentenced 
to be hung. I. R., 24 April, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 29 

27 May, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, within the liberty of the 
City of Westminster, on view of the body of Richard Egleston late of 
London marchaunte taylour, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
the 26th inst. at the said parish in a certain field called St. Martyn's 
Felde, Richard Egleston aforesaid was in God's and the Queens' 
peace, when John Hare late of Westminster yoman assaulted him, and 
murdered him by giving him with a sword under his breast a mortal 
blow, of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 
3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

23 June, 2 & 3 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Highe 
Holborne on the said day, John Ryce late of Rysing co. Norfolk 
yoman and Cristofer Clerke late of Otley co. York yoman, stole a gray 
gelding worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of a certain un- 
known man. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum " P' . Joh'es 
Ryce po se ve fa Cull ca null: — h' et judic' ad Sus' p' Coll." — "The 
aforesaid John Ryce puts himself ' Guilty ' of the fact, has no chattels, 
has judgment to be hung by the neck." Similar memorandum 
touching Christofer Clerke. I. R., 30 June, 2 & 3 Phil, and Mary. 

25 August, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition- 
post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of 
Henry Kinge late of Westminster yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that the said Henry Kinge died on the said day within the 
Gaol by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

27 August, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken at St. Giles's-without-Creplegate co. Midd., on view of 
the body of Robert Webberton inholder, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that the said Robert Webberton on the 26th inst. died suddenly, 
whilst making hay in a certain field, called Fyve Acres Felde in 
the parish of Shorediche. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

1 2 October, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Short- 
dyche co. Midd. on the said day, William Lamberd late of London 
yoman stole a leather purse called " a lockt purse " worth two shillings, 
of the good and chattels of Richard Gylbye. At the foot of the bill, 
a memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery of nth of December next 
following, William Lamberd put himself ' Guilty,' and was reprieved ; 
and that on the i6th day of the same December he was sentenced to 
be hung. L R., . . . • 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

22 January, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Inquest held before Sir 
Robert Rochester knt. coroner &c. on view of the body of John 
Harres, late of the city of Westminster, there lying dead : With the 
Jurors' Verdict that, on the night of the said day, between the hours of 
six and seven, the said John Harres being drunk (existens ebrius), 



30 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

whilst walking " et vadens per alveuni molendarii Abbatie beati Petri 
Westnionasterii vocatum the Abbey mylne dame .... subito et 
improvise sespitabat titubabat et cadebat in aquam Aluei molendinarii 
predicti .... racione ebrietatis sue predicte " ; the result being 
that he was then and there drowned in the mill-dam. G. D. R., 28 May, 
3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

2 February, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at 
Todington co. Midd. in a certain meadow near the Thames, Robert 
Mareshall, late of Kingston-upon-Thames laborer, assaulted William Lan- 
caster and murdered him by giving him divers mortal wounds with " an 
hedginbyll," of which wounds he then and there died instantly ; and that, 
having so murdered him, the said Robert Mareshall threw the body of 
the same William Lancaster into the said river. Robert Mareshall put 
himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. I. R., 7 April, 3 & 4 
Phil, and Mary. 

4 February, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at South- 
mymes co. Midd. on the said day, John Pears alias Bote alias 
Phillippes and George Shurley, both late of London yomen, stole a 
parcel-gilt silver chalice worth four pounds, a vestment called "an 
albe " worth five pounds, another vestment called " an albe " worth five 
pounds, another vestment called " a decon " worth forty shillings, an 
ornament called " a corporas case " worth four shillings, a covering 
called " a coporas clothe " worth sixteen pence, of the goods and 
chattels of the parishioners of Hadenham co. Bucks, in the keeping 
of George Colyngridge and Robert Viner wardens of the parish church 
of Hadenham aforesaid. John Pears and George Shurley put them- 
selves ' Guilty,' and were sentenced to be hung. I. R., 7 April, 3 & 4 
Phil, and Mary. 

10 March, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, William 
Wickes late of London yoman and Elizabeth Gondye late of the same 
place spinster, made and counterfeited of false metals viz. " de cupro 
ere et alcumina " five several coins in the likeness of the current coins 
of the aforesaid King and Queen called " half shillinges," and having so 
made the said false coins uttered them on the aforesaid day to Thomas 
Bragg of Kensington yoman. ^ — Memorandum at the foot of the bill 
that, on being brought to trial on 2 December, 4 & 5 Philip and 
Mary, they were found guilty of uttering, but acquitted of making 
the said false coins : the judgment (delivered on 7 January 4 & 5 
Philip and Mary) being that they should forfeit all their goods, 
chattels, lands and tenements and remain in prison during .... 
With further memorandum, on the dorse of the bill, that at the 
Session held at Fynnesbury, 31 August i Elizabeth, before Ralph 
Chomeiey and John Southcott serjeant-at-law, and Robert Chidley and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 3 1 

John Marshe esqs., the aforesaid William Wickes and Elizabeth Gondye 
pleaded the Queen's General pardon, and prayed successfully that it 
might be allowed to them. I. R., . . . 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

28 March, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Robert 
Whorlpole late of Chippingbarnet co. Midd. yoman, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that the said Robert died in the gaol on the said 
day, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 7 April, 3 & 4 Phil, and 
Mary. 

5 April, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John 
Semer late of Newbery co. Book, gentleman ; With Verdict that the 
said John died in the gaol on the 4th inst., by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 7 April, 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

19 April, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken at Clerkenwell co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Richard Greynfylde late of the same parish, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, at the said parish on the aforesaid day, the said Richard 
committed suicide by throwing himself "in aquam vulgariter vocat' 
darken Well " in the said parish and thus of his own will drowning 
himself. G. D. R., 28 May, 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

25 April, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, Anthony 
Leigh late of London gentylman, and Edward Bray late of Pavenham 
CO. Bedd. gentylman, at about the second hour of the night of the 
aforesaid day broke burglariously into the mansion-house of William 
Longe at the parish of Savoye co. Midd., and put Charles Draper and 
Richard Lambe, servants of the same William Longe there being, 
in great fear, and stole therefrom five parcel-gilt silver goblets worth 
eighteen pounds four shillings and six pence, " et vnum ciphum argen- 
teum deauratum vocatum a bowle of syluer all gilte " worth four 
pounds and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of the said William 
Longe at the parish of Savoye aforesaid. G. D. R., 28 May, 3 & 4 
Phil, and Mary. 

30 April, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Thomas 
Underwood late of London maryner : With Verdict that the said 
Thomas died in the gaol on the same day, by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 28 May, 3 & 4 Phil, and Mary. 

4 May, 3 & 4 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken at Harrow Hill co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Henry Slancke late of the said parish tayller ; With Verdict that, 
about 10 p.m. of the night of the 2nd inst. at the said parish, in a 
field' there called Hill Close or Baken's Close, the said Henry Slancke 



32 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

at the instigation of the devil committed suicide, by hanging himself 
with a girdle, worth a farthing. G. D. R., 28 May, 3 & 4 Phil, and 
Mary. 

24 October, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition- 
post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of 
Katerine Edmonton late of Paddington spinster, then and there lying 
dead : With Verdict that she died on the 21st inst. within the gaol by 
Divine Visitation. G. D. E.., 30 March, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

15 November, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, in 
Westminster Hall and in the Court of the Common Bench within the 
same hall, between ten and eleven a.m. of the said day, whilst the 
judges were there sitting, John Broke late of London gentleman stole 
a handkercher and twenty shiUings in numbered money, of the goods 
chattels and moneys of William Smythe clerk. At the foot of the bill, 
a memorandum that, on 2 Dec. 4 & S Phil, and Mary, John Broke 
put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, read like a clerk, was burnt on 
the hand and delivered to the Ordinary. I. R., . . . . 4 & 5 
Phil, and Mary. 

17 November, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, in the 
highway at Maribone co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas {sic) Went- 
worthe gentleman, Hugh Lloyd yoman and John Eton yoman, all 
three late of London, assaulted William Wylson and robbed him of 
a dagger worth six shillings and eightpence. All three robbers put 
themselves ' Guilty,' and were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 13 
Dec, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

17 November, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, in the 
highway at Maribone on the said day, Francis {sic) Wentworth gentle- 
man, Hugh Lloyde yoman and John Eton yoman, all late of London, 
assaulted William Wyllson, put him in fear of his life and robbed 
him of a dagger, worth six shillings and eightpence, of the goods and 
chattels of the same William Willson. At the foot of the bill, a memo- 
randum that all three defendants put themselves ' Guilty,' and had 
judgment. G. D. R., 13 Dec, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

10 December, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Shor- 
diche on the said day, Richard Pagett late of London yoman stole a 
bay mare worth forty shillings, a black leather saddle worth three 
shillings, and a bridle worth two shillings and three pence, of the 
goods and chattels of John Stevenson. Po se cul. G. D. R., 30 
March, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

18 December, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at 
Holowaye co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Mason late of London 
yoman stole a coverlet for a bedd worth five shillings, two payres of 
shetes worth eight shillings, and two towelles worth twenty pence, of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 33 

the goods and chattels of Hugh Payne. Po se cul. G. D. R., 30 
March, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

24 December, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at 
Islyngton co. Midd. on the said day, John Nycols late of London 
yoman stole a bay mare worth twenty shillings, a black woollen-cloth 
coat worth eight shillings, two silver salts with silver covers worth 
four pounds, and a gold ring worth forty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Robert Darrell. Po se cul. G. D. R., 30 March, 4 & 5 
Phil, and Mary. 

13 February, 4 & s Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Seinte 
John Strete in the parish of Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, 
William Greneway late of London yoman stole " unum tormentum 
vocat' a frenche corio'. " worth twenty-six shillings and eightpence, of 
the goods and chattels of an unknown man, then in the custody of one 
William Gawyn. Po se cul. G. D. R., 30 March, 4 & 5 Phil, and 
Mary. 

3 March, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of John 
Foster late of Paddington yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the said John Foster died within the gaol on the same day by 
Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 30 March, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

20 March, 4 & s Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post- 
mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Margaret 
Davys, there lying dead : With Verdict that she died within the gaol 
on the same day, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 30 March, 4 & 5 
Phil, and Mary. 

26 March, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mor- 
tem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Peers 
late of St. Giles's-in-the-Field co. Midd. yoman : With Verdict that he 
died within the gaol on the same day by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 
30 March, 4 & 5 Phil, and Mary. 

18 May, 4 & s Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, at Clerkenwell 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Kerby and Walter Cocker alias 
Cockerell, both late of London yomen, stole a white gelding worth 
forty shillings, a bay gelding worth forty shillings, a shirt worth three 
shillings, a woollen-cloth cloak worth twenty shillings, a sword worth 
four shillings, a girdle worth two shillings, a pair of boots worth four 
shillings, and eleven shillings in numbered money, of the goods 
chattels and moneys of Oliver Withington. Both prisoners put them- 
selves ' Guilty.' I. R., . . . . 4 & S Phil, and Mary. 

9 June, 4 & 5 Philip and Mary. — True Bill that, in the highway 
leading from Acton to London, George JFoscum late of London yoman, 
with divers unknown persons, assaulted Henry Follantyne of Harrowe- 

D 



34 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

on-the-Hill yoman, and robbed him of a sword worth four shillings, 
a dagger worth three shillings, and a swerdegirdell worth twelve 
pence. Putting himself 'Guilty,' George Foscum was sentenced to 
be hung. G. D. R., n July, 4 & 6 Phil, and Mary. 



8 January, i ELIZABETH.— True Bill that, at Wyllesdon co. 
Midd. on the said day, Henry Barnes late of London yoman stole a 
woman's woollen gown worth thirteen shillings, a woman's petycote 
worth six shillings and eight pence, a linen shete worth two shillings, 
four linen kerchers worth three shillings and four pence, a payre of 
silver hookes worth sixteen pence, two silver rings worth twenty pence, 
two silver pins worth twenty pence, and an apron worth twelve pence, 
of the goods and chattels of John Chylde. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
Henry Barnes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., .... May, 
I Elizabeth. 

12 January, i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Ayehill co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Addyson bocher and 
Hugh Mychell yoman, both late of London, assaulted John Austen of 
Launston co. Cornwall, and robbed him of sixty pounds in a leather 
purse. — At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that Richard Addyson 
and Hugh Mychell were sentenced to be hung. G. D., .... 
i Eliz. 

20 February, i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmylstreyt co. 
Midd. on the said day, Edward Edwardes late of London yoman stole 
and carried off a man's fryse coat worth eight shillings, and a man's 
blewe woollen-cloth jacket worth three shilUngs, and a linen shirt 
worth twenty pence, of the goods and chattels of Bartholomew Kemp- 
sail of Turmyllstrete aforesaid. — At the foot of the bill a memo- 
randum that the said Edward Edwardes put himself ' Guilty,' asked for 
the book, read like a clerk, and was committed to the Ordinary. G. D., 
.... I Eliz. 

4 May, I Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Clement- 
Danes CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Shawe ak'as Stanley late of 
London yoman stole two silver goblettes worth eight pounds, and two 
silver spoons worth thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
William Cockes. — At the foot of the bill, a Memorandum that, on his 
arraignment on . . . . th of May in the Justice Hall in the Old 
Bailey, Thomas Shawe put himself ' Guilty,' and asked for the book, 
whereupon it was pleaded for the Lady the Queen that he had been 
burnt on the hand in former time, to which Thomas Shawe replied 
that he was not the same person who was so burnt ; and a Jury 
having found at the Gaol Delivery of 14 Dec. 2 Eliz. that he was the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 35 

same convicted clerk, so burnt in the hand on a previous occasion, he 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . May, i Eliz. 

13 May, I Elizabeth. — Trae Bill that, at Stratford-at-Bowe on the 
said day, Margaret Humfrey late of London spynster, stole twelve 
shillings of numbered money in a box, five kerchers and four rayles 
worth six shillings and eightpence, two linen aprons worth twelve 
pence, a silk cuffe worth four pence, and one pair of woman's stock- 
ings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Harvye of Estham co. 
Essex fyssherman. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Margaret Humfrey 
pleaded her pregnancy. G. D. R., . . . . May, i Eliz. 

20 May, I Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at the 
lordship of Wallockes Berne in the parish of St. Giles-without-Creple- 
gate CO. Midd., William Davys late of London yoman stole five spades 
worth ten shillings, and one other piece of iron called a coulter worth 
six shillings and eightpence of the goods and chattels of William 
Austen " apud dominium de Wallockes heme." Pleading his clergy, 
William Da%7s was burnt in the hand and delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., . . . . May, i Elizabeth. 

26 September, 1 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Wallockes Barne 
CO. Midd. on the said day, William Baynard late of London cook 
stole ten shillings and tenpence in numbered money of the goods 
and moneys of Richard Skelton of Dunstable co. Beds., then being 
in the custody of James Tye of Dunstable aforesaid maltman. Put- 
ting himself 'Guilty,' William Bajmard was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 7 Oct, I Eliz. 

27 September, i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Isseldon co. 
Midd. on the said day, Edward Cowke late of Westminster yoman 
assaulted John Pap worth on the highway, and robbed him of a 
sword worth five shillings, a felte hat, and a leather purse containing 
twenty pence in numbered money. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Edward 
Cowke was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., i Eliz. 

1 October, i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Laleham co. Midd. 
on the said day and before and afterwards, Thomas Ranyer of Lyttle- 
ton CO. Midd. yoman kept a certain Elizabeth Goldock of Laleham 
spynster as his concubine at Laleham aforesaid, and lived with her 
in adultery. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i Eliz. 

2 October, i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Cowley co. Midd. on 
the said day, Alexander Raynford late of Rypley co. Kent yoman stole 
" vnum coopertorium vocat' a bed kyveringe " worth two shillings, and 
a pair of flaxen shetes worth three shillings and four pence, of the 
goods and chattels of Roger Burton of Harlington. — At the foot of 
the bill a memorandum that the said Alexander put himself ' Guilty,' 
and asked for the book (viz. at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, 7 Oct., 



36 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

1 Eliz.) ; when the matter was deferred " quia sedes episcopalis jam vacat 
ita vt competens ordinarius non aderat." Afterwards at the Session 
held on 3 Jan., 2 EHz., the prisoner read like a clerk, was burnt on the 
hand, and handed over to the Ordinary. — At the same Session of 3 
Jan., 2 Eliz., John Crowcher late of Keston co. Midd. shereman, who 
had at a previous Session acknowledged himself guilty of cattle-steal- 
ing was unable to save his neck by reading a verse. " Non legit vt 
clericus," runs the memorandum at the foot of his bill of indictment : 
" Ideo judicatum est quod suspendatur per collum." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 
I Eliz. 

19 September, 2 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition -post-mortem, 
taken at Hill Felde in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, on view 
of the body of a certain unknown man, there lying dead : With Ver- 
dict that, on the 6th inst. between six and seven p.m., John Tyrrell alias 
Tayllour, late of London yoman, with other persons, in the said field 
assaulted the said unknown man, and that John Tyrrell aforesaid mur- 
dered him, by giving him with " a staffe of ashe " on the left part of 
his head a mortal blow, of which the same unknown man then and 
there died immediately. — On his arraignment John Tyrrell alias Tayl- 
lour put himself ' Not Guilty,' and did not retract ; wherefore it was 
adjudged that he Should go quit. Further it appears, from the Memor- 
andum at the foot of the bill, that the Jurors found, that John Sturfur- 
rowe of Ludlowe co. Salop husbandman murdered the said unknown 
man. G. D. R., . . . . Feb. 3 Eliz. 

30 November, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Radcliffe co. Midd. 
about six p.m. of the said day, Christopher Woodworthe, late of London 
yoman, broke into the house of Robert Hilorde yoman (the said Robert 
being in the house), and stole therefrom " unam zonam virilem de nigra 
Cruell ad valenciam ij^., vnam cruraenam virilem de corio albo ad 
valenciam \\\-\d., vnum annulum aureum cum lapide precioso in eodem 
infixo vocat' a dyamond ad valenciam xxx.?., vnum alium annulum 
aureum cum sole in eodem sculpto ad valenciam xxj-., vnum alium annu- 
lum aureum signator" ad valenciam xxx^., quatuor pecias monete anglie 
vulgariter nuncupatas Rose testours ad valenciam xviif., et xxxij-. xii 
in pecuniis numeratis in crumena predicta tunc existentes. " At the 
foot of the bill this memorandum — " Et predictus Christopher po se 
non cul nee se retraxit lo' judic' qd. eat inde quiet'." G. D. R., 
.... Feb., 3 Eliz. 

20 December, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at 
Enfyld co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Nursse and John Smyth, 
both late of London yomen, assaulted Richard Tuffenalle and robbed 
him of forty-seven shillings and eightpence, in a leather purse worth 
fourpence. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that, at the Session 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 37 

held at the Justice Hall on 17 January 3 Elizabeth, the said Thomas 
Nursse and John Smyth were sentenced to be hung. — Also, another 
True Bill against the same Thomas Nursse and John Smyth, for assault- 
ing Thomas Wylkinson on the same day, in the Highway at Edmonton, 
and then and there robbing him of a ' sackclothe ' purse, a pair of 
gloves worth two-pence, a girdle worth two -pence, and a dagger worth 
two shillings : — an indictment confessed by both robbers, who were 
forthwith sentenced to be hung. — These bills are followed on the 
file by a memorandum, that at the Gaol Delivery, held on 10 December 
4 Elizabeth before William Harper, Mayor of the city of London, 
and other Justices, the aforesaid Thomas Nursse pleaded the Queen's 
pardon of the said felonies, dated under the Great Seal on 6 October 
in the 3rd year of Her Majesty's reign ; and that at the Gaol Delivery, 
held on 20 February 4 Elizabeth, the aforesaid John Smyth pleaded 
the Queen's pardon of the same felonies, dated under the Great Seal 
on 3 December in the 4th year of Her Majesty's reign. G. D. R., 17 
& 18 Jan., 3 Eliz. 

20 December, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement Danes on the said day, Thomas Lloyd, late of London 
yoman, stole and carried off a silver goblet worth four pounds and 
ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Alice Folde of the afore- 
said parish widow. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that, at 
the Session held at the Justice Hall on 18 January 3 Elizabeth 
before Sir William Chester knt, Mayor of London, and other Justices, 
Thomas Lloyd put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, read like a 
clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 17 & 18 Jan., 
3 Eliz. 

28 December, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmylstrete co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Tylman alias Dericke 
locksmyth and John Dowdald yoman, both late of London, broke 
burglariously in the dwelling-house of Henry Walsted, and stole there- 
from ten pieces of gold called soueraynes worth five pounds (decern 
pecias auri voc' souera5mes ad valenciam quinque librarum), eight pieces 
of gold called pistilates worth fifty-three shillings and four pence, and 
nine pieces of gold called Frenche crownes worth fifty-four shillings, of 
the moneys of the said Henry Walsted. At the foot of the bill a 
memorandum that, at the Session held at the Justice Hall on 18 Janu- 
ary 3 Elizabeth before Sir William Chester, Mayor of London, and 
other Justices, the aforesaid Richard and John pleaded their clergy, 
but being unable to read were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 & 
18 Jan., 3 Eliz. 

I January, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes 
without the bars of the New Temple on the said day, Henry Gery, 



38 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

late of the said parish yoman, uttered and sold by retail by little mea- 
sure, viz. by the quart, five several quarts of Gascoyne wine to divers 
unknown persons, then and there receiving of them four pence in 
numbered money for each quart, at the rate of sixteen pence for every 
gallon, against the form of the Stat. 7 Edward VI., in that case pub- 
lished and provided. I. R., . . . . May, 3 Eliz. 

15 January, 3 Elizabeth. -^Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem^ 
taken within Newgate Goal on view of the body of Henry Dyckenson 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Henry died within the gaol on the said day, by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz. 

20 January, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, (whereas the citizens 
and other inhabitants of London have been accustomed from time 
beyond the memory of man to shoot with bows in all the open, fields 
in the parish of Stebbynhith co. Midd. and elsewhere near the said 
city, viz. in the common lands called Stebbynhyth feyldes, Ratclyff 
feyldes, Mylende feyldes, Blethnall grene, Spyttlefeildes, Morefeldes, 
Fynnesbury feyldes, Hoggesdon feyldes, co. Midd. without hindrance 
from any person, so that all archers have been able to go out in the 
same open fields to shoot with the bow and come out from them at 
pleasure, in such manner nevertheless that the said archers do no harm 
to growing corn nor to grass reserved for seed) John Draney citizen and 
clothier of the city of London has notwithstanding, on the aforesaid 
day, trenched in with deep ditches a certain open field called Stebbyn- 
hithe close and against custom has planted it with green hedges, in 
order that the said archers may no longer be able to enter, pass through 
and leave freely and at their pleasure the said field of Stebbynhithe Close. 
At the foot of the bill, a Memorandum that, at the Session of the 
Peace held at Westminster on 2 1 May next following, John Draney 
was fined twelve-pence. S. P. R 3 Elizabeth. 

22 January, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islyngton co. Midd. 
on the said day, William Aynesworthe, late of the said parish yoman, 
stole " a Buf skynne " worth nineteen shillings, a black woollen-cloth 
cloak worth thirty-three shillings and four pence, a felt hatt worth six 
shillings and eightpence, " vnam palliothecam vocat' a clokebagge de 
blak fustyan ad valenciam xx^." and a buckler worth six shillings and 
eight pence, of the goods and chattels of John Rolle gentleman. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Aynesworth asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . 
Feb., 3 Eliz. 

23 January, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the Queen's high- 
way at the Stonebridge in Shordyche co. Midd. on the said day, 
George Turke late of London gentleman assaulted Thomas Baker, and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 39 

robbed him of twenty-six pounds thirteen shillings and four pence in 
numbered money. At the head of the bill a memorandum that George 
Turke was sentenced to be hung.- — Also, a True Bill that, on the same 
day and at the same place (apud le Stonebridge in Shordiche co. 
Midd.), George Turke late of London gentleman assaulted Robert 
Whitney, and robbed him of twenty-two shillings in numbered money. 
At the head of the bill a memorandum that the said George Turke 
put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . 
Feb., 3 Eliz. 

26 January, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Knightsbridge co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, John Heywarde late of London 
yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Edward Yetton 
(the said Edward with his family being then and there at rest, in God's 
and the Queen's peace) and stole therefrom divers pieces of linen 
cloth worth forty shillings, four pewter disshes worth three shillings, " a 
kettell of bras " worth twenty-two pence, and six shillings and a penny 
and one halfpenny in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys 
of the said Edward Yetton. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Heywarde 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz. 

2 February, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St Giles's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Wykested late of London 
tapster stole a leather purse worth three pence, and seven pounds 
fifteen shillings and ten pence in numbered money, of the goods and 
moneys of John Wase. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum, 
" Et p'd Thomas po se cul ca null petit libru' legit vt cl'icus et traditur 
ordinar', &c.' G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz. 

16 February, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Ratcl)rf CO. Midd. on the said day, William Murifett and John Dawson, 
both late of London yomen, assaulted Edmund Kaye, when he was in 
God's and the Queen's peace, and that William Murfifett slew the same 
Edmund, by giving him in the belly with a sword a mortal blow, of 
which he died on the same day. Putting themselves ' Guilty ' on their 
arraignment, both prisoners pleaded their benefit of clergy, whereupon 
the book was delivered to them. Unable to read like a clerk, William 
Murifett was sentenced to be hung ; but John Dawson read like a 
clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 
3 Eliz. 

27 April, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Storye, late of London yoman, 
stole two parcel-gilt silver goblettes worth six pounds, of the goods and 
chattels of William Clarkeson. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas 
Storye asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the 
Ordinary. G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz. 



40 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

1 May, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordiche on the said day, 
John Tonge late of London yoman, stole three diaper table clothes 
worth twenty shillings, three linen towels worth three shillings and 
fourpence, a linen cuppord-clothe worth two shillings, six linen table- 
napkyns worth three shillings, eleven linen shirts worth three pounds 
thirteen shillings and fourpence, a linen pillowebere worth sixteen pence, 
six linen kercheves worth .... eight linen neckercheves worth 
twenty-six shillings and eightpence, a pair of linen sieves worth six 
shillings and eightpence, and five linen coverlets worth twenty-five 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Giles Allen gentleman. — Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' John Tonge asked for the book, read like a clerk, and 
was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz. 

12 May, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day Peter Welt- 
howe clerk, vicar of the parish church of Hillyngdon co. Midd. and 
Thomas Pyercye baker, Thomas Flye husbondman, Richard .... 

laborer, William Pynnar laborer, William Chapman gentleman, John 
Goste ......... Gape yoman, John Mannynge 

laborer, Robert Parke husbondman, Robert Carleton yoman, John 
Norrys yoman, Richard Clackham tailor, John Alaughton smyth, 
Thomas Vyncent smyth, Thomas Crosse ' yoman, Michael Welde alias 
Welles yoman, Thomas Bunbur horsecorser, John Annsell yoman, all 
late of Hillyngdon aforesaid, with swords and staves broke into a certain 
close of John Newdegate esq. at Herefeld co. Midd. called Cowe 
More, and trampled on the crop growing there, and dug up the soil, 
to the serious loss of the said John Newdegate. I. R., .... 

May, 3 Eliz. 

15 May, 3 Elizabeth.^ — True Bill that, Thomas Childe husbond- 
man, William Leighton yoman, William Glysson yoman, John Taylor, 

yoman, John Robynson Marlowe yoman, 

John Markes yoman, George Trowes yoman, John Gost .... 
yoman, Henry Cooke yoman, and John Wythewell yoman, alUate of 
Sunbery co. Midd., armed with swords, staves, hooks and pitchforks, 
broke riotously into a certain piece of waste, called Asheforde 
Marshe, parcel of the manor of Colkennyngton, and cut down three 
loads of wood there growing, and belonging to Francis Newdegate 
esq., to his serious loss. I. R., . . . . May, 3 Eliz. 

I August, 3 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Sowthemymes co. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Mosse of 
Sowthemymes aforesaid laborer : With Verdict that John Grysley of 
Sowthemymes laborer was together with other honest persons shooting 
with bows and arrows at two certain goals or butts of the aforesaid 
parish, on the .... day of . . . ., Thomas Mosse aforesaid 
being then and there present ; and that, unaware of Thomas Mosse's 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 4 1 

position, the said John Grysley drew his bow and sent from it a shaft 
that, by mischance striking the same Thomas Mosse in the neck, gave 
him a mortal blow, of which he died on the third day of ... . 
At the foot of the record a Memorandum that, on 10 April 4 Elizabeth, 
John Grysley appeared at this Session of Gaol Delivery, and pleaded 
the Queen's pardon of the involuntary homicide, granted to him under 
the Great Seal by letters patent, dated on the 13th of last February. 
G. D. R., 10 April, 4 Ehz. 

20 September, 3 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Holborne co. Midd. on view of the body of Lewis Howell, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that, at Holborne aforesaid on the 19th inst., 
Thomas Heweys late of same parish assaulted the same Lewis Howell, 
and murdered him by giving him with a dagger a mortal blow on his 
breast, of which he then and there died instantly. At the foot of the 
bill, a memorandum that on his arraignment Thomas Hewys put him- 
self ' Not Guilty,' when the Jury returned a verdict that he had 
been furiously assaulted by Lewis Howell, and had endeavoured to 
escape the affray so forced upon him, before in self-defence he killed 
the same Lewis : wherefore the said Thomas Hewys was committed to 
Gaol " ad graciam domine Regine expectandam." G. D. R., n Dec^ 
4 Eliz. 

12 October, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, for three months fol- 
lowing the said day and even till now, Henry Edlin late of Hendon 
CO. Midd. husbandman has had neither bow nor arrow for shooting, 
against the form of the statute in this case provided. 

15 October, 3 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at 
Marybone on the said day, Robert Durant, John Powell, Thomas 
Huntley and Roger Ratclyf, all late of Westminster yomen, assaulted 
and beat a certain unknown man, and robbed him of twenty pence in 
numbered money. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Robert Durant was 
reprieved without judgment, whilst John Powell and Roger Ratclyf 
were sentenced to be hung. No memorandum touching Huntley. At 
the foot of the bill, a memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery held on 
8 January 5 Elizabeth, the said Robert Durant brought into court the 
Queen's special pardon of his felony, dated under the Great Seal on 
I December 5 Elizabeth, and begged humbly that it might be allowed 
him. G. D. R., 11 Dec, Eliz. 

26 October, 3 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Stebenhuth co. Midd., on view of the body of Edmond 
Smythe late of Blackewall co. Midd. fisherman, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that the said Edmond died at Stebenhuth aforesaid on 
the 24th inst., between five and six p.m., by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 26 June, 4 Eliz. 



42 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

8 November, 3 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Robert Newman alias Coopey late of London 
yoman stole a sword worth thirty shillings and a dagger worth three 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Fyssher gentleman. At 
. the head of the bill, this memorandum — " Po se non cul nee se 
retraxit Id iudic qd eat inde quiet'." G. D. R., 11 Dec, 4 Eliz. 

28 November, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Katherine Harryson late of London spynster stole a woman's 
petiecote worth twenty shillings, a woman's cassock worth twenty shillings, 
a silk hat worth twenty shillings, and divers pieces of linen cloth worth 
two shillings and sixpence. Putting herself ' Guilty,' she pleaded preg- 
nancy : " Et postea " runs a memorandum at the foot of the bill, " scilt. 
ad sessionem hie tent xx"" die Februarii anno quarto supra dicto coram 
Willo' Harper milit' Maiore civitatis London' et sociis Justiciariis &c. 
compt' fuit per sacrm' matronarum qd p'dicta Katherina tunc pregnans 
fuit I'o repri' quousq' &c. Et postea scilt. ad Deliberacionem Gaole 
hie tent xxvi'° die Junii anno regni Regine Elizabeth quaito coram p'd' 
Willo Harper et sociis suis Justic' p'd comp't' fuit per sacrm matronarum 
qd p'd Katherina tunc non fuit p'gnans I'o cons' est per Cur' qd sus' 
per coUum." Found to be pregnant on 20 Feb. 4 Eliz. by a jury of 
matrons she was reprieved till the delivery of her child ; and subse- 
quently on 26 June 4 Eliz., being found not pregnant by a jury of 
matrons, she was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R. 11 Dec, 4 Eliz. 

I December, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, from the said day even 
until now, John Hardy, Reginald Melcher, Thomas Cornysshe, Peter 
. . . ., Nicholas Carleton, Nicholas Kirston, Edward Nell, and 
Richard Hamlen, all of the parish of St. Martinrin-the-Fields yomen ; 
and Thomas CoUen, William Coker, Reginald Caysey, John Dicken- 
son, Roger Marker, William Moreton, Thomas Waker, of the parish 
of St. Clement-Danes yomen ; Henry Bocher, John Hollands, Robert 
Whyttell, Roger Bosewell, Richard Goodyar, John Reynoldes, Robert 
Beanforest, John Whyting, John Patynson, William Goldyng, and John 
Pokyns of the city of Westminster yomen ; Richard Cyngle, William 
Anderson, Robert Parker, Robert Jennyns, Edward Hayne, Thomas 
Vyncent, William Hyde, Nicholas Hyde, Ralph Damporte and John 
Punchington of the parish of Stronde co. Midd. have without reason- 
able excuse neglected to provide themselves with bows and arrows, 
and neglected to practice archery, in contempt of the statute in this 
matter provided. 

8 December, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. 
in the night of the said day. about eleven p.m., John Doone late of 
London yoman broke sacrilegiously into the church of the said parish, 
and stole therefrom a horsecloth worth two shillings and a bible worth 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 43 

thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of the wardens of the said 
church. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Doone was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eiiz. 

13 December, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, from the said day, 
Thomas Plott late of Edgware co. Midd. carpenter, albeit under no 
engagement of service to any-one, has refused to work and will not work 
in his vocation of carpenter at the salary and wage of twelve pence 
a-day, against the form of divers statutes and ordinances in this case 
provided. 

28 December, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's- 
Danes without the barrs of the New Temple co. Midd. in the night of 
the said day, viz. about seven p.m., Robert Hammond, late of London 
gentleman, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Robert 
Jenninges, and stole therefrom a red woollen-cloth tunic trimmed with 
black velvet worth forty shillings, a woollen-cloth cloak " coloris rattis 
colour " worth twenty shillings, a linen cloth worth six shilhngs, a linen 
table-cloth worth three shillings, and a velvett nightcapp worth two 
shillings and six-pence. Po se quoad burgularia' non cul nee ret' set 
quoad feloniam ciil ca null petit librum legit vt cl'icus et traditur 
Ordinario. G. D. R., 10 April, 4 Eliz. 

— 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Fynessebery in 
St. Giles's-without-Criplegate, on a day no longer legible on the record, 
Nicholas Yarde late of London gentleman and Ralph .... 
assaulted Henry Byrkened of Lyncolnes Inne gentleman, and robbed 
him of a crymeson sattin purse with a key annexed to it, thirty-eight 
shillings being in the purse, a gold ring set with two precious stones 
called a Turkeis and a Rubey, another gold ring set with a Rubey, a 
woollen cloak, a leather girdle, " a pystolett de ferro et calibe," an orna- 
ment of gold called " a broitche of goulde worth iii li.," a hat, a linen 
kerchief, a sorrell gelding and a saddle. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' 
Nicholas and Ralph were sentenced to be hung. — Also, on the same 
file, a True Bill that, on the night of some day (obliterated from the 
record) of 4 Elizabeth, Nicholas Yerd gentleman and Robert Fitz 
yoman, both late of London, broke burglariously into the house of 
Simon Williams in the parish of St. Dunstan-in-the-West and stole 
therefrom two stone cups with silver-gilt covers, a playne cloth, six 
table-napkins, with other things of the goods and chattels of the said 
Simon Williams. Putting himself ' Guilty,' _ Robert Fitz was also 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eliz. 

— 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that (whereas certain underwoods 
called coppices containing thirty-two 'rodas' in Grynford co. Midd., 
between fourteen and twenty-four years of age, were on 20 Jan. 2 Eliz. 
lopt and cut) William Gerrard late of Harrowe-super-montem co. 



44 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

Midd. gentleman, who had and has the same underwoods in his 
possession from the 20th day of April next following the said lopping 
and cutting thereof, has neglected to hedge in or otherwise defend the 
" germen vocatum the yonge sprynge eorundem subboscorum a 
nocumento et destruccione bestiarum et pecorum/' from the afore- 
said 20 April even until now. 

2 January, 4 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, on the said day at Black- 
wall CO. Midd., Elizabeth Cholmeley late of London spynster stole a 
gold ring worth thirteen shillings and four pence, a piece of gold called 
a pistolate worth five shillings and eight pence, a woman's -peticote 
worth eight shillings, and a waistcoat of flanen worth twenty pence, of 
the goods and chattels of Peter Hoker of London. Putting herself 
' Guilty,' Elizabeth Cholmeley pleaded pregnancy. At the next session, 
held on 20 February 4 Elizabeth, a jury of matrons having declared 
her Not Pregnant, Elizabeth Cholmeley was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eliz. 

19 January, 4 Elizabeth. — Memorandum that Thomas Hewys of 
Middlesex yoman pleaded the Queen's pardon, granted to him under 
the Great Seal on the 8th of the instant January, for killing Lewis 
Howell, which homicide had been declared by a jury at the Gaol 
Delivery held on 1 1 Dec. ult. to have been committed by the said 
Thomas Hewys in self-defence, " et non per feloniam nee ex malicia." 
G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eliz. 

12 February, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. 
on the said day, Roger Fenton of Seynt John's Strete co. Midd. inholder, 
George Bennell of London yoman, William Bagnall of London hosteler, 
Stephen Marvell of Seynt John's Strete aforesaid hosteler, Walter 
Herberd of the same place bocher, and Anthony Gates of the same 
place tapster, and some ten other disturbers of the peace, broke riot- 
ously into certain lands called the Mantells, lying and being in Isling- 
ton, and there violently assaulted and beat John Cosyn and a certain 
William Andrewes, servant of the same John Cosyn. — G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 4 Elizabeth. 

30 April, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Martin- 
in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Rogers late of West- 
minster CO. Midd. gentleman stole a horse, called " an hobbie " of 
" sorrelld " color worth twenty pounds, and a sorreld gelding worth 
thirteen pounds six shillings and eightpence, of the goods and chattels 
of Henry Shelley at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. 
G. D. R., 26 June, 4 Eliz. 

25 May, 4 Elizabeth. — -True Bill that, at Shorediche co. Midd. on 
the said day, Peter Smythe late of London yoman stole a linen shirt 
worth two shillings, and eighteen pieces of linen cloth worth five 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 45 

shillings, of the goods and chattels of Henry Delatowres at Shorediche 
aforesaid. At the foot of the bill, a Latin Memorandum running in 
English thus : — " And the aforesaid Peter puts himself guilty with no 
chattels, and asks for the book. But it is alleged for the Lady the 
Queen that he for a certain other felony perpetrated by him elsewhere 
was convicted, and therefore ought not to have benefit of clergy again. 
And the said Peter says that he is not the same person &c. And he 
asks that this may be enquired of by the country &c. And John Lee 
for the Lady the Queen in this part follows. Therefore let there come 
jurors on the yth of September next coming ; on which day the jury 
demanded came, who being chosen and sworn &c. say upon their oath 
that the aforesaid Peter is the same person who had in former time 
benefit of clergy, and no other person. Therefore it was adjudged that 
Peter Smythe should be hung." G. D. R., 26 June, 4 Eliz. 

29 May, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Wapping co. Midd. on 
the said day, Robert Hemynge, John Starky, Thomas Hemynge, and 
Richard Ualysmythe, all of St. Katerynes co. Midd. yomen, with 
certain persons unknown, broke riotously and by force in a certain 
close of marsh, containing three acres of marsh-land, lying in the marsh 
called Wallemarshe a/zay Wapping Marshe in the said county, pertaining 
to Sir Thomas Wentworth knt.. Lord Wentworth, and having expelled 
the said Thomas Lord Wentworth from the said close still keep him 
out of it. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 4 Eliz. 

31 May, 4 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of William Wynchelowe 
late of London yoman : With Verdict that the said William died on 
the said day within the gaol, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 June, 
4 Eliz. 

10 June, 4 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. on view of the body of Griffin Jones 
late of London yoman : With Verdict that, at the said parish on the 
9th inst about eight p.m., John Hedes alias Ap Rice late of the same 
parish yoman slew and murdered the said Griffin Jones, by throwing a 
dagger at him, so that the weapon gave him a mortal blow in the neck, 
of which he then and there died instantly. Over the name of John 
Hedes, a memorandum that he put himself ' Guilty,' and was sen- 
tenced to behung. G. D. R., 26 June, 4 Eliz. 

28 June, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fulham co. Midd. on 
the said day about six p.m., John White late of Hammersmyth co. 
Midd. yoman assaulted William Tomeson, and murdered the same 
William by giving him with a forrest-bill on his left leg a mortal blow, 
of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 7 Sept., 4 Eliz. 
25 July, 4 Elizabeth. ^True Bill that, at Islyngton co. Midd. on 



46 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the said day, Joan Miller late of the said parish stole a purse worth 
twopence, and ten pounds in numbered money being in the same 
purse, of the goods, chattels and moneys of Henry Millett. Over Joan 
Miller's name, the memorandum " Po se cul ca null Et p'itauit qd est 
p'gnans." She put herself 'Guilty,' had no chattels, and pleaded 
pregnancy. G. D. R., 7 Sept., 4 Eliz. 

12 August, 4 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Kensington co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Home late of London taillour stole a gold neck- 
lace worth four pounds and a gold ring worth five shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Anthony Parkehurst gentleman. Putting himself 
' Guilty,' John Home asked for the book, read like a clerk and was 
delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 7 Sept., 4 Eliz. 

22 August, 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Edge- 
ware CO. Midd. on the said day, Francis Wyythe gentleman and James 
Morten yoman, both late of London, assaulted Thomas Wilkinson of 
London citizen and poulter, and robbed him of a felt hatt worth three 
shillings atid fourpence, a russett-coloured cloak worth twenty shillings, 
a sword worth six shillings, a handkerchief worth fourpence, a pair of 
" boote hoosen " worth sixteen pence, a pair of bootes worth six 
shillings, a pair of spurres worth eight pence, a browne-baye horse 
worth four pounds, a saddle and bridle worth four shillings, a leather 
purse worth twelve pence, and four shillings in numbered money, being 
in the same purse. Over the name of each prisoner, the memorandum 
" cognou' ind'cament' sus." Confessing the indictment, they were both 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Sept., 4 Eliz. 

— 4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that the inhabitants of the parish of 
St. Clement Danes " extra barr' novi templi London co. Midd. infra 
libertat' dne Regine Ducat sui Lancastr' " have had from i December 
3 Elizabeth even till now in the said parish neither stockes nor a cage 
nor buttes, as by the statute touching those matters they ought to 
have. 

30 May, 5 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islyngton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Christofer Jakson late of London yoman stole a black 
gelding worth sixteen pounds, of the goods and chattels of Thomas 
Percy of Islyngton esq. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Christofer Jakson 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

14 June, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Clement's-Danes within the Duchy of Lancaster, on view of the 
body of Robert Bocken late of the said parish, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that on the — th inst. about four p.m. the said Robert Bocken 
went into the Thames near the Savoy Steyres with the intention of 
bathing in the river (ea intencione vt navigaret et seipsum lavaret), 
and that whilst in the water he was seized with the cramp so that he 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 47 

could not get out of the water, and consequently was drowned. 
G. D. R., IS Dec, 6 Eliz. 

25 July, 5 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, at Ickenham co. Midd. on 
the said day, John Smyth gentleman, Edmund Smythe gentleman, 
Hawtrey Smyth gentleman, Robert Barenger yoman, Thomas Vyncent 
laborer, Robert Upton laborer, James Barenger . . . ., Richard 
Heme yoman, Richard Cluck laborer, George Dovey laborer, Richard 
Chambre laborer, Richard Stanbridge carpenter, John Feme laborer, 
John .... husbondman, Amphilisia Leuell spinster, Alice 
Adams widow, Isabel Hale spinster, Agnes Hale . . . ., all late 
of Ryslippe co. Midd., and Goodlack Drawater laborer, John Smyth 
laborer, John Adams laborer, William Waite laborer, Thomas Smythe 
laborer, Isabel Smyth spinster, and Margaret Exton spinster assembled 
in warlike manner, and broke riotously into the close of William Says 
gentleman, and unlawfully carried away four wain-loads of wheat there 
late growing, belonging to the said William Says and worth twelve 
pounds. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

— August, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Olde Braneford co. Midd. on view of the body of Margaret Chaunte, 
there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 12th inst. in the said 
parish, the said Margaret Chaunt, at the instigation of the devil, put 
an end to her life by cutting her throat with a knife worth two-pence, 
so that she died on the same day. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 EHz. 

— August, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Clarkenwell co. Midd. on view of the body of a certain male 
infant : With Verdict that, on the 9th inst. in a bedroom in the dwell- 
ing house of Rose Mannynges widow at Clarkenwell, Joan Damporte 
late of the said parish spynster brought forth the said infant, living at 
the time of birth, and forthwith assaulted and murdered it. G. D. R., 15 
Dec, 6 Eliz. 

18 August, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hampton co. Midd. on view of the body of George Norton, late of 
the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
14th inst. about eight p.m. at Hampton, a certain Thomas Tymperley 
late of the same parish esq. was shooting with bow and arrow at certain 
goals in the Great Parke of Hampton aforesaid, when he shot from his 
bow an arrow, that, striking George Norton on the head, gave him a 
mortal blow, of which he died on the following day. — This detached 
parchment is so mutilated and defaced that it no longer affords some 
particulars requisite for a more full and precise account of the mis- 
adventure. 

24 August, 5 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Paul Bande, late of London yoman, stole two gold rings 



48 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

worth thirty shillings, and a gold ring with a precious stone called " a 
cornelye " set in it worth eight shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Richard Whetnall. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Paul Bande asked for 
the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

25 August, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Sunburye co. Midd. on view of the body of Francis Burdenals late 
of the said parish carter : With Verdict that he died on the 19th inst- 
at Sunburye aforesaid by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 EUz. 

27 August, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the body of John Hutte late of the 
said city yoman : With Verdict that he died in the said city, on the 
25th inst. about eight p.m., by Divine Visitation and not from being 
beaten (et non ex verberacione aliqua obiit). G. D. R., 15 Dec, 
6 Eliz. 

4 September, 5 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fyncheley co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Turner yoman, John 
Church yoman, and .... yoman, all three late of London, 
broke burglariously into the house of Stephen Walbancke, and stole 
therefrom divers pieces of woollen thread called " wollen yearne " 
worth twenty shillings, divers pieces of " lynnyn yearne " worth 
twenty shillings, and a piece of woollen cloth called " a remnant of 
cloth " worth three shillings, and a piece of linen cloth worth three 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Stephen Walbanck. 
Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Thomas Turner and John Church were 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

17 October, 5 Elizabeth. — True Bill of the said date, that at High- 
holburne co. Midd. on the night of the said day, Gilbert Hawkyns 
and Marmaduke Huyson alias Gierke, late of London yomen, broke 
burglariously into the dwelling-house of Christopher Barnerde at High- 
holbume co. Midd., and stole therefrom " sex catinas argenti vocatas 
silver plattes, xii pecias argenti vocatas small silver disshes, xii aceta- 
bulos argenti vocatos silver sawcers, duas calices argenti vocatas 
silver bowles, duas alias calices argenti vocatas silver saltes, duo 
pocula argenti vocata aile pottes, et sex coclearia argenti vocata silver 
spoynes, continent' per estimacionem iiii C et L vncias ad valenciam 
cxl".", of the goods and chattels of Peter Nott gentleman ; and further 
that Roger Tanner late of Westnjinster co. Midd. yoman, knowing the 
said burglary to have been committed by the said Gilbert Hawkyns 
and Marmaduke Huyson alias Clerk, after its commission aided and 
comforted the said two burglars. — A memorandum at the foot of the 
bill certifies that, at the Session held on 3 December 8 Eliz., Gilbert 
Hawkyns was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 10 Oct., 7 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 49 

1 1 November, 5 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chesweke co. Midd. 
on the said day, Edward Diconson gentleman, Thomas Howward 
yoman, both late of Westminster, Thomas Pynchester late of Ches- 
weke yoman, and Joan Sheefe late of London widow, broke into 
the dwelling-house of William Typsell gentleman, and stole therefrom 
two fyne paire of sheetes worth forty shilings, and two woollen cloth 
coats lined with lambs' and conyes' skins worth five pounds. All 
the persons so indicted were at large. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

16 November, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hackney co. Midd. on view of the body of Henry Goslinge, 
late the servant of Sir Roger Cholrneley knt., there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, as he was journeying in his said master's service with 
instructions for George Lynnet, constable of Hackney, the said 
Henry Goslinge came into conflict with one James Jacques alias Gam- 
bold late of ... . yoman and one John de Love alias Wolfe 
late of Stebunhethe yoman, when he (the said Henry Goslinge) and 
James Jacques drew their swords and fought together, in which affray 
the said James, being aided and abetted by John de Love, with his 
sword gave Henry Goslinge on the back and left part of his head a 
mortal wound, of which he died on the isth inst. On his arraignment 
J ohn de Love put himself ' Not Guilty ' and was acquitted. At the 
foot of the bill, a memorandum that, at the Gaol Delivery of 18 Dec, 
7 Eliz., James Jaques produced in court the Queen's Pardon under the 
Great Seal of his felony in slaying Henry Goslinge, dated on some 
day of the last previous month. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

— November, 5 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Margaret Yeoghen late of the said parish, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, on the 13th inst. between six and seven p.m. in the dwel- 
ling-house of Nicholas Yemans of the aforesaid parish, Margaret 
Yeoghen at the instigation of the devil put an end to her own hfe by 
hanging herself with a . . . . (? girdle) worth two-pence, to a 
certain beam of the same house, against the peace crown and dignity of 
the Lady the Queen. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

2 December, 6 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Iseldon co. Midd. 
on the said day, Mathew Rayner, William Myles, William Fowler, 
and Bartholomew Whytt alias Grey, all late of London yomen, stole 
a baye stonyd horse worth three pounds, a dunne gelding worth fifty- 
three shillings and four pence, and a black " curtail geldinge " worth forty 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Franke. Putting them- 
selves ' Guilty,' Matthew Rayner and William Myles were sentenced to 
be hung. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Bartholomew Whytt was 
acquitted. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Fowler was reprieved 

E 



so MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

without judgment. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that on 31 
July, 6 Eliz., William Fowler produced in court the Queen's Pardon 
under the Great Seal, dated 19 June last past. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

5 December, 6 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highegate within 
the parish of St. Pancras co. Midd. (apud Highegate infra parochiam 
Sancti Pancratii) on the said day, John Crofton late of London tailor 
stole a linen shirt worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Roger Cholmeley in the custody of William Robinson, one of the 
Queen's servants, and two linen shirts worth four shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of William Robinson aforesaid. Putting himself 
' Guilty ' and pleading his clergy, John Crofton was delivered to the 
Ordinary. G. D. R., 15 Dec, 6 Eliz. 

26 March, 6 Elizabeth — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the Ambery in the city of Westminster, on view of the body there 
lying dead of Cecilia, late the wife of William Erie of the same city 
yoman : With Verdict that, on the 24th inst. between seven and eight 
p.m., the said William Erie and his wife Cecilia went together to drink 
at the house of a certain William Maddoges in Westminster, and after 
drinking there for an hour and half went to the house of one 
Richard Wyse for more drinking, where they stayed drinking for an 
hour, when they returned to their own house ; That, after returning 
with him to their own house, Cecilia spoke so abusively to her hus- 
band as to make him give her a slap and go off to bed, leaving her in 
the hall of the house, where she remained all night, till on rising from 
his bed William Erie found her in a prostrate condition, and carried her 
to the bed in which he placed her and left her for a time; And that, 
on returning to her three hours later, William Erie found her dead, — ■ 
she having, in the opinion of the jurors, died on the 25 inst. about nine 
p.m. of a certain malady called The Mother (de quodam morbo anglice 
vocato the Mother). 

16 May, 6 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.. on view of the body of Agnes 
Peter widow, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 14th inst. 
between four and five p.m., the same Agnes Peter was in an upper room 
of the dwelling-house of her mistress Catherine Coffin, in order 
that she might prepare supper for her mistress, when she heard some- 
one knocking at the door, and that in going downstairs to the door she 
fell down the same stairs ; from the effects of which fall she died on 
the following day. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 6 Eliz. 

20 June, 6 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day Richard 
Smallman of Finnesbury co. Midd. wyndemyller gave his servant 
Richard Hayward, who then served the said Richard Smallman in the 
art of a windmiller, two shillings a-week for his stipend, amounting in 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. Si 

the whole year to one hundred and four shillings, against the form of 
a certain Statute of 5 Eliz., and against the tenor and effect of the 
same Queen's proclamation, recently made in Middlesex, for and con- 
cerning the wages of artificers, laborers and servants in the said 
county. G. D. R., 26 Sept., 7 Eliz. 

4 August, 6 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Endfylde co. Midd., on view of the body of Alice Emerye late of the 
said parish spinster, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 2nd 
inst. between two and three p.m., the said Alice Emerye in the said 
parish and at the instigation of the devil put an end to her life by 
hanging herself with a halter, worth one halfpenny. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 
6 Eliz. 

12 August, 6 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day in the 
highway at Hamersmyth co. Midd., Elen Pride late of London spinster 
assaulted Elen Abraham, wife of Gilbert Abraham, and robbed her of 
a silver-gilt ring worth two shillings, nine linen handkerchers worth 
twelve shillings, two linen " rayles " worth twenty pence, three linen 
kerchers worth four shillings, a linen coverlet worth three shillings and 
four pence, and two shillings and fourpence in numbered money, of 
the goods chattels and moneys of the same Gilbert Abraham. Putting 
herself ' Guilty,' Elen Pride pleaded her pregnancy. On being found 
' Not Pregnant,' by a jury of matrons, she was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D., . . . ., Eliz. 

15 August, 6 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the , body of Anne Chambers alias 
Gunstone late of the Great Sanctuarye in the said city spinster : With 
Verdict that, on the 13th inst. about i p.m., Elizabeth Neale being in her 
usual habitation within the Great Sanctuary struck, trod on and bit the 
said Anne, and again on the same day between eight and nine p.m. of 
the same day struck the said Anne, and with her right foot gave the 
said Anne a blow in the body, of which she died on the following day ; 
and that by the said blow Elizabeth Neale murdered the said Anne. 
G. D. R., 6 Oct., 6 Eliz. 

21 August, 6 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hendon co. Midd. on view of the body of Hugh Lewys, 
there lying dead: With Verdict that, at Hendon on the 15th inst. 
Ralph Houghton, late of Hendon yoman, assaulted the same Hugh 
Lewys and then and there murdered him by giving him with a dagger 
a mortal wound in the left side, of which wound he died on the present 
2ist of August. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum — "Et 
p'dcus Rad'us Houghton po se sed Jur' die' qd. non est Culpabil' de 
murdro sed die' qd. est Culpabil' de homicidio et felonica interfeccio'e 
p'd'ci Hugonis Lewys, Et p'd' Hugo {sic) pet' libra' non legit vt clericus 

E 2 



52 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

I'o sus." And the aforesaid Ralph Houghton puts himself, but the 
jurors say that he is not Guilty of murder, but say that he is Guilty of 
homicide and the felonious slaying of the aforesaid Hugh Lewys ; 
And the aforesaid Hugh [it should be Ralph] asks for the book, does 
not read like a clerk : — -Therefore, Let him be hung. G. D. R., 6 Oct. 
6 Eliz. 

8 September, 6 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Golding lane in St. Giles's-without-Creplegate co. Midd., on 
view of the body of Margaret Carter late of the same place, there lying 
dead : With Verdict that, on the 6th inst. between three and four p.m. 
at Golding Lane aforesaid, the same Margaret uttered insulting words 
to Prudence Langhan, wife of John Langhan of Golding Lane laborer, 
on account of which insulting speech Alice Huggens, late of the same 
lane, spinster and servant of the same John and Prudence I^anghan, 
lead the same Margaret out of the said John Langhan's house by 
the arm ; and That half-an-hour later, on coming to a certain paling 
near her own house and at the back part of John Langhan's house, 
the said Margaret saw Alice drawing water from a well close at hand, 
and taking up a stone threw it at the same Alice, so that it hit her 
on the hand, whereupon the same Alice taking up a vessel full 
of water thr^w it at Margaret; and That in drawing back quickly, 
so as to avoid the vessel and water thus thrown at her, Margaret 
Carter fell backwards into the well, and so by mischance was 
drowned in the same well. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 6 Eliz. 

30 November, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highholburne co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Culby alias Thomas Fulverstone late 
of London yoman stole a grey gelding, worth six pounds fourteen 
shillings and fourpence, of the goods and chattels of Bartholomew 
Skerne gentleman. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 Eliz. 

19 January, 7 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, David Ellis late of London yoman stole and carried off 
" vnum lavarium vocatum a barbors basen de quodam metallo vocato 
latton ad valenciam \\s. \id., vnum poculum vocatum a latten pott ad 
valenciam \\s. y\d., tres tonsorias vocatas rasors ad valenciam \i\s., 
un' forfex voc' a pare of shares ad valenciam us. vid., dua pectina 
vocata combes ad valenciam viii//., et vnum instrumentum music, 
vocatum a pare of Clavicordes ad valenciam iiijj-., et vnum instru- 
mentum musicu' vocatum a Griterne ad valenciam iij.?. " of the good 
and chattels of William Swayne at Westminster aforesaid. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' David Ellis was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 
Feb., 7 Eliz. 

23 January, 7 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes- 
without-the-bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on the said day, John 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 53 

Dull late of London yoman stole " unum annulum da auro vocat' a 
hoope of golde " worth twenty-four shillings, and seven shillings and 
ninepence in numbered money, of the goods and chattels and moneys 
of John Arnold. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Dull pleaded his 
clergy. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 Eliz. 

12 February, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Kentisstowne co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Cosen and Thomas Dight,.both late of 
Islington yomen, broke into the close of Thomas Kerbie and stole 
therefrom two black steeres, worth fifty shillings each, of the goods and 
chattels of Thomas Earl of Sussex. Both cattle-stealers put themselves 
' Guilty ' : John Cosen pleading his clergy was delivered to the 
Ordinary ; judgment on Thomas Dight was deferred till the next Gaol 
Dehvery. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 Eliz. 

16 February, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Henry Livers, William Smyth and Thomas Marten, all late of 
London yomen, stole and carried off a silke hat worth thirteen shillings 
and eight pence, and a covering of linen cloth worth five shillings. All 
three admitted their guilt ; whereupon Henry Livers was sentenced to 
be hung, but William Smyth and Thomas Marten, pleading their 
clergy and reading like clerks, were delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 
16 Feb., 7 Eliz. 

24 February, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordyche co. 
Midd. on the said day about eight a.m., Humfrey Perwige alias Peroge, 
of Hogsdon CO. Midd. yoman, entered the church of Shordyche 
aforesaid in time of divine service, • and irreverently disturbed and 
molested. Nicholas Dangell alias Evans, the minister there constituted 
and, in the presence of all the parishioners there hearing the same 
divine service, called the same Nicholas " Vyle knave. Turd in the 
tethe knave," against the form of the statute in that case provided. 
G. S. P., . . . ., 7 Eliz. 

„ „ , 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, a certain highway at Highe- 
gate Hill in the parish of Islington co. Midd., near the Spittelhouse 
there, is in decay and want of repair, and that the people of Islyngton 
ought and have been accustomed to repair the same way. G. S. P., 
. . . ., 7 Eliz. 

18 May, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hownslowe co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Gregory late of Cheam co. Surrey laborer and 
Richard Hyde late of Ewell co. Surrey laborer stole fifteen wether 
sheep worth four pounds ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Walter Marchall, thirteen wether sheep worth fifty-three schillings, of 
the goods and chattels of William Blake, eight wether sheep worth 
thirty-six shiUings and fourpence, of the goods and chattels of Thomas 
Killik, and six wether sheep worth twenty-four shillings, of the goods 



54 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

and chattels of Robert Shott. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' both 
sheepstealers were sentenced to be hung. But afterwards (it appears 
from a clerical note at the foot of the bill), at the Gaol Delivery of 
20 Jan., 9 Eliz., it was adjudged that "Richard Hide iret inde sine 
die virtute actus libere perdonacionis de anno octavo Domine Regine 
nunc." G. D. R., 6 June, 7 Eliz. 

31 May, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington in the night of 
the said day, Richard Haies late of London yoman broke burglariously 
into the dwelling-house of Robert Pearce, and stole therefrom " sex 
paropsides vocat' platters de electro " worth eight shillings, five pewter 
dysshes (patinas de electro), a pewter bason worth two shillings, two 
vessels " de metallo vocat' Latton " worth two shillings and sixpence, 
. . . . pewter sawcers worth two shillings, two pewter pots worth 
three shillings and four pence, and two other pewter pots worth three 
shillings, a pewter cup worth twelve pence, another pewter cup worth 
sixpence, and a stone pott worth eightpence, of the goods and chattels 
of the same Robert Pearce ; and That, knowing him to have perpe- 
trated the said felony, Nicholas Procter late of London yoman received 
aided and comforted the said Richard Haies on the same day, after 
the commission of the said felony. Confessing the indictment, Richard 
Haies was sentenced to be hung. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Nicholas 
Procter asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the 
Ordinary. G. D. R., 6 June, 7 Eliz. 

10 June, 7 Elizabeth. — Bill that William Heyber, late of South 
Mymmes co. Midd. gentleman, at the parish of South Mymmes afore- 
said took a blak garled cowe bullock worth sixteen shillings, and 
another blak garled cowe bullock worth sixteen shillings, and a dunne 
cowe bullock worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of George 
Joreston of Waltham Crosse in the parish of Cheston co. Hert. yoman, 
and kept the same three cowes from the said loth of June until the 
following Easter, with the intention of defrauding the said George 
Joreston of them. Endorsed " Billa Vera for trespass." G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 8 Eliz. 

26 June, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sandon co. Essex on the 
said day, Thomas Blades late of London yoman stole two oxen of 
divers colours worth forty shillings each, and a cow " coloris brandid " 
worth twenty-six shillings and eightpence, of the goods and chattels of 
Thomas Halliwell husbandman. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas 
Blades asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the 
Ordinary. G. D. R., 13 July, 7 Eliz. 

I July, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seynt John's Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day Robert Bockett of Fynnesbury bocher incited 
and caused John Jenkes, then in the service of Thomas Butterworth, 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 55 

to withdraw from the said service before the end of the term agreed 
upon between the said Thomas and John. G. D. R., 26 Sept., 7 EHz. 

18 July, 7 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the said day at West- 
minster, John Bretheryck late of London yoman stole a black woollen- 
cloth tunic worth thirty shillings, " tres olas electri vocatas bowe pottes 
ad valenciam xviii^.," three cusshions worth twenty shiUings, an old 
Turky carpett worth five shillings, a black chamlet kyrtill trimmed 
with black velvet worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Anthony Silver. Po se cul ca null Sus. G. D. R., 10 Oct., 7 Eliz. 

31 July, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordiche co. Midd. on 
the said day, Edmund Owett gardener, Redmond Owett gardener and 
Christiana Owett spynster, all three late of Sowthewarke co. Surrey, 
assaulted a certain William Welshe, and that Edmund Owett aforesaid 
then and there with a staif gave the same WUHam on his head a mortal 
blow, of which he died on the 7th of August next following, and that 
Redmond (Dwett and Christiana Owett aided and abetted the said 
Edmund Owett, in thus murdering William Welshe. Putting himself 
'Not Guilty ' of murder, but 'Guilty' of homicide, Edmund was 
sentenced to be hung. Redmond and Christiana put themselves 'Not 
Guilty ' and did not retract G. D., . . . ., Eliz. 

S August, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in his dwelling-house at 
W^estminster co. Midd. on the said day, John Beamond assaulted Anne 
Sellett, an infant six years old, " et ipsam Annam .... contra 
voluntatem ejusdem Anne felonice rapuit et carnaliter cognovit." 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Beamoiide asked for the book, read 
like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 26 Sept., 
7 Eliz. 

7 August, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Mary- 
at-Strande co. Midd. on the said day, Edith Sawnders late of London 
spynster stole a parcel-gilt goblett of sylver worth four marks, and six 
silver spoons worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of William 
Goldwell gentleman. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Edith Sawnders pleaded 
pregnancy. At a subsequent Session, held on 3 December 8 Elizabeth, 
a jury of matrons finding her pregnant, she was reprieved without 
sentence till she should be delivered of her child. At the Gaol 
Delivery held on 20 January 9 Elizabeth, before Christopher Draper, 
Mayor of the city of London, and other Justices, it was agreed that 
the aforesaid Edith Sawnders " iret inde sine die virtute actus Hbere per. 
donacionis di anno octavo domine Regine." G. D. R., 10 Oct., 7 Eliz. 

9 August, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martyn's-in-the- 
Fields near Charing Crosse co. Midd. on the said day, William Bache 
late of London yoman stole a parcel-gilt silver goblet worth forty 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Ode of Milkstrete, London- 



56 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Bache asked for the book, read like 
a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., lo Oct. 7 Eliz. 

20 August, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Heyes co. Midd. in 
the night of the said day, Nicholas Fox late of London yoman and 
Anne Robyns late of London spynster broke burglariously into the 
dwellinghouse of James Nellam, and stole therefrom two linen sheets 
worth fifteen shillings, two linen table-cloths worth five shillings, three 
table napkyns worth eighteen pence, three linen smockes worth three 
shillings, a linen shirt worth eighteen pence, " et quatuor ventralia 
vocat' aprons panni linei ad valenciam iiiij.," of the goods and chattels 
of the said James Nellam. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Nicholas Fox 
was sentenced to be hung. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Anne Robyns 
pleaded pregnancy ; and afterward, viz. at the Gaol Delivery of 3 Dec. 
8 Eliz., she was found ' Not Pregnant ' by a jury of matrons, and 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 10 Oct., 7 Eliz. 

24 September, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
at other times within the last two years Richard Wakefelde of West- 
minster has exercised the art of a carpenter, without having ever been 
an apprentice in the same. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 8 Eliz. 

16 October, 7 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at St. 
James's Feldes in the parish of St. Margaret's Westminster on the said 
day, Robert Egles, Edward Barrondine alias Barrington, and John 
Clerk, all late of London yomen, together assaulted Robert Bryan of 
London yoman, and then and there robbed him of a skye-culowered 
woollen-cloth cloak worth thirty-three shillings and fourpence, a sword 
worth six shillings and eight-pence, and a buckler worth six shillings and 
eight-pence, of the goods and chattels of John Litcott esq., in the 
custody of the same Robert Bryan. All three prisoners put themselves 
' Guilty.' G. D. R., 26 April, 8 Eliz. 

17 December, 8 Elizabeth. — -Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Thomas Madder 
late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said 
Thomas died within the gaol on the isth inst., by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 19 Dec, 8 Eliz. 

22 February, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St Katherine's co. 
Midd. on the said day, Roger Heme late of London yoman broke 
into the house of Ehzabeth Wylloughby widow, " apud villam St. 
Katerine," and stole therefrom a goblett of sylver parcell-gilte worth 
five pounds, a parcell-gilt silver salsarium worth forty shillings, ten 
parcell-gilt silver spoons worth three pounds six shillings and eight- 
pence, and a silver gilt " castinge bottell " worth forty-three shillings. 
Pleading ' Guilty,' Roger Heme asked for the book, read like a clerk, 
and was handed over to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 26 April, 8 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 57 

31 March, 8 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Martyn-in-the-Feld George Wylson late of Westminster yoman stole a 
pair of carnacion-coloured stockens and a pair of red stockens, worth 
four shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Dowlinge hosteller. 
George Wylson pleaded guilty, asked for the book, read like a clerk 
and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 26 April, 8 Eliz. 

13 April, 8 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, in the highway at Clerken- 
well on the said day Richard Price, late of London yoman, assaulted 
Robert Griffith, and robbed him of a man's gowne of blewe chamlett 
faced with Fox worth five pounds and " vnum pallium de panno laneo 
vocatum a cloke of frezeado," of the goods and chattels of John 
Appleyarde esquire. Richard Price put himself ' Not Guilty ' and did 
not retract, and was acquitted (Id' Q= = Ideo Quietus). G. D. R., 26 
April, 8 Eliz. 

14 April, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Goldinge lane co. Midd. 
on the said day, Daniel Podivate late of London yoman stole five 
shillings of numbered money, a hatt worth three shillings and fourpence, 
a pair of white woollen-cloth breeches worth six shillings and eight- 
pence, a pair of silver hooks worth two shillings and sixpence, a hand- 
kerchef worth twelve pence, and a pair of leather gloves worth four- 
pence, of the goods chattels and moneys of Robert Bunby. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Daniel Podivate was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
26 April, 8 Eliz. 

17 April, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington on the said 
day, Thomas Sore late of London cordewayner stole a carpette of 
nedle worke worth twenty marks, of the goods and chattels of Paul 
Dayrell esq. Thomas Sore put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 26 
April, 8 Eliz. 

16 September, 8 Elzabeth. — True Bill that George Wilton, on the 
said day and at divers times before and afterwards, kept at Seynt 
John's Streyt co. Midd. a melting house, in which he made candles 
of tallowgh, called talloughcandells, where no such occupation was 
heretofore kept, to the great injury of his neighbours, against the form of 
divers statutes in that case provided. G. S, P. R., Michaelmas, 8 Eliz. 

19 September, 8 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of Stebunheth co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Mathew Parrey late of the said parish laborer, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, on the 4th day of last August between two and three p.m., 
the said Mathew Parrey was lying asleep and hidden from view in a 
little ditch near the Limehouse buttes, in the Lyttell Fielde of Stebun- 
heth, when William Becket of the said parish limeburner, then shoot- 
ing in the company of other archers shooting with long bows, shot in 



58 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the direction of the goal an arrow, that after falling slipt along the 
ground into the ditch, and by mischance gave the said Mathew a wound 
on the fore part of his head, of which wound he languished till the 
19th day of the said August, when he died thereof.— The length of the 
time between the death and inquest is noteworthy. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 
8 Eliz. 

26 September, 8 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Marie Matefelon alias Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on view of the body of William Barnes late of the said parish 
shoemaker, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the nth day of last 
August between six and seven p.m., the said William Barnes, at Spyttel 
Felde alias Fleming Nose (? Close) in the parish of Stebunheth, came to 
the common marks called twelve-score-pricks in the said field, to see 
and watch certain archers and archery practice, then being at the said 
marks ; when Francis Ellman of Roydon co. Herteforde brickmaker 
shot an arrow that, being carried out of its course by the force of a 
strong wind, struck the said William Barnes on the head, albeit all the 
archers and other watchers of the shooting called out to him to beware 
of the danger and avoid the arrow ; And That from the wound so given 
him on the said nth of August last the said Wilham languished and 
died by mischance on the 15th day of the same month. — The length 
of the time between death and the inquest is remarkable. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 8 Eliz. 

3 October, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 
the said day, Robert Parker late of London bocher stole two cows 
worth forty shillings each, of the goods and chattels of George Addison. 
" Po se cul ca null repri sine judicio pro cert' caus' Cur' moven'." He 
put himself ' Guilty,' had no chattels, and was reprieved without judg- 
ment, for certain reasons moving the Court. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 8 Eliz. 

13 October, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Hauworth late of London laborer 
entered the dwelling-house of John Becon, and stole therefrom eleven 
shillings of numbered money, of the goods and chattels of the same 
John Becon. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Hauworth was re- 
prieved without judgment on account of boyish age (rep', sine judicio 
propter pueril ' etatem) ; and afterwards, at the Gaol Delivery of 
3 Oct. 9, Eliz., he produced the Queen's Pardon under the Great Seal, 
dated 18 .... 9 Eliz., and prayed humbly that it might be allowed 
to him. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 9 EHz. 

6 November, 8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Kyrbye late of London tailour stole a 
browne-bay mare worth thirty-three shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Agnes Lampard widow and Richard Welles. Putting himself 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 59 

' Guilty,' John Kyrbye was sentenced to be hung ; but afterwards, viz. 
at the Gaol Delivery of 3 Oct., 9 Eliz., John Kyrbye produced the 
Queen's Pardon of his felony under the Great Seal, dated 18 June of 
the same year. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 9 Eliz. 

20 November, 9 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Maryboorne co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard Weekes 
late of ... . yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
the 1 6th inst, between night and nine p.m., the said Richard Weekes 
was in God's and the Queen's Peace at a certain place in Paddington 
CO. Midd., called " le stoupe," when Christopher Mylles late of Pad- 
dington aforesaid tailor assaulted him and murdered him, by giving 
him on the right part of his neck with a piked staffe a mortal wound, 
of which he died on the present 20th inst. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 9 Eliz. 

21 November, 9 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Richard Starkey 
gentleman : With Verdict that Richard Starkey died within the gaol 
on the 20th inst., by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 9 Eliz. 

30 November, 9 Elizabeth. — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Hackney co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard MeUers late of the 
said parish sawyer, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 15 October, 
8 Elizabeth between the hours of seven and eight p.m. the said Richard 
MeUers was in ^God's and the Queen's peace in the house of Humfrey 
Elsemoore at Whitechappell, when Henry Jepes alias Gibbes, late of 
Whitechappell weaver, came and feloniously assaulted and murdered 
him with a boocher's knife, giving him with that weapon a wound be- 
tween the ribs on his left side, of which wound the said Richard 
Mellers languished till he died thereof on the 23rd day of the same 
October. Further, the Jury say that immediately after committing the 
said murder the said Henry Jepes alias Gybbes fled by night : The 
jury further saying they do not know what goods, chattels, lands or 
tenements the said murderer had on the day, on which the said Richard 
Mellers died. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 9 Eliz. 

3 April, 9 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martyns-in-Lez-Feildes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, William Donne late of Westminster laborer 
stole a black velvett capp worth five shillings, two yardes of russet sarce- 
nett worth ten shillings, and ten pounds in numbered money, of the 
goods chattels and moneys of William Burne. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
William Donne was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 28 May, 9 Eliz. 

6 May, 9 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. John's Strete co. Midd. 
on the said day, Robert Roockewood late of London yoman stole a 
cote of grograyne worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
William Pegesworth. Pleading his clergy, Robert Roockewood was 
delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 28 May, 9 Eliz. 



60 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

8 May, 9 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes-with- 
out-the-bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on the said day, John 
Johnson late of London yoman stole " unum jocale auri vocat' a 
Tablett ad valenciam xli.," of the goods and chattels of Humfrey 
Damport. Pleading his clergy, John Johnson was delivered to the 
Ordinary. G. D. R., 28 May, 9 Eliz. 

16 May, 9 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in a certain stable being 
parcel of a messuage called The Swanne in Saint John's Strete co. 
Midd.,. William Porter of the said street bocher, on the day aforesaid 
and at divers times before and afterwards, killed swine, oxen and calves, 
making there a slaughterhouse, where no slaughterhouse formerly 
existed, to the nuisance and inconvenience of his neighbours. G. D. E.., 
28 May, 9 Eliz. 

20 May, 9 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hownslowe co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Bond late of the same place yoman, stole two 
garmentsworth three shillings and four pence each, of the goods and 
chattels of Edmund Wyndham gentleman, and a gray gelding worth 
forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir John Windham knt. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' he was sentenced to be hung. Afterwards, at 
the Gaol Delivery of Newgate held on 16 February, 11 Elizabeth, he 
produced the Queen's Pardon of the said felony, granted to him by 
Letters Patent under the Great Seal, dated i December of the same 
eleventh year of her reign. G. D. R., 28 May, 9 Eliz. 

22 May, 9 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post mortem, taken at 
Endfeilde co. Midd. on view of the body of William Woodland late of 
Mores Hatche laborer, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
WilKam died at Mores Hatche on the 19th inst., by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 28 May, 9 EHz. 

26 May, 9 Elizabeth. — True bill that, at Westminster on the said 
day, Hugh Lewes late of London yoman stole three great purses called 
bagges worth six shillings and eightpence, nine leather purses worth six 
shillings and eight pence, five leather girdles worth five shillings, nine pair 
of shoes worth five shillings, " quatuor specula de vitro vocat' Lokinge 
Glasses " worth three shillings, a pair of stockings worth twenty pence, 
eighteen pairs of knives worth ten shillings, forty-seven pairs of gloves 
worth twenty shillings, three thousand pynnes worth two shillings, two 
pairs of painted cards worth six pence, of the goods and chattels of 
William Tytly. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Hugh Lewes was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R., 28 May, 9 Eliz. 

15 December, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at eleven p.m. in the 
night of the said day at St. Clement's-Danes co. Midd., William 
Harrison and John Humfrey, both late of London yomen, broke 
into the house of Edmund Wynchester at St. Clement's Danes, and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 6l 

Stole therefrom " quatuor thoraces vocat' Spanishe lether jerkins ad 
valemciam xxvis." of the goods and chattels of the said Edmund, 
and eight other Spanishe lether jerkins worth three pounds, and " duos 
diploides de cores ad valenciam iis.," of the goods and chattels of some 
unknown man, then in the keeping of the said Edmund. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' William Harrison was sentenced to be hung ; John 
Humfreywas at large. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 10 Eliz. 

6 January., 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seynt Johnes Strete 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Robert Hodgeson, late of London taylor, 
stole a black woollen-cloth cloke worth twenty shillings, of the goods 
and chattels of Humfrey Asshfeld gentleman. Putting himself 
' Guilty,' Robert Hodgeson asked for the book, read like a clerk and 
was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 10 Eliz. 

14 January, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hendon co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Lane late of London yoman stole five sheep 
worth twenty shillings of the goods and chattels of William Brent, 
another sheep worth five shillings of the goods and chattels of 
Richard Brent, and another sheep worth five shillings of the goods 
and chattels of Joan Brent. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Lane 
was sentenced to be hung ; but at a subsequent Gaol Delivery, he 
produced the Queen's Pardon of his felony, under the Great Seal, 
dated at Gorhambury, 29 March 10 Eliz. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 10 
Eliz. 

16 January, 10 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Stebunheth co. Midd. on view of the body of Bryan Ewyn 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, in an 
affray (of which particulars are given in this calendar, under date 
6 March 10 Eliz.) Nicholas Banckes late of Stebunheth maryner slew 
the same Bryan Ewen by giving him in the left side of his breast on 
the 14th inst. a mortar wound, of which he died instantly at the Ferry 
at Blackwall in Stebunheth. G. D. R., 3 May, 10 Ehz. 

12 February, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clementes 
Danes-extra-Barras Novi Templi on the said day, Robert Steward, late 
of London yoman, stole three black woollen-cloth cloaks worth fifteen 
pounds, " sex globulos de auro vocatos buttons ad valenciam iiii li." 
a sword worth twenty shillings, and a buckler worth ten shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Thomas Diring esq. G. D., . . . . 10 

Eliz. 

24 February, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day 
James Bearde late of London gentleman, Henry Lynforde alias 
Lytforde late of Haringaie co. Midd.- yoman, Thomas Hardinge late 
of Highgate co. Midd., taillour, Andrew Browne late of London 
yoman, Henry Hansell late of Strowde Grene co. Midd. laborer, with 



62 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

ten unknown malefactors forcibly expelled William Proctour of London 
goldsmith from a messuage or tenement and forty-eight acres of field 
and pasture, lying at Strowde Grene in the parish of Hernsey co. Midd., 
and having so dispossessed him of the said messuage and land still 
keep him out of the same. G. D. R., 3 May, 10 Eliz. 

6 March, 10 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Stebunheth co. Midd. on view of the body of John ap Jennour late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, between three . 
and four p.m. of the 14th of January last past, Nicholas Bankes late of 
Stebunheth aforesaid was at Lymehouse in that parish, in God's and the 
Queen's peace, when John ap Jennour aforesaid, and Bryan Ewyn and 
Peter Dyckson, both late of London yomen, came and abused the 
same Nicholas Bankes with insulting words, and ' vi et armis ' assaulted 
him, whereupon William Pemerton, Edward Taylor and Richard 
Rawson (all three late of Stebunheth mariners, and familiar friends 
of Nicholas Bankes) uttered insulting words, after which parleying, 
both parties of disputants went on the same day from Lymehouse 
to the Ferrye at Blackwall in the said parish ; And That, as soone 
as two parties had come to the same Ferrye, WiUiam Pemerton, 
Nicholas Banckes, Edward Taylor and Richard Rawson assaulted 
the aforesaid John ap Jennour, Brian Ewyn and Peter Dyckson, and 
that in the ensuing affray fought by the two parties, William Pemer- 
ton with a sword gave John ap Jennour on the fore part of his head 
a mortal wound, of which he died on the Sth of March next follow- 
ing. — On his arraignment for the manslaughter of John ap Jennour, 
William Pemerton pleaded his clergy and was delivered to the 
Ordinary. At subsequent Gaol Deliveries, Edward Taylor and Richard 
Rawson pleaded Pardons, granted to them under the Great Seal. 
No memorandum touching Nicholas Banckes, who appears from a 
previous Inquest (of 16 Jan., 10 Elizabeth) to have slain Bryan Ewyn 
in this brawl. G. D. R., 3 May, 10 Eliz. 

21 March, to Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stokenewington co. 
Midd. on the said day (being Lord's day), Robert Harrington clerk, 
John Sparke laborer, Roger Walsheman carpenter and Thomas Shep- 
parde laborer, all of Haringsgaye alias Harnesey co. Midd., broke into 
the close of William Patten of Stokenewington esq., and trod down the 
grass growing there. G. S. P. R., Easter, 10 Eliz. 

27 April, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmylstrete co. Midd. 
on the said day, and at divers times before and afterwards, William 
Rock of St. Nicholas Shambles, London, kept hogs in a certain yard, 
and put the entrails of animals there, so that tfie said street and other 
neighbouring places were full of fetid and putrid stench. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 10 Eliz. 



MIUDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 63 

5 August, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Gowlding Lane co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Truslove, late of the said lane clerk, 
stole " vnam thoralem vocatam a coverlet ad valenciam iiiis.," a woman's 
kirthell of black worsted worth fifteen shillings, and an ell of canvas 
worth twelve pence. Pleading ' Guilty,' Thomas Truslove asked for 
the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 10 Eliz. 

7 August, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Alice Lawrence spinster broke open a certain close cup- 
borde in the house of Robert Kendall gentleman, and stole therefrom 
duo argentea pocula vocate Siluer ale pottes," worth three pounds six 
shillings and eightpence each. Putting herself 'Not Guilty,' Alice 
Lawrence did not retract : the memorandum at the foot of the bill 
running thus, " Et p'dicta Alicia po se non cul' nee recess'." G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 10 Eliz. 

19 August, id Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Tuttell Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Walter Fadie and Roger Nowell, both of Lon- 
don yomen, stole " sex pecias electri vocatas quarte pottes ad valen- 
ciam xiis., vnam aliam peciam electri vocatam a pinte pott of pewter 
ad valenciam xd., vnam aliam peciam electri vocatam a potell pott ad 
valenciam iiis. iind., et vnam candelabrum vocatum a latten candelsticke 
ad valenciam iiii. de bonis et catallis cujusdam Adami Lambe." Both 
thieves put themselves ' Guilty,' asked for the book, and after reading like 
clerks, were delivered to the Ordinary. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 10 Eliz. 

30 August, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day John 
Band late of Seynt Johns Strete co. Midd. tayler, being under thirty 
years of age and unmarried and not in the service of any-one, and 
having neither forty shillings of rent per annum, nor goods or chattels 
to the value of ten pounds, on being lawfully required by Robert 
Daney taylor to serve him in the art and faculty of a taylor, for the 
wages appointed by the Justices of the Peace of the said county, 
altogether refused to do so, against the form of the statute in this case 
provided ; and Further, that Walter Heathe and William Grymes of 
Seynt John's Strete aforesaid taylors on the said day and at divers times 
before and afterwards encouraged, entertained, abetted and comforted 
the said John Band, so that the aforesaid Robert Daney has been the 
less able to have and enjoy the services of the same John Band. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 10 Eliz. 

13 November, 10 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at West Brainford 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Trull and John Fynche, both of Iver 
CO. Buck, bochers, stole a red steere worth thirty-three shillings and 
four pence, and a red cow of the same value, of the goods and chattels 
of William Pierson.— G. D. R., 3 May, 11 Eliz. 



64 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

3 1 January, i i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. 
on the said day, Anthony Burne gentleman, Henry Willoughby gentle- 
man and Abraham Mathewes yoman, all late of London, together with 
divers other unknown disturbers of the peace, assembled riotously and 
then and there beat, wounded and maltreated Robert Awdiens, the 
Queen's bailiff of the said town. G. S. P. R., Easter, ii Eliz. 

8 March, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Lambe Corner in the 
parish of St. Clement-Danes without the bars of the New Temple on 
the said day, Richard Harrys late of Clement's Inne gentleman as- 
saulted Adam Eyre, he being in God's and the Queen's peace, and with 
a dagger wounded him on the head, so as to draw blood and put him in 
danger of his life. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that, on the 
4th of July next following at the Castell in Seynt John's Street, Richard 
Harrys was fined . . . s. by John Harrington, William Wighteman 
and Barnard Randolph esq. J.P. G. S. P. R., Easter, ii Eliz. 

26 March, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harringay alias 
Harnesey co. Midd. on the said day, Martin Warner of Islington 
gentleman, Edward Bussell of Kentyshetowne laborer, and Christopher 
Dunston of Islington yoman, with four unknown persons, entered law- 
lessly and by force into a certain close of two acres, now or lately in 
the occupation of John Draiper, being the freehold of Robert Harring- 
ton clerk prebendary of the prebend of Browneswood in Harringay 
aforesaid, and disseised the said Robert Harrington of, and expelled 
the said John Draiper from the said close, and from that day even till 
now have kept and do keep them out of it. G. D. R., 6 June, 
II Eliz. 

2 April, i i Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. on 
the said day, William Paten of Stoke Newyngton co. Midd. gentleman, 
and John Feme of the same place yoman, together with many unknown 
persons, assembled riotously and with arms and violence made unlawful 
entry on a certain close called " Lyttle Kyngsfyeld," being the freehold 
of Robert Harryngton elk., prebendary of the prebend of Brownes- 
wood of St. Paul's Church in London, and parcel of the said prebend, 
and having expelled the same Robert from it, and disseized him of it, 
still keep him out of it. G. S. P. R., Easter, 11 Eliz. 

13 April, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fynnesbury on the said 
day, Laurence Nashe, bailiff of the manor of Fynnesbury assaulted 
Robert Wyngefelde, and without any sufficient warrant and reasonable 
cause imprisoned the said Robert in a certain prison at Finnesbury, 
and kept him there for an hour-and-half G. S. P. R., Easter, 1 1 Eliz. 

19 April, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackeney co. Midd. on 
the said day, John Swego of St. Helen's parish in London merchaunt 
. . . ., with three unknown persons, made forcibly entry on a certain 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 65 

messuage, called " the King's Place," being the freehold of the Lady 
Martha Carewe widow, and having expelled her from the messuage and 
disseized her of it, still keep her out of it. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
II Eliz. 

29 April, ii Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquest-post-mortem, taken at 
St. Martin's-in-the-Fields within the city of Westminster, on view of the 
body of George Varneham late of Richmond co. Surrey : With Verdict 
that, on the 27* instant between the hours of twelve and one p.m., 
Anthony Marten, one of the gentlemen-sewers of the Queen's Cham- 
ber, was at Whitehall in attendance on the Queen and serving at the 
said Queen's dinner in his office of 'Sewar,' when the aforesaid George, 
then being in the mansion house of a certain . . . ., and knowing 
the aforesaid Anthony was in attendance and serving within the Queen's 
palace,, with malice aforethought .... and having a sword and 
buckler went to the said palace ■ . . . ., and there within the great 
gate of the Queen's aforesaid hospice went to the place called the 
Porter's Lodge .... and waited for more than an hour the 
coming out of the said Anthony with the intention of attacking him. 
From the decipherable portions of the remnant of a decayed record it 
appears that after lying wait for and following him, George Varneham 
forced an affray on Anthony Martin, at a place somewhere near the 
bridge towards Scotland Gate, and within the verge of the court, and 
was on the point of striking at him with the intention of killing him, 
when in self-defence and for the preservation of his life Anthony 
Martin crossed swords with his assailant, and in the ensuing encounter 
gare George Varneham a wound in the left part of his breast of which 
he died on the following day; the verdict of the jurors being that 
Anthony committed homicide in self-defence, and without malice 
aforethought or any felonious motive. G. D. R., 6 June, ri Eliz. 

20 May, 1 1 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shoreditch on the said 
day Richard Pryor, late of London yoman, stole a piece of linen cloth 
called " husewives clothe,'' containing twenty-five ells and worth forty 
shillings. Pleading guilty, Richard Pryor was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 6 June, 1 1 Eliz. 

26 May, II Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John South- 
cot (one of the Queen's Justices ad Placita coram ipsa Regina tenenda) 
and Thomas Bromley esq. Solicitor-General, of Anthony Marten one 
of the gentlemen sewers of the Queen's Chamber, in the sum of a 
hundred marks ; and of Ralph Calveley (one of the gentlemen atten- 
dants on the said Queen), Bartholomew Yorke of Richemont co. 
Surrey gentleman, Peter Pawlyn a grome of the said Queen's chamber, 
and Anthony Bybye another grome of the same chamber, in the sum 
of one hundred and sixty pounds : For the said Anthony Marten's 

F 



66 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

appearance at the next Gaol Delivery to be held at Newgate, to answer 
then and there all such things as may be objected against him on the 
Queen's part. — Also, taken on the same day before the same John 
Southcot and Thomas Bromley, the Recognizances of Thomas 
Edwards (servant of the aforesaid Anthony Marten) in the sum of forty 
pounds, and of the aforesaid Ralph Calveley, Bartholomew Yorke, 
Peter Pawlin and Anthony Bybye in the sum of eighty pounds each : 
For the appearance of the said Thomas Edwards at the next Gaol 
Delivery at Newgate, to answer to all such things as may be objected 
against him on the Queen's part. G. D. R., 6 June, ii Eliz. 

27 May, II Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John South- 
cot (one of the Queen's Justices "ad Placita coram ipsa Regina 
tenenda) of John Frye of the city of Westminster taillour, in the sum 
of twenty pounds, and of Richard Juxon of Westminster taillour, 
Richard Taillor of Westminster taillour, John Arnold of Sowthwarck 
CO. Surrey taillour, and Henry Smith of Redding co. Bark, yoman, in 
the sum of forty pounds each : For the appearance of Elizabeth Frye, 
wife of the aforesaid John Frye, at the next Gaol Delivery at Newgate, 
to answer to all such things as may be then and there urged to her on 
the Queen's part. G. D. R., 6 June, 11 Elizabeth. 

I June, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, near the highway at Edge- 
ware CO. Midd. on the said day, Richard Fage late of Wilsdon co. 
Midd. and his wife Elizabeth assaulted Dorothea Gawyn, and robbed 
her of a felt hatt worth sixteen pence, two linen neckercheves worth 
six-pence, a linen aporne worth four pence, and a linen raile worth 
four pence. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Richard Fage was sentenced to 
be hung. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Elizabeth Fage pleaded pregnancy : 
and afterwards, viz. at the Gaol Delivery of 16 January, 12 Eliz., she 
was found ' pregnant ' by a jury of matrons : and later still, viz. at the 
Gaol Delivery of 11 June, 13 Eliz., she was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 6 June, 11 Eliz. 

19 June, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fynchley co. Midd. on 
the said day, Geoffrey Poole late of London gentleman assaulted 
Edward Welshe husbandman, and murdered him by giving him with a 
sword a mortal wound on the left side of his breast, of which wound 
he then and there died instantly. Geoffrey Poole was at large. G. D. R., 
10 April, 12 Eliz. 

26 August, ii Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards Mathew Vincent of Ickenham co. 
Midd. not having lands tenements rents or service to the value of forty 
shillings a year, kept and used dogs for coursing hares, nets, ferrets and 
dogs for chasing by scent (leporarios canes retia ferrett' et odorniscos) : 
and further that he, in company with others, broke at Hillingdon co. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 6/ 

Midd. into the free Warren of Edward, earl of Darbie, and there hunted 
the rabbits of the said Earl. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 1 1 Eliz. 

lo October, ii Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. 
on the said day, and at divers times before and afterwards throughout 
five years, Elizabeth Mychell alias Spicer of the said parish has lived in 
adultery with Robert Spicer. G. S. P., . . . .,12 Eliz. 

2 February, 12 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johns Streteco. 
Midd. on the said day, William Tylynge late of London gardener 
stole six parcel-gilt silver spoons, worth fifty-four shillings, of the goods 
and chattels of John Tasker of London yoman. Putting himself 
'Guilty,' William Tylynge was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
10 April, 12 Eliz. 

15 March, 12, Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. 
on the said day William Chapman, late of London yoman stole a cloth 
tunic "coloris shepes coller" worth . . . ., of the goods and 
chattels of Francis Pigott ; and " unum parr" caligarum panni lanei 
coloris nigri vocat' a paire of breches ad valenciam \\s., vnum parr" 
calceorum ad valenciam \'md., et vnum al' parr' calceorum vocatorum 
' pompes ' ad valenciam viii^f." of the goods and chattels of Roger 
Bygges. Pleading 'Guilty,' William Chapman was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 10 April, 12 EHz. 

I April, 12 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherin's co. Midd. 
on the said day, Cecilia Barker widow, late of London spinster (vidua 
nuper de London' spinster) stole a black cloth kyrtell, worth eight 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Taylor. Putting herself 
' Not Guilty ' and holding to the plea, Cecilia Barker was acquitted : — 
(Po se non cul' nee rec' Id' quiet'). G. D. R., 10 April, 12 Eliz. 

— April, 12 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the night of the 
. . . . of the said month at . . . . co. Midd., Robert Deven- 
shere late of London yoman broke burglariously into the house of 
John Bamson, and stole therefrom a taffita hatt worth ten shillings, 
a felte hat worth two shillings, divers books worth four shillings, a 
case full of Spanish nedels worth ten shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Anthony Ryngewood, and a quilte worth ten shillings, and 
another coverlett worth ten shillings, and a pair of linen sheets, of 
the goods and chattels of John Bamson. Robert Devenshire put 
himself 'Not Guilty,' and did not retract. G. D. R., 10 April, 
12 Eliz 

3 November, 12 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johns Strete 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Richard Williams late of London yoman 
stole a pair of linen sheets worth four shillings, two tablecloths worth 
three shillings, a linen towell worth twelve pence and " a paire of 
gurnesey stockes," of the goods and chattels of Robert Bradforde. 

F 2 



68 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Putting himself ' Guilty,' Richard Williams pleaded his clergy : Where- 
upon William Pickeringe, following in behalf of the Queen, said that 
the prisoner was not entitled to the benefit of clergy, because under the 
name of Richard Phillippes alias Williams late of London yoman, 
for a certain felony committed by him at Highe Holbourne in former 
time, he was convicted a clerk and being burnt on his left hand was 
delivered to the keeping of the bishop of London, Ordinary of that 
place. To this, the record of the conviction being produced, the prisoner 
declared that he, Richard Williams now present, and the aforesaid 
Richard Phillippes alias Williams in former time convicted of felony 
were not one and the same person, but different persons, and begged 
that on that matter it might be enquired by the country. On the day 
appointed for this enquiry, Richard Williams having appeared under 
the custody of the gaoler, and the jury sworn to ascertain the truth 
having declared that the prisoner now present was the same person as 
the Richard Phillippes a/i'aj Williams, in former time convicted of felony 
and found to be a clerk, even as William Pickeringe had declared, 
it was ordered by the Court that he should be hung. G. D. R., i Dec, 
13 Eliz. 

4 March, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. Midd. 
on the night of the said day, Richard Hall yoman, Anthony Houghton 
yoman, John Hodgekynson taylor, and Anthony Powell taylor, all of 
Charterhouse lane co. Midd., with eight unknown disturbers of the 
peace, assembled riotously and, armed with clubs, knives, daggers 
and other weapons, exercised and took upon themselves the office of 
the constables of St. John's Strete, without the knowledge of the said 
constable, and made watches at Clerkenwell, and in the same watches 
made arrests of suspected persons, and then wilfully permitted the 
same suspected persons to escape. G. S. P. R., Easter, 13 Eliz. 

21 March, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Eastsmythefelde co. 
Midd. on the said day, Francisca Tenche alias Lukar late of London 
spinster stole a linen sheet worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Reginald Hollingeworthe. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Francisca 
pleaded that she was pregnant. Afterwards, at the Gaol Delivery made 
on 30 June 14 Elizabeth she produced the Queen's pardon of her 
aforesaid felony, sealed with the Great Seal and dated 24 December 
last past, " quam sibi humiliter petit allocari, super quo consideratum 
est quod eat inde sine die.'' G. D. R , 14 EHz. 

I April, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, John 
Machell of Hackney gentleman removed and carried away a certain 
footbridge, lying between Tottenham Wilde Marshe and a piece of 
land called the Ney in the Queen's highway at Tottenham, G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 13 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 69 

16 April, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, the Lady 
Elizabeth Dennis of St. Johns Strete co. Midd. widow stopt and 
closed a certain ancient public footway, leading from St. Johns Strete 
aforesaid to St. Johns Lane. G. S. P. R., Easter, 13 Eliz. 

20 April, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards, Helen, wife of Robert Norrys alias 
Okey of Saint Johnes Strete co. Midd. yoman, entertained persons of 
ill fame and kept ill order at the house of the said Robert in the said 
street. G. S. P. R., Easter, 13 Eliz. 

29 May, 13 Elizabeth. — -True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Stevens and John Bales, both of London tallow 
chaundlers, and Thomas Hadden of Hoxton co. Midd. monyer, made 
forcible and lawless entry on two messuages and two cottages and 
fifteen acres of land with appurtenances, being the freehold of Helen 
Harreyonge widow, and expelled the same Helen from them, and 
having so disseized her of them on the said i8th of May still keep her 
out of them. G. S. P. R-, Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

20 June, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at Wox- 
bridge co. Midd., Thomas Smythe of Wenloxbarne co. Midd. yoman, 
one of the Queen's takers and providers for wains and carts for ale and 
beer, by color of his office took extortionately five shillings of John 
Osmond, for the exoneration of the said John Osmond's wain : and 
also that in the same way and on the same day, he took and extorted 
thirteen shillings and eightpence at Ickenham co. Midd. from Thomas 
Nellam, and six shillings and eightpence at Ickenham from the afore- 
named John Osmond. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

13 July, 13 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, at Charterhouse co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Willowghbye late of London gentleman stole 
" vnam togam de mockadoe coloris blewe ad valenciam xk., vnum par' 
braccarum de coreo extract' cum serico coloris oerenge coller ad 
valenciam xis., vnam zonam de serico coloris purpell et ornatam cum 
argento," of the goods and chattels of Edward Deverox. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Willowghbye asked for the book, read like a 
clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D., . . . .,13 Eliz. 

18 July, 13 Elizabeth.- — True Bill that, on the said day at Hakney 
in the highway leading between Kyngsland and Newyngton, John 
Sheppard alias Coxe late of London shomaker assaulted Thomas 
Ferrys a bocher, and gave him with " a meate knyfe " in the fore part of 
his body, on the left side of his breast, a mortal wound of which he 
then and there died instantly. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Sheppard 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., ... ., 13 Eliz. 

20 July, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the said 
day, William Burte late of London yoman stole "unum par' caligarum 



70 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

vocatum a paire of man's hose extract' cum le mockadoe ad valenciam 
vl]s. v\\id., vnum gladium de ferra et calibe ad valenciam \]s. vid." of 
the goods and chattels of Thomas Mitton. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
William Burte was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . .,13 Eliz. 

20 August, 13 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. 
on the said day, Lewis Jones late of London yoman stole a green 
woollen-cloth cloak worth six shillings and eight pence, " unum dip- 
loidem de la canvas coloris yellowe ad valenciam iijj'.," a woollen 
covering worth twenty pence, a pair of knives worth two pence, a felte 
hatt worth eight pence, a pillow worth eight pence, and thirteen shil- 
lings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Hugh 
Nevill. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Lewis Jones was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R , 13 Eliz. 

23 August, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Phillipp late of London spinster stole 
three pieces of coined gold called soueraignes worth thirty shillings 
(tres pecias auri cuniat' Anglice voc' soueraignes ad valenciam xxx^.), 
two pieces of coined gold called Olde Angelles worth twenty shillings, 
and three pounds in numbered money, of the moneys of John Gatton. 
Elizabeth Phillipp put herself ' Guilty ' ; and afterwards at the Gaol 
Delivery of 3 Dec. 14 Eliz. she produced the Queen's special pardon 
under the Great Seal, dated 17 October 13 Eliz., which was allowed to 
her. G. D. R., . . . ., 13 Eliz. 

24 August, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Charterhowse Lane 
on the said day, William Whetley, late of London merchaunt tailor, 
stole and carried off a black woollen-cloth cloak worth thirty shillings, 
of the goods and chattels of some unknown man, then in the keep- 
ing of John Postern at Charterhowse Lane. Pleading ' Guilty,' 

William Whetley was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 

13 Eliz. 

2 September, 13 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Kentyshetowne co. 
Midd. on the said day, Adam Chatterton late of London inholder 
diverted a certain water-course, that used to run from a certain spring 
at Hampsted through Kentyshetowne towards London. G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

6 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, John Thrushe late of London woolpacker made two 
chanells called " a duble channell " in the King's Strete in West- 
minster, to the detriment and ruin of the same street : and That on the 
nth of the next preceding August he stopt a certain water-course per- 
taining to John Gibbes, that ought to flow through the land of the 
same John Gibbes. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

8 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordiche co. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 7 1 

Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
Ingram Jakson of Shordich aforesaid yoman entertained at his house 
vagabonds, suspected persons, masterless persons, and persons given to 
lust and luxury, to the evil and destructive example of their neighbours. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

16 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's 
Danes co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and after- 
wards, Henry Basse of the said parish butcher and his wife Elizabeth 
were, and that they still are, common disturbers of the peace, and pro- 
moters of discords likely to result in homicide. G. S. P. R., Michael- 
mas, 13 EUz. 

20 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clementes 
Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Timothy Doddersbye of Holbourne 
taylor, assaulted and beat Henry Reynoldes, one of the constables of 
the said parish of St. Clementes Danes, so that his life was despaired 
of. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

26 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Eastesmythefelde 
CO. Midd., pn the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
William Blunt gentleman maintained in his house divers unlawful 
games, viz., " dice cardes and bowles," and received there divers per-, 
sons of bad fame and conversation. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 13 Eliz. 

26 September, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stratford-at- 
Bowe CO. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and after- 
wards, Richard Garnett of the said place vintener, kept ill order and 
rule in his dwelling-house, against the commands and admonition oft- 
times given him by the constables there. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
13 Eliz. 

29 October, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's 
Danes without the Bars of the New Temple co. Midd., William Whenton 
and Lawrence Bell, both late of London yomen, stole a silver goblett 
worth fifty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Christofer Wood- 
ward vintner. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Whenton was sen- 
tenced to be hung. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Lawrence Bell pleaded 
his clergy. G. D. R., . . . ., 14 Eliz. 

5 November, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at 
Islington co. Midd. on the said day, John Gryffyth alias Gryffyn, late 
of London yoman, assaulted Dunstan Coxe and robbed him of fifteen 
pence in numbered moneys. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Gryffyth 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . .,14 Eliz. 

7 November, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stratford-at-bowe 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Robert Hodgskyne late of Ikham co. Kent 
gentleman, William Dutton late of Blackwall sailer, Elizabeth Dutton 
late of Blackwall wife of the aforesaid William, and John Heneage 



72 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

late of London laborer stole fifty-two shillings and sixpence in money, 
of the chattels and moneys of Robert Bridges, and a collar of bells for 
a little dog (et vnum le coller de canipanis pro parva cane) worth six- 
pence. Robert Hogeskyn and William Button were " extra prison'." 
Ehzabeth Button put herself ' Not Guilty ' and held to her plea, and 
in like manner John Henage "po se non cul nee rec." G. B. R., 
. . . ., 14 Eliz. 

8 November, 13 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Brayneford co. 
Midd. on the said day, Isabell Cornewall late of London spynster 
broke into the house of Joan Parker widow, and stole therefrom a 
silver ring worth ten pence, a purse worth four pence, and three 
shillings and eight pence in counted money. Putting herself ' Guilty,' 
Isabell pleaded that she was pregnant. G. B. R., . . . .,14 
Eliz. 

I Becember, t4 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackney co. 
Midd. on the highway, on the aforesaid day of Becember, Thomas 
Payne alias Savage, Richard Pryce, and John Haywood, all late of 
London yomen, assaulted Arthur Warde and stole from his person, a 
woollen-cloth cloak of sheepes coller worth ten shillings, a linen 
handkerchief worth six pence, " unum aliud pallium de le mocka- 
dowe vocatum a woman's cloake furred (?) with blacke conye ad valen- 
ciam xiij.f." of the goods and chattels of John Fuller, and a sword 
worth six shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Yeardeley. 
Putting themselves ' Guilty,' all three prisoners were sentenced to be 
hung. G. B. R., .... Jan., 14 Eliz. 

10 Becember, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at .... co. 
Midd. on the said day of Becember, John Jarrett, alias John Slaney 
late of Highe Holbourne yoman, stole a black woollen cloth cloak 
worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Tuppris. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' the prisoner pleaded his clergy ; whereupon 
William Pyckering urged that the prayer should not be granted, as, 
by the name of John Jarard late of London yoman, for a certain felony 
by him in former times committed at Harnesey co. Midd., the said 
John Jarrett alias Slaney was convicted a clerk, and after being 
burnt on the left hand was as a convicted clerk delivered to the custody 
of the Bishop of London, the Ordinary of that place ; to which the 
aforesaid John Jarrett pleaded that he was not the same person as the 
clerk so convicted under the name of John Jarard. At the ensuing 
Gaol Belivery, held on 15 February next following, ^ jury, chosen 
and sworn to discover the truth of the matter, having found the 
prisoner was the same person as the clerk in former time convicted under 
the name of John Jarard, it was decreed by the Court that he should 
be hung. G. B. R., . . . . Jan., 14 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 73 

30 December, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Mathew Bowcher alias Bowsser late of the said 
city gentleman broke into and entered the dwelling-house of Richard 
Topclyff, and stole therefrom a pair of "knytt netherstockes of 
worsted " worth fifteen shillings, and a linen garment worth forty 
shillings, of the goods a,nd chattels of Richard Candishe. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Mathew Bowcher asked for the book. — Also, on the 
same file, another True Bill against the same Mathewe Bowcher gentle- 
man, for stealing on the same day from Richard Topclyff's dwelling- 
house a woollen-cloth cloak of raarbell colour worth . . . ., and 
" a dublett of millen carsy lyned with sarsenett " worth twenty-six 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Curteis. — Also, on the 
same file, a third True Bill against the same Mathewe Bowcher 
gentleman, for stealing on the same day from the same house "a 
blacke wrote velvett gowne furred with blacke conye " worth fifteen 
pounds, " a blacke velvett coate layde withe golde and silke lace lyned 
with tafita " worth . . . . ; an " imbrodered garde of silke " 
worth ten pounds, a " blacke .... dublett " worth three pounds 
six shillings and eight pence, " duo par braccarum velvetti vocat' twoo 
pare of blacke .... satten and silke stockes " worth twenty 
pounds, a linen covering of a bed worth three pounds, with divers 
other articles including " garters '' worth three pounds, of the goods and 
chattels of the said Richard Topclyff. Putting himself ' Guilty ' to all 
three indictments ; Mathew Bowcher asked for the book. G. D. R., 
. . . . Jan., 14 Eliz. 

I January, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johns Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Sir George Penruddock knt. of the said street 
encroached on the highway thereof to the quantity of two feet, by a 
house built there by him. G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz. 

I April, 14 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hornesey co. Midd. on view of the body of Hugh Moreland late 
of Hornesey yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 29 March 
last past, between three and four p.m., the said Hugh Moreland and 
a certain Henry Yonge of the same place yoman were together in 
the yard of the house of Thomas Aglyonby of Hornesey aforesaid 
gentleman, when they quarrelled and fought, the said Hugh Moreland 
having in his hands a shovel and the said Henry Yonge being armed 
with " a shackfork " ; when in the affray had between them Henry 
Yonge with the said ' shackfork ' gave Hugh Moreland in his left eye 
a blow, of which he died on the present first day of April. G. D. R., 
22 May, 14 Eliz. 

7 April, 14 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Fynnesbury on view of the body of John Stocker late of 



74 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

London shomaker, there lying dead : With verdict that, on the same 
day between two and three p.m., the said John Stocker was in the 
street called Bysshoppes Gate Streate within the city of London, to- 
gether with a certain John Tyson late of London yoman and John 
Keys also late of London yoman, when the same John Stocker and 
John Tyson exchanged insulting words, after which speech John 
Tyson, having business to do at a certain house called the Red Lyone 
at Islington with a certain William Peirson of Buckby co. Hertford 
yoman and a certain John Knighte of the same parish and county, 
went off to Islington ; and That, seeing whither he was going, John 
Stocker with malice lay in wait, to intercept and assault the same 
Tyson on his return ; and That afterwards being together in Fynnes- 
bury Feild the two men fought together, John Stocker having a sword 
in his right hand and a dagger in his left hand, whilst John Tyson 
had a sword in his right hand, and in his left hand a cloak; and 
That in the affray, thus fought between them in Fynnesbury Feild, 
John Tyson with his sword gave John Stocker under the left side of 
his breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. 
G. D. R., 2 2 May, 14 Eliz. 

10 April, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Friarnebarnett on the 
aforesaid day, Evan Davie late of London tayler stole two black 
woollen-cloth cloaks worth thirty shillings, two linen shjrts worth five 
shillings, " duo superinterula panni linei vocat' shirtebandes ad valen- 
ciam iiji'. iiii;/.," a hat worth twelve pence, "unum par calligarum panni 
lanei vocat' a pare of nether stockes ad valenciam xvi^., vnum aliud par 
caligarum vocat' a pare of Jarsey nether stockes ad valenciam iis. vid." 
and a pair of gloves worth two pence, of the goods and chattels of John 
Byrkehead. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Evan Da\-ie asked for the book, read 
like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz. 

— April, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill, on the presentment of Thomas 
Wetherley and William Kyrton, Searchers of tiles (Scrutatores tegu- 
larum vocatarum tiles) co. Midd., appointed in accordance with the 
form of the statute of 1 7 Ed. IV. in this matter provided, that, .... 
Wynchester, John Wynchester, Thomas . . . ., Richard Read- 
inge, John Readinge, William ... ., Henry Barynger, all of 
Ruyslippe tylemakers, who dug and threw out earth for making tiles 
at Ruyslippe aforesaid before i November 13 Eliz., scilicet xviij 
October of the said year, did not move or turn the same earth as they 
should have done before the first day of February next following. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 14 Eliz. 

— April, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in consideration of service 
to be rendered to Sir Thomas Gresham knt., Richard George of Hes- 
ton CO. Midd. baker received on 20 February 14 Eliz. of the said Sir 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS* ROLLS. 75 

Thomas a lyvery cote, which the said Richard George used through 

the space of two months next following at Heston and elsewhere in 

the said county, " whereas the same Richard George is not nor ever 

has been the familiar servant or officer of the said Sir Thomas Gres- 

ham knt, nor a scholar learned and instructed in either of the laws 

(nee in lege vna seu altra eruditus aut instructus). — With similar true 

Bills, on the same parchment, against (i) Robert Gridyom alias Grid- 

yron of Westminster yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of Sir 

Robert Constable knt. ; (2) William Burton of Hackeney yoman for 

taking and wearing the livery of Robert, earl of Leicester ; (3) John 

NichoUson of Hackeney yoman, for taking and wearing the livery of 

the same Earl ; (4) Henry Warley of Hackeney yoman, for taking and 

wearing the livery of Sir Ralph Sadler; (5) George Lynnett of 

Hackeney yoman for taking and wearing the livery of John Uudlaye 

gentleman ; (6) Geoffrey Rochebell of Hampton co. Midd. yoman, 

for taking and wearing the livery of Sir Owen Hopton knt. ; (7) 

Thomas Adams of Twyckenham yoman, for taking and wearing the 

livery of Sir Thomas Gresham knt. ; (8) John Bridges of Brayneforde 

CO. Midd. yoman, who without being the domestic servant of Sir 

Francis KnoUes knt. or a literate learned in either law, was retained 

in Sir Francis's service by an argreement made between them on 20 

February 14 Elizabeth, since which time the said Thomas Adams at 

Brayneford and elsewhere has worn the said Sir Francis Knolles's livery. 

G. S. P. R., Easter, 14 Eliz. 

4 May, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackney on the said 
day, Richard Neyler, late of London fishmonger, stole certain hairs 
worth three pence from the tail of Henry Warley's mare, and certain 
hairs worth three pence from the tail of John Finkes gelding. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Richard Neyler was sentenced to stand in the pillory 
at Cheapside (ponatur super coUistrigium in Cheape Side London). 
G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz. 

21 May, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at 
Islington on the aforesaid day, John Skargill laborer assaulted, beat 
and bound William Brian, and robbed him of a sworde " de ferro 
et calibe," called a Rapier and worth eight shillings, and of five 
shillings in numbered money. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Skar- 
gill was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 22 May, 14 Eliz. 

23 May, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Giles- 
in-the-Fields, Robert Corbett late of London laborer stole . . . pairs 
of leather shoes worth ten shillings, " duo paria calceorum de correo 
Anglice vocata ii paire of pantacles of lether ad valenciam \\s. \\v\d." 
and two paires of lether bootes worth ten shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of John Tandi. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Robert Corbett asked 



7^ MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz. 

31 May, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill, that William Shawe of Edmon- 
ton CO. Midd. yoman, who on the said day had at Edmonton " vnam 
carucam vocatam a ploughe or draught," will not work with any cart 
and other necessaries for the reparation of the highway there. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz. 

26 June, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields on the said day, James Kynge of London yoman 
stole " vnum diploidem panni linei vocatum A Canvas Dublett ad 
valenciam xxs., vnum par braccarum panni lanei coloris Horsefleshe 
coler ad valenciam xxvij. vn]d.," of the goods and chattels of Robert 
Jones. Putting himself ' Guilty,' James Kynge was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 30 June, 14 Eliz. 

2 August, 14 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Chancery Lane on view of the body of Lucy Jones, late of 
Chancery Lane spinster, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
night of the first inst. between ten and eleven p.m., the said Lucy 
Jones was at Chancery -.Lane in God's and the Queen's peace in the 
house of her master, a certain Thomas Hearne cook, when at the 
instigation of the devil he made an assault on the said Lucy, and 
with a sword of iron and steel worth eight shillings and four pence 
murdered her, by striking her on the lower parts of her legs and on 
her thighs, giving her six several wounds in them, and in her left 
thigh one deep wound, of which she died instantly. At his subsequent 
arraignment Thomas Hearne put himself 'Not Guilty' of the murder, 
and was found guilty of manslaughter, when he asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 
14 Eliz. 

7 August, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Milende co. Midd. on 
the said day, and at divers times before and afterwards, Richard 
Bailey of the said place baker bought " faggotes by the greate " to sell 
to the Queen's lieges at one penny for each faggot, and before so 
selling them withdrew the " greate woode " from the said faggots to 
the deception and injury of buyers. — With another True Bill that, on 
10 July last past and at divers times before and afterwards, the same 
Richard Bailey made " cakes " of unwholesome grain and sold them 
at Milende. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz. 

31 August, 14 Elizabeth.-:— True Bill that, on the said day, and 
at divers times before and afterwards, John Clayton of Knightesbridge 
CO. Midd. yoman, maintained an unlawful game called Shovegrote in 
his dwelling-house there. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 Eliz. 

17 September, 14 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. "J-J 

Danes without the Bars of the New Temple on the said day, William 
Carley late of London yoman stole a paire of linen sheetes worth 
twenty shillings, and thirty-six shillings in numbered moneys, of the 
goods chattels and moneys of Anne Gilbert widow. Putting himself 
' Guilty,' William Carley was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 
14 EUz. 

28 September, 14 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, whereas Alice 
Arthur late of Hendon spinster was on the nth of the aforesaid 
month indicted before John Southcott (one of the Queen's Justices for 
pleas to be held before her) and other Justices, and before them 
convicted of vagrancy, and was at that time retained in the service 
of John Naylor of Wenloxebarne co. Midd., she departed from the 
service of the said John Naylor against his will on the said 28th of 
September. Wherefore it was adjudged that Alice Arthur be whipt 
severely, and burnt on the right ear. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 14 
EHz. 

25 November, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Phillpott of 
Christchurch co. Southampton yoman wrote and counterfeited a certain 
writing in the name of his master Ambrose Kellaway esq., and counter 
feited the sign-manual of the said Ambrose, without the said Ambrose's 
knowledge or authority, which writing he (the said John Phillpott) 
directed to Richard Howson of London citizen and mercer, that the 
same Richard would send to the same Ambrose, by the hands of the 
same John, two yards of velvett of the price of forty shillings ; which 
two yards of velvett the said John received of the said Richard without 
payment of the forty shillings by colour of the said writing, and fraudu- 
lently converted to his own use. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

3 December, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. John's Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Spaldinge late of London yoman stole 
" vnum annulum vocat' a ringe of wyre " worth thirty shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Richard Weste. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
William Spalding was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 18 May, 15 
Eliz. 

5 December, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Saynt John's Strete 
on the said day of December, Richard Sutton late of London yoman 
stole a felt hatt worth fifteen shillings, and a pair " de le galligascoyns 
panni lanei coloris nigri ad valericiam xxxiijs.," of the goods and 
chattels of Manus Linthey. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Richard Sutton 
pleaded his clergy, when William Pickering in the Queen's behalf urged 
that the plea should not be admitted, as under the name of Richard 
Dutton, for a felony by him in former time committed at Tottenham, 
the prisoner had on the same plea been burnt on the left hand, and 



78 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

delivered to the Bishop of London, of that place the Ordinary. At 
the next Gaol Delivery a jury, chosen and sworn to discover the truth 
of the matter, having found that Richard Dutton and Richard Sutton 
were one and the same person, the said Richard was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., i8 May, 15 Eliz. 

II January, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. 
on the said day, Jane Jones late of London spinster stole " vnam ricam 
panni linei vocat' a kercheif " worth five pence, and "vnam amiculam 
panni linei vocat' a neckercher " worth four pence, of the goods and 
chattels of William Danyell. At the head of the bill, this memoran- 
dum, " Cognovit indicamentum ; consideratum est quod confitebitur 
ofTensam suam in Ecclesia de Harnesey proxima die dominica in 
presencia parochianorum ibidem." She confessed the indictment : it 
was adjudged that she should confess her offence in Hornsey church 
on the next Lord's Day, in the presence of the parishioners. G. D. R., 
16 Feb., 15 Eliz. 

22 January, 15 Elizabeth. — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the 
parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., on view of the body 
of John Lowbery late of the said parish shooraaker there lying dead : 
With Verdict that, at nine p.m. of the 19th inst., the said John 
Lowbery and a certain Hugh Yenans late of London shoomaker were 
together in the kitchin of the house of their master, Peter Peterson, at 
St. Martin's-le-Grand in London, when they quarrelled and abused one 
another with speech; that on the 21st instant., mindful of this dispute, 
John Lowbery and Hugh Yenans went forth from the same house 
together to a certain field called Mownt Myllefield in the said parish 
of St. Giles, with the intention of fighting, John Lowbery having a 
sword in his right and a buckler in his left hand, and John Yenans 
having in both his hands a pycked staffe ; that thus armed they fought 
together in the said field on the said day between the hours of seven 
and eight a.m. ; that after they had fought there for some time, Hugh 
Yenans withdrew himself from the said John Lowbery to a certain place 
called Austen's Cloase near the same field, and returned his sword to 
its scabbard ; that afterwards on the same day, more contumelious 
words having been exchanged between them, Hugh Yenans returned to 
John Lowbery at Mownt Myllefeild, when the latter drew his sword 
and the fight was renewed ; that in the ensuing affray Hugh Yenans 
with his pike gave John Lowbery in his left thigh a wound, of which he 
died within two hours ; and that in so doing Hugh Yenans slew and 
murdered the said John Lowbery. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz. 

23 January, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Brigitte in Flete strete London in the ward of Farringdon without 
London, Henry Welshe late of London woodmonger assaulted Thomas 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. • 79 

Vaughan late of London woodmonger, and with a piece of wood called 
a billett, which he (Henry Welshe) held in his right hand, struck him 
on the right side of the body, giving him a wound of which he died 
on I February next following. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz. 

23 January, 15 EnzABETH.^True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Cockerell and John Bullock, both late of 
London yomen, stole awhite-grey geldingworth three pounds, and a darke 
grey gelding worth fifty shillings, and a saddle worth ten shillings, of 
the goods and chattels of John Gyrton at Westminster. Putting them- 
selves ' Guilty,' both prisoners were sentenced to be hung. Afterwards, 
at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate 28 May 16 Elizabeth, John Bullock 
produced the Queen's special pardon of his felony, granted to him 
under the Great Seal by Letters patent, dated 22 February 16 Elizabeth. 
G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz. 

9 February, 15 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hounslow in the parish of Heaston co. Midd. on the view of 
the body of Marie Cheese alias Pyckle, an infant six days old, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that Joan Cheese of Hounslow spinster gave 
birth on the first day of the instant month to the said infant in a public 
place at Hounslow and in doing so fell by mischance upon the ground, 
by which fall the infant's head was injured, so that she died through 
mischance and from no other cause on the seventh day of the same 
month. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz. 

12 February, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Henry Morrys of 
Higheholborne co. Midd., on the aforesaid day at his dwelling-house 
there, unlawfully cooked a legge of mutton, which after being so pre- 
pared by him, was there eaten by divers persons. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
15 Eliz. 

12 February, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell on 
the said day, Allexander Asheforde of Grubstrete bowyer assaulted 
beat and wounded Anne Jenkynson widow, so that her life was de- 
spaired of. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

13 February, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackney co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Beckett late of London yoman stole " duo 
mallua ferri vocat' slegges ad valenciam ws." of the goods and chattels 
of Richard Harrison, and a piece of iron called a culter, of the goods 
and chattels of Ipolit Lynnett. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Beckett 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 Eliz. 

x6 February, 15 Elizabeth. — The appeal of Henry Lobery, brother 
and next heir of John Lobery, in his own person appealing Hugh Yenans 
late of London shoemaker, in the custody of Richard Pipe and Nicholas 
Woodroof sherif of Middlesex, of the death of the aforesaid John Lobery: 
With the Verdict of jurors, Who (at the next Gaol Delivery of i6 



8o MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

March 1 5 Elizabeth, when Hugh Yenans has declared himself ' Not 
Guilty ' of the murder of John Lobery under the circumstances set 
forth in the abstract of the Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 23 January 
15 Eliz.), Say upon their oath " that the aforesaid Hugh Yenans is not 
guilty of the murder nor of the felonious and voluntary slaying of the 
said John Lobery with malice aforethought, but is guilty of the homi- 
cide and wilful slaying of the same John Lobery " : the same jurors 
further finding " qd. idem Hugo nulla habet terras tenementa nee 
catalla." Whereupon the samCi Hugh asks for the book, reads like a 
clerk and is delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 15 EHz. 

25 February, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at a certain place 
called " le Parke Corner " at St. James near Charingcrosse on the said 
day about five p.m., Richard Iseham late of London laborer assaulted 
a certain John Mercer alias Ashe, then and there riding in the highway, 
with the intention of robbing him the said John. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
15 Eliz. 

3 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards, John Cuttler of Higholbourne 
CO. Midd. crosebomaker, being unmarried and not retained in the 
service of any one, exercised the art and faculty " factoris balistarum 
vocat' A Crosebomaker " in his dwelling-house there, against the 
form of the Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 
Eliz. 

3 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards, Nicholas Bedlowe, Gabriel Playce, 
Roger Turtill, John Bradshawe, Barnard Livard an alien, and Roger 
Asshemore, all unmarried men and duly instructed tailors, having 
neither lands nor tenements to the yearly value of forty shillings, nor 
chattels to the value of ten pounds, nor farm or tenure in tillage, exer- 
cised the art of tailors in their several houses in Higheholborne (not 
being retained in the service of any-one), against the form of the 
Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

3 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at his mansion-house in 
Higheholbourne on the said day and at divers times before and after- 
wards, Walter Arundell skynner, an unmarried man not in the service 
of any-one, exercised the art and faculty of a skynner, against the 
form of the Statute in this case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

10 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Woxbridge co: Midd. 
on the said day, William Welles late of London clerk stole a linen 
sheet and a linen smocke worth three shillings, and a linen napkin and 
a linen partelett worth twelve pence. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William 
Welles produced letters of Hugh, bishop of Llandaff, under his epis- 
copal seal, dated at Matharne a.d. 1567 and 10 Eliz., certifying that 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 8 1 

William Wells was a clerk in holy orders ," which letters being allowed 
to the prisoner by the Court, he was delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., i6 March, 15 Eliz. 

12 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on 
the said day, Peter Massey, his wife Agnes Massey, Richard Clement, 
Edward Hutchyn and John Aleigh, strong and fit for labour, but 
having neither masters nor lawful vocations whereby to get their means 
of living, were vagrants, and have wandered about other parts of the 
same county. Whereupon it was ordered that each of the said vagrants 
should be whipt severely and burnt on the right ear, according to the 
statute in that case provided. Afterwards Laurence Nasshe of Fynnes- 
berrie yoman came forward and took Edward Hutchyn into his service, 
binding himself in the sum of five pounds to retain the said Edward 
for an entire year. In like manner Francis Crompton took Richard 
Clement into his service for an entire year, binding himself in the same 
sum to keep him for a year, and at the end of the term to bring him to 
the General Session of the Peace, or come there with proof of his 
death. G. D. R., 16 March, 15 Eliz. 

15 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ratclyf co. Midd. on 
the said day, John Cooke, John Tanny and Mathew Furlonge, being 
over fourteen years of age strong of body, but having neither lands, 
nor masters, nor lawful means of livelihood were vagrants, and had 
been vagrants in other parts of the same county. On which it was 
adjudged that each of the three vagrants should be flogged severely 
and burnt on the right ear. Afterwards, James Forman of White- 
chapel gentleman took John Tanny into his service, and John Russell 
of the parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate silkewever took Mathew 
Furlonge into his service for a year ; each of the two masters being 
bound in the sum of five pounds to keep his servant for an entire year, 
and at the expiration of the term to produce him, or sufficient proof of 
his death, at General Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 16 March, 
IS Eliz. 

17 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highholborne co. 
Midd. and elsewhere in the same county on the said day, Nicholas 
Welshe, Anthony Musgrove, Hugh Morice, John Thomas, Philip 
Thomas, Alice Morice and Katherine Hevans, being over fourteen 
years of age, and strong and fit for labour, were masterless vagrants 
without any lawful means of subsistence. Whereupon it was decreed 
that each of the said vagrants should be whipt severely and burnt on 
the right ear. G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

25 March, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Eltham co. Kent in 
the highway leading from Woolwyche to St. Mary Cray, George Browne 
late of London gentleman assaulted George Saunders late citizen and 

G 



82 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

merchant-taylor of London, and murdered him : And That, knowing 
him to have committed the said murder, Roger Symes late of the 
parish of St. Gabriel in Fanchurche Streate yoman, on the 26th of 
March, 15 Eliz., and at divers subsequent times received, comforted 
and aided the same George Browne. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Roger 
Symes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 8 May, 15 Eliz. 

27 March, 15 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields 
on the said day, Henry Amptill and Roger Mascall, both of the said parish 
brewers, set at large certain suspected persons, whom William Westone, 
a hedborowe of the said parish, had taken in a certain tenement of the 
said Henry Amptill, and had by virtue of his office imprisoned. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 15 Eliz. 

9 April, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Joan Twychell late of the said parish spinster stole " a 
petecote vpper bodied with red mockadowe " worth five shillings, eight 
pieces of linen cloth called kerchefes worth five shillings and three 
pence, three linen crosclothes worth sixpence, a worsted apron worth 
sixteen pence, a linen pillowbere worth eight pence, and a linen smocke 
worth sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Magdalene Hardinge 
widow. "Et p'dca Johanna Twychell po se cul ca null pl'itat qd. est 
pregnans Et comp't' est p' sacr'm matronarum qd. est pregn' : I'o 
rep'." G. D. R., 8 May, 15 Ehz. 

23 April, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Burfield late of London yoman stole a 
black woollen-cloth cloak worth ten shillings, and an English book 
called a Bible worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Barnard 
Marcus alias Gilham. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Burfield was 
sentenced to be hung ; but afterwards, viz. at the Gaol Delivery of 
2 Sept. 15 Eliz. he asked for the book, read like a clerk and was 
delivered to the Ordinary. At the head of the bill, " Po se cul ca null 
sus' " ; and at the foot, " Et postea scilt' ad deliberacionem gaole pre- 
dicte hie fact 1 1''°- die Septemb' anno xv°. p'dco coram Thoma Offeley, 
Alex'o Avenon militibus et Will'o Fletewood Recordatore London 
p'dcus Will'm's Burfield petiit librum legit vt cl'icus et tradit' Ordinario." 
G. D. R, 8 May, 15 Eliz. 

25 April, 15 Elizabeth. ^ — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the 
parish of the Blessed Mary-de-le-Strond co. Midd., on view of the 
body of Thomas Adderton late of London yoman, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that on the 24th inst. John Jeynes late of London was 
in St. Paul's Church between three and four p.m., when Thomas 
Adderton came to him, and exchanged insulting words with him ; and 
that afterwards Thomas Adderton went out of the church and waited 
in the churchyard till he saw John Jeynes come out of the church, 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 83 

when he drew out his sword with his right hand and his dagger with 
his left hand, and assaulted the said John Jeynes, who trying to get out 
of his assailant's way withdrew for the space of twenty yards even to a 
dunghill, beyond which he could not go by reason of the crowd of 
men there : when he drew his sword in self-defence, and with it gave 
the said Thomas Adderton a wound, of which he died within the space 
of an hour in the said parish of St. Mary of the Strond. G. D. R., 
17 June, 15 Eliz. 

18 May, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at Wilsdon 
CO. Midd., Simon Platte of Wilsdon co. Midd. laborer stole " tres 
pecias auri cuniati vocat' angelles ad valenciam xxxj-., unam aliam 
peciam auri cuniati vocat' a suiferen ad valenciam xs.," and twelvepence 
in numbered money, of the chattels and moneys of John Walbancke. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' Simon Platte was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz. 

23 May, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Jones Streate co. 
Midd. on the night of the said day, Richard Stubbes and John Barlooe, 
both late of London laborers, broke burglariously into the house of 
William Dawes, then being at rest, and stole therefrom a " horse-fleshe 
coUored " woollen cloak worth twenty shillings, a pair of black woollen 
breeches worth three shillings, "vnam diploidem de blewe-striped 
sackclothe anglice vocatam A Dowblette of blewe-striped sackclothe ad 
valenciam iis. viiii/.," and four pounds in numbered money, of the 
goods, chattels and moneys of Edward Elt then living there. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Richard Stubbes was sentenced to be hung : but John 
Barlooe " po se non cul nee rec." G. D. R., 17 June, 15 EUz. 

31 May, 15 Elizabeth. — Iqnuisition-post-mortem, taken on the 
said day at Whitechappell co. Midd. on view of a male infant, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 27th inst. between ten and eleven 
a.m., Jane Stanly, late of London spinster, gave birth to the said 
male child in a certain field called Cookes Cloase at Whitechappell, 
and forthwith at the instigation of the devil assaulted the said male 
child, which was born alive, and murdered it by crushing the child's 
head with both her hands, so that it died then and there instantly. 
At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that on her arraignment. 
Jane Stanly put herself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 17 June, IS Eliz. 

7 June, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stepney on the said day, 
Jane Page of London spinster stole " vnum annulum auri vocatum a 
hande in hande ad valenciam vi.r. viiid. et tres pecias annuli aurei 
v'catas three pieces of a rynge called a deathes heade ad valenciam 
\is. viii^.," of the goods and chattels of a certain unknown man. 
G. D. R., 17 June, 15 Eliz. 

G 2 



84 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

15 June, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Amy Gooderiche, Henry 
Churche, Henry Lyde and Roger Kynward, being over fourteen years 
old, strong of body and fit for work, and having no -masters or lawful 
means of livelihood, were vagrants at Fynnesberrie co. Midd. on the 
said day, and have been vagrants at divers other places of the same 
county — " Super quo consideratum est quod quilibet predictorum 
Amie Gooderiche, Henrici Churche, Henrici Lyde et Rogeri Kynward 
graviter flagelletur et cremetur in dextra auricula.'' G. D. R., 17 June, 
15 Eliz. 

31 August, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harmondsworthe co. 
Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
Nicholas Gibbes husbandman had exercised the office "emptoris 
et venditoris grani vocat' badgers, loders, laders, kydders, or carriers of 
corne and graine,'' against the form of the statute. G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 15 Eliz. 

2 September, 15 Elizabeth. — True ■ Bill that, at Enfield co. Midd. 
on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John 
Hunesdon of the said parish exercised the office of a buyer and 
seller of grain, called a badger, loder, kydder or carrier of corne or 
grain, against the form of the statute in that matter provided. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 15 Eliz. 

8 October, 15 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Acton co. Midd. 
on the said day of October, William Smyth late of Acton aforesaid 
laborer bought of Ralph Cokerell, rector of Acton, eight loads of 
wheat " in garbis " worth sixteen pounds, seven wainloads " de silignis 
in garbis " worth fourteen pounds, and ten wainloads of oats 
(avenarum in garbis) worth ten pounds, with the' intention of selling 
the grain therefore for forty pounds, and then and there ingrossed 
the same grain, against the form of the statute in that case provided, 
G. D. R., 15 Feb. 16 Eliz. 

II December, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day of December, Joan Ellyse spinster alias wife of W"illiam 
Ellyse late of the said city brewer, practised witchcraft against and -on 
four horses worth eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of Edward 
Williamson of the same city yoman, so that she destroyed and killed 
them ; against the Queen's peace and the form of the statute, in that 
case provided. — Also, on the same file, three other True Bills against 
the same Joan Ellyse for practising witchcraft &c. — viz. (i) for 
bewitching William Crowche laborer of Westminster on 16 Feb. 14 
Eliz. so that he was wasted in his body and lay languishing and " muti- 
lated " for four months from the said date; (2) for bewitching, at 
Westminster on 21 July, 14 Eliz., a certain cow worth forty shillings, 
of the goods and chattels of Edward Williamson, so that it died ; and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 85 

(3) for bewitching the same Edward Williamson of Westminster, on 
the 13 Oct. 14 Eliz. at Westminster, so that he lay languishing and 
mutilated, and was wasted and consumed in his body for three 
months. Joan EUyse put herself ' Guilty ' to all these indictments ; 
but judgment was not delivered on her in respect to them, because 
she was already sentenced to be hung, in consideration of a previous 
indictment for witchcraft. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

7 January, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Lincoln's Inne 
CO. Midd.'on the said day, George Gerlington late of London yoman, 
stole a white gelding, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Harvey. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' George Gerlington was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 16 Eliz. 

17 January, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hillingdon co. 
Midd. on the night of the said day, William Wyddyns late of London 
smythe broke burglariously into the house of William Robyns, and 
stole therefrom two iron chest-lockes worth twenty pence, two dozen 
iron horse-shoes worth three shillings, five hundred iron nails called 
" hobbe nails " worth fifteen pence, and an iron wedge worth eight 
pence. William Wyddyns put himself ' Guilty,' and died in prison. 
G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Ehz. 

I February, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Enfeild co. Midd. 
on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, William 
Brooke and William Newman senior of the said place husbandmen 
" occupaverunt officium et facultatem emptorum et venditorum grani 
vocatorum badgers, loders, kydders and carriers of come and grayne 
sine licencia contra formam statuti inde editi et provisi." G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 16 Eliz. 

3 March, 16 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Enfield co. Midd. on 
the said day of March and at divers times before and afterwards, 
Robert Browne, Francis Conde, John Sherwoode and Robert Hare, all 
of the said place husbandmen, "exercebant officium et accionem 
emptorum et venditorum grani vocatorum badgers, loders, kydders and 
carriers of come or graine," in contempt of the Queen and against 
the form of the statute in that case provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
16 Eliz. 

5 March, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Giles-without-Criplegate, co. Midd. on the said day, William Tyler 
late of London laborer, a lazy and cunning fellow, cosened Thomas 
Weare of the said parish out of two several sums of money, by repre- 
senting that he was in possession of certain acres of wood growing 
near Tottenham, which he had bought of Lord Compton, who out of 
his good will to the deponent had himself measured and marked out 
the wood for him : that further, to get Thomas Weare's confidence, the 



86 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

same William Tyler represented himself, as staying and living in the 
house of Sir Hugh Cholmondeley knt. at Harnesy alias Harry ngay co. 
Midd. ; that by these false representations the said William Tyler 
induced Thomas Weare to give him an order for a hundred cartloads of 
the said wood, to give him four pence "nomine finis viz. in Earnest" 
on the bargain for the wood, and yet further to give him twenty 
shillings in partial prepayment of the price agreed upon for the hun- 
dred loads of wood ; whereas it appeared on enquiry that William 
Tyler had no wood to sell, and was not living at Harnesey,'but was a 
cheat. Having put himself ' Guilty,' William Tyler was sentenced to 
the pillory at Fynnesbury (Po se cull et adjudicatur pillorie apud 
Fynnesbury in com. Midd.) G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

16 March, 16 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Knightesbridge co. Midd. on the view of the body of Richard 
Coleman of the said place yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the same Richard Coleman was slain with a sword by Richard Cooke 
yoman in an affray, arising out of contention respecting the right of 
the same Richard Coleman and one Thomas Fearne yoman, to cut 
down a certain elm at Knightesbridge at the command of their master, 
William Mustyan of the said place gentleman ; and that Richard 
Stutte alias Pratt yoman aided and abetted the same Richard Cooke 
to perpetrate the said manslaughter. Richard Stutte put himself ' Not 
Guilty ' and Richard Cooke was at large, at the next Gaol Delivery. 
G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

17 March, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster, on the 
said day, John Tegg, Thomas Cockerell and Edward Cole, late of 
London yomen, stole an ell and half of black silk called vellure worth 
nine shillings, six ells of canvas worth fourteen shillings, with divers 
other articles of drapery (including four-and-a-half yards of white 
mockado worth seven shillings and six pence) of the goods and chattels 
of Edmund Milles. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' the three prisoners 
asked for benefit of clergy, but this was denied to them by the 
Justices, in consideration of the sufficient evidence that on the r3th 
day of the same March they had broken burglariously into the man- 
sion-house of the aforesaid Edmund Milles at Senock co. Kent, when 
he and his family were in the same house, and had taken therefrom 
certain goods and chattels; in which case benefit of clergy was removed 
by the statute recently publisht and provided. Wherefore it was 
decreed that John Tegg and Thomas Cockerell should be hung by the 
neck &c. But it seemed well to the Court to reprieve Edmund Cole 
before judgment for further consideration. (Ideo consideratum est 
quod vterque predictorum Johannis et Thome suspendatur per collum 
&c. Et prefatus Edwardus repri ante judicium quia Curia vult inde 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. Zj 

auisari &c.) And afterwards at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate made 
on 1 8 February, 17 Eliz., the aforesaid Edward Cole produced Queen's 
pardon under the Great Seal, granted to him by letters patent, dated 
15 December of the same 17th year of Her Highness's reign. 
G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

i8 March, 16 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Thomas Smyth 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the same 
Thomas Smyth died within the gaol on the same 18th inst., by Divine 
Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

29 March, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harrowehill co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Allen, Elizabeth Turner, Humfrey Foxe, Henry 
Bower and Agnes Wort, being over fourteen years old and having no 
lawful means of livelihood were vagrants and had been vagrants in. 
other parts of the country. Sentenced to be flogged severely and 
burnt on the right ear. G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

8 April, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stratford-at-boo on the 
said day, William John late of London yoman stole a cheste worth 
two shillings, two silver spoons worth thirteen shillings and foUr-pence, 
four gold rings and sixteen precious stones called perles worth six 
pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, a piece of black silk called 
tafBta worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, and eight pounds in 
numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Robert 
Bridges. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William John asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 
2 6 April, 16 Eliz. 

9 April, 16 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Evans late of 
London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the same John 
Evans died in the gaol on the 9th inst. by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 
26 April, 16 Eliz. 

15 April, 16 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., on view of the body of John 
Holdemes late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that the said John Holdernes, being sick and weak of a certain 
disease called consumption, died on the same isth inst. at the said 
parish, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 April, t6 Eliz. 

26 April, 16 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Weedon late of 
London smith, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said William 
Weedon died in the gaol on the same 26th inst. by Divine Visitation. 
G. D. R., 26 April, 16 Eliz. 

23 May, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, William 



88 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Paddye of Hadley co. Midd. gentleman, Thomas Rede of Southe- 
mymes co. Midd. husbandman, and Nicholas Crabb of Northe- 
mymes co. Midd. yoman, broke into the Queen's chase called End- 
fielde Chase, hunted the deer and wild animals there, and killed " unam 
damam." G. D., . . . . Eliz. 

4 June, i6 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Shoones late of Harmondesworth co. Midd. 
yoman stole a browne gelding worth twenty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Thomas Doo. — Also, on the same file, two other True 
Bills against the same Thomas Shoones, for horse-stealing at Har- 
mondesworth on 12 August 1 6 Eliz., and at Cowley in the same 
county on 8 Sept. i6 Elizabeth. Putting himself ' Guilty' to all three 
indictments, Thomas Shoones was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
4 Oct., i6 Eliz. 

I July, i6 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard Ran- 
dolph esq. J. P., of Robert Hodgson of Wynchester co. Southampton 
inneholder, in the sum of two hundred marks, and of George Reig- 
noldes of the parish of St. Brigitt in Farrington-ward without-London 
cutler and John Parkehowse of the parish of St. Andrew in Holbern 
gyrdler, in the sum of one hundred marks each ; for the said Robert's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., " because " says a 
memorandum at the foot of the bond " he is hadd in suspeccion for 
robbinge Thearle of Kent his howse in Barbican." — Also on the 
same parchment, the recognizance, in the sum of two hundred 
marks, whereby on the same day Giles Blofeylde of Barnardes 
Inne gentleman bound himself to prosecute the cause aforesaid 
against the said Robert Hodgson at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 
4 Oct., 1 6 Eliz. 

27 July, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at the 
Queen's chase called Enfielde Chase co. Midd., Henry Lawrence of 
Hadley co. Midd. yoman broke into the said chase, hunted the wild 
animals there, and killed "unam damam vocat' a prickett." G. D., 
.... Eliz. 

29 July, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highgate co. Midd. on 
the said day, Francis Jackson and Robert Gillingham, both late of 
London yomen, stole a calf worth six shiUings, of the goods and chattels 
of Rose Howson. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' both thieves were 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 16 Eliz. 

4 August, 16 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Southcot, one of the Justices for Pleas before the Queen, of Lancelot 
Bostock one of the Queen's gentlemen-pensioners and Morgan Farde, 
of Westminster butcher, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of 
Thomas Clarke of the parish of St. Margaret in Westminster grocer 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 89 

in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said Thomas Clarke's appearance 
at the next General Sessions of the Peace. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 
16 Eliz. 

24 September, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington on the 
night of the said day, John Brooke late of London laborer broke 
burglariously into the house of Richard Smythe, and stole therefrom 
" unum par' tibialium de panno laneo coloris nigri, Anglice vocat' A 
Payre of black netherstockes " worth twelve pence, a pair of shoes 
worth eight pence, and three shillings in numbered money. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' John Brooke was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
4 Oct., 16 Eliz. 

26 September, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at le Stronde co. 
Midd. and in other parts of the same county, William Hewett, Thomas 
Maynerd and Peter Stevens, being over fourteen years of age and 
strong and fit for labour were masterless vagrants, without any lawful 
means of subsistence. It was ordered that each of the same vagrants 
should be whipt severely and branded on the right ear. G. D. R., 
4 Oct., 16 Eliz. 

3 October, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of Stebun- 
heth CO. Midd. on the said day, William Fyppes {sic) gardener and 
William Reynolds laborer, both late of London, stole a gray gelding 
worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Andrew Butcher. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Phyppes {sic in the memorandum at 
the foot of the bill) was sentenced to be hung ; William Reynolds was 
at large. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 17 Eliz. 

23 October, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Heston in a certain 
place called Honesloweheathe co. Midd. on the said day, John Seynt- 
lyger alias Sellenger, John Carrowe and William Hutton, all of London 
gentlemen, assaulted on the highway, and beat and wounded Thomas 
Phillpott esq., and robbed him of a gold chain worth one hundred 
marks. William Hutton put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to 
be hung ; John Seyntlyger and John Carrowe were '• extra prisonam," 
■ — not in custody. G. D., .... Eliz. 

5 November, 16 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
James Forman late of Whitechappell co. Midd. yoman. Chief Con- 
stable of the Hundred of Ossulston of the said county, devising and 
intending to violate the concord and love between William Daye of 
Whitechappell blacksmith and his wife Mary Daye, impudently and 
impiously pursued the said Mary and had carnal knowledge of her, 
so that the said William means to repudiate her. — G. D. R., June, 17 
Eliz. 

15 November, 16 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Estsmythefeilde 



90 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

CO. Midd. on the said day, John Rodes and George Arthur, both 
late of London yomen, stole a piece of coined gold called " an halfe 
soueraigne" worth ten shillings, and twenty shillings in numbered 
money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Alexander Sapcotes. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Rodes was sentenced to be hung and 
reprieved after judgment. Putting himself ' Guilty,' George Arthur 
was reprieved before judgment. And afterwards at the Gaol Delivery 
of Newgate, made 24 Oct., 17 Eliz., John Rodes asked for the 
book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 
3 Dec, 17 Eliz. 

4 December, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Higheholbourne 
on the night of the said day, John Wrighte of Lyons Inne gentleman, 
Robert Somerstall of London scryvener, William Chamberlayne of 
Seint Johns Strata co. Midd. yoman, Richard Browne of the same 
street yoman, Philip Gary and Thomas Flower, both of the parish of 
St. Giles-in-the-Fields yomen, with ten unknown disturbers of the peace, 
armed with swords, bucklers, daggers &c. assembled in warlike manner, 
between the hours of nine and ten, and broke into the house of 
William Bradley at Highholbourne, breaking and destroying the doors 
of the said house, and put the said William Bradley and all his family 
(then being in God's and the Queen's peace) in great bodily fear, and 
also assaulted, beat and wounded Thomas Tayler clerk, then being and 
resting in the said house, and maltreated him so that his life was 
despaired of. G. D., . . . . 17 Eliz. 

30 December, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, about eight a.m. 
of the said day, Thomas Browne late of Acton co. Midd. miller, and 
Giles Palmer late of London yoman, on the highway at Acton assaulted 
Robert Lockwell, then and there riding on horseback in God's and the 
Queen's peace, and robbed him of a little sword of iron and steel 
called " a Sceana " worth three shillings and four pence, and also took 
from him " unum penularium de panno laneo coloris mottley anglice 
vocat' a motley cloke-bag worth YAxd." two leather waste girdles worth 
four pence, and three shillings and three pence in counted money. 
Putting themselves severally ' Guilty,' with no chattels, Thomas Browne 
and Giles Palmer were sentenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . 
17 Eliz. 

23 February, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day 
and divers other days between the day aforesaid and the day of the 
taking of this indictment, John Chaunterell of Clerkenwell co. Midd. 
boocher, killed, dressed and sold in the season o£ Lent, twenty 
wether-sheep, six lambs and six calves, without warrant or licence 
to do so. — Similar True Bill against John Hughes of Essex boocher, 
for killing, dressing and selling at Stepney co. Midd., two wether- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 9I 

sheep, two lambs and four calves, in the season of Lent, without 
warrant or licence to do so. — Similar True Bill against Richard 
Tynger, of the parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd. for killing, 
dressjng and selling two wether-sheep and one calf, without warrant 
or licence to do so. — Similar True Bill against Richard Barnes of 
Seint Katheryne's co. Midd. boocher, for killing, dressing and sell- 
ing one wether-sheep, one calf, and one lamb in the season of Lent, 
without warrant or licence to do so. — Similar True Bill against George 
Steere of Eastesmythefeilde boocher, for killing, dressing and selling 
in the season of Lent two wether-sheep, without warrant or licence 
to do so. — Only one of all these bills of indictment against butchers, 
for breaking the law against selling flesh in Lent affords a note, indicat- 
ing the degree in which the offenders were punished for the breaches of 
rule. The True Bill against Richard Tynger, for killing and selling 
two wethers and one calf, has this note at its foot, — " fin' — xW. solut' 
Decano Westm' per Ric'm Vale generosum, vnum coronatorum." 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 17 Eliz. 

23 Februarv, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
divers other days of the season of Lent, Henry Smythe of Seint John- 
strete co. Midd. boocher, killed, dressed and sold to the Queen's lieges 
twenty wether-sheep, ten lambs and six calves. — Similar True Bill against 
Alexander Woode of Seint Johnstrete boocher, for killing, dressing and 
selling, without warrant or licence, twelve wether-sheep and ten lambs, 
in the season of Lent. — Similar True Bill against John Williams of St. 
Johnstrete co. Midd. boocher, for killing, dressing and selling, without 
warrant or licence to do so, thirty wether-sheep, thirty lambs and ten 
calves, in the season of Lent. — Similar True Bill against Richard Baker 
of St. Johns Strete boocher, for killing, dressing and selling, without 
warrant or licence to do so, twenty wether-sheep and one calf, in the 
season of Lent. — Similar True Bill against Robert Bockett of Seint 
Johnstrete co. Midd. for killing, dressing and selling, without warrant 
or licence to do so, forty wether-sheep, twenty lambs and six calves in 
the season of Lent. — Similar True Bill against Humfrey Allyn of Seint 
Johnstrete co. Midd. boocher, for killing, dressing and selling, without 
warrant or licence to do so, sixteen wether-sheep, ten lambs and four 
calves, in the season of Lent. — Similar True Bill against Thomas Bar- 
rowes of Fynnesberrie co. Midd. boocher, for killing, dressing and 
selling, without any warrant to do so, one wether-sheep. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 17 Eliz. 

23 February, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
divers other days of the season of Lent, Ralph Shelton of Saint John's 
Strete co. Midd. boocher, killed, dressed and sold at the said street 
to the Queen's lieges eighty ' ver vices,' a hundred lambs and forty 



92 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

calves, without warrant or licence to do so. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
1 7 Eliz. 

23 February, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
divers other days of the season of Lent, Thomas Hare of Seint Johns 
Strete co. Midd. killed, dressed and sold, without warrant or licence for 
doing so, to the Queen's lieges twenty wether-sheep and two calves. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 17 Eliz. 

19 March, 17 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Stebunheth co. Midd. on view of the body of John Sedwyne 
late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict 
that, between the hours of four and five p.m. of 18 March 17 
Elizabeth, at the house of Andrew Sharpe at Ratcliffe in the parish 
of Stebunheth vyntner, the said John Sedwyne and a certain James 
Hewes, of the same parish yoman, quarrelled and interchanged 
contumelious words, when they forthwith went forth to the field 
called ' Eighteen Acres ' at Stebunheth with the intention of fighting, 
each of them being armed with sword and dagger, and there fought 
one with another, each with a sword in his right hand and a dagger in 
his left hand ; and that in the affray James Hewes gave John Sedwyne 
a wound in his right breast feloniously and voluntarily, of which the 
said John died then and there instantly ; and that the said James thus 
slew and murdered the said John. Putting himself ' Guilty ' of the 
manslaughter, but ' Not Guilty ' of the murder of the said John 
Sedwyne, James Hewes pleaded his clergy and asked for the book. 
G. D. R., 28 March, 17 Eliz. 

25 March, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Hugh Meredith of 
Wannam Grene in the parish of FuUam co. Midd. for keeping there a 
big, noxious, biting dog, given to worry and bite the Queen's subjects, 
which dog had on the day aforesaid at Wannam Grene bitten and 
injured Katherine Yonge, a girl of eleven years of age. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 17 Eliz. 

31 March, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jasper 
Fyssher esq. J.P., of Thomas Strelley of Barnards Inne gentleman and 
Francis Harward of Lyons Inne gentleman, in the sum of one hundred 
pounds each ; for the said Thomas Strelley's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace. G. S. P. R., Easter, 17 Eliz. 

12 April, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Nicholas Morris, Joan Hentley, Thomas Smyth, Rose 
Oliver and William Tucker, masterless persons above fourteen years of 
age, fit for labour, and having no lawful means of livelihood, were 
vagrants, and had been vagrants in other parts of the country. Ordered 
that they be flogged severely and burnt on the left ear. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 17 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 93 

Easter, 17 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, between certain said days 
of the Queen's 14th year, John Rowland of London sadler was the 
broker, solicitator and factor of a certain bargain between Richard 
Offley of London merchant-taylor of the one part and Sir John Sentleger 
of Annarye (? Amarye) co. Devon knt. of the other part, for a loan of 
the sum of five hundred, pounds by the said Richard OfHey for the 
space of a year, by which bargain the said Richard Offley should have 
in gain the sum of one hundred pounds, which hundred pounds the 
said Richard Offley received and had over and above the sum of five 
hundred pounds, that is over the rate of ten p. cent. p. annum, whereby 
the said John Rowland, as broker, solicitator and factor of the said 
corrupt bargain, by force of a certain Act of Parliament of 13 EUzabeth, 
incurred the pain and penalty " consiliar Attorn' vel Advocat in casu 
premunire." — Also, True Bill against Richard Offley of London 
merchant-taylor, for taking and receiving between 28 June 15 Eliz. and 
18 July next following of the aforesaid Sir John Sentleger of Annary 
CO. Devon, to his gain and profit the said one hundred pounds over 
and above the said five hundred pounds, that is beyond the rate of ten 
per cent, per annum, against the form of divers statutes in this case 
provided. G. S. P. R., Easter, 17 Eliz. 

23 May, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood esq. Recorder of London J.P., of Robert PuUyn of the 
parish of St. Giles in the Fields imbroderer, in the sum of twenty 
pounds, and of William Mason yoman and Morrys Evans barbor- 
surgion, both of the parish of St. Sepulchre, in the sum of ten pounds 
each : For the said Robert PuUyn's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery of Newgate, " in his proper person to pleade his pardon or 
yelde his bodie to thordre of the Courte." G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

26 May, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ratclyf on the said day, 
Richard Blunte, Arthur Gregory and James Cullen, all late of London 
yomen, stole twelve calivers worth six pounds, six flaskes worth two 
shillings, two flagges worth twenty shillings, and eight sheefes of arrowes 
worth eight shiUings, of the goods and chattels of William Bounde. 
G. D. R., 29 Aug., 17 Eliz. 

28 May, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewoode esq. Recorder of London and J. P., of Alice Frenche 
widow in the sum of ten pounds, and William Mason yoman and 
William Freeman brewer in the sum of five pounds each ; for the said 
Alice's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, to " pleade 
her pardon or yelde her bodie to thorder of the Courte." G. D. R., 
30 June, 17 Eliz. 

I June, 17 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Johns Strete in the parish of St. Sepulchre co. Midd. on view 



94 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

of the body of Thomas Cobbocke late of London yoman, there lying 
dead : With Verdict that the said Thomas Cobbocke was killed by a 
kick given to him " super pudenda siue secreta membra sua," in 
Owanne AUi at St. Johns Strete by one John Whynyate, who had pre- 
viously incensed Thomas Cobbocke by striking Joan wife of the said 
Thomas in his presence ; and that thus and in no other way in a sudden 
broil John Whynyate feloniously killed and slew the said Thomas Cob- 
bocke. At the ensuing Gaol Delivery of Newgate, John Whynyate put 
himself ' Guilty,' with no chattels, asked for the book, read like a clerk 
and was handed over to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

3 June, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pykthatche in . the 
Liberty of Fynnesburye co. Midd., Humfrey Toye of London 
stacyoner built certain houses arid thereby encroached on the highway, 
by sixty feet in length and four feet in breadth. G. S. P. R., Michael- 
mas, 17 Eliz. 

8 June, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harmondes worth co. 
Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Ducke of the said parish spinster, 
otherwise styled the wife of William Ducke of the said parish tailer, at 
the instigation of the devil practised by witchcraft, charms and sorceries 
upon a certain ox worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of 
Edward Brandon of Harmondesworth aforesaid, so that the same ox 
died thereof Putting herself ' Not Guilty,' Elizabeth Ducke was 
acquitted (Po se non cul Id' eat inde quiet'). G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

9 June, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill, that Thomas Maynerde, Oswald 
Thompson and John Barres (having at the Justice Hall in the Old 
Balye, on 18 March 17 Eliz., before Sir James Hawes knt. Mayor 
of London, and William Fletewood esq. J. P., been flogged severely 
and burnt " per le gristle dextre auricule " with a hot iron of a 
thumb's circuit, according to the form of the statute of 14 Eliz. 
entituled ' an Acte for the Punysshement of Vacabondes and for the 
relief of the Poor and Impotent '), being over eighteen years old, and 
fit for labour, but masterless and without any lawful means of liveli- 
hood, were again on the said day of June wandering as felonious 
vagrants at St. Gyles's-in-the-Feilde and elsewhere in the said county. 
Putting themselves 'Guilty,' without chattels, the three incorrigible 
vagrants were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 29 Aug., 17 Eliz. 

9 June, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood esq. Recorder of London, of Thomas Manley of the parish 
of St. Giles in the Fields gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds, and of 
John Hollingbrig of the same parish gentleman and Robert Homes, 
one of the yomen of the Queen's chamber, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each ; for the said Thomas Manley's appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 95 

11 June, 17 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards at the parish of St. Giles-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd., John Hollyngbryg of the said parish gentleman, a 
man of evil life and reputation, a pimp, adulterer and fornicator, kept 
a common brothel, and in the said house kept and maintained 
Elizabeth Mathewe, Jane Trays, Anne Breme and Jane Perepoynte, 
being common and notorious harlots. John Hollyngbryg gentleman 
putting himself ' Guilty,' it was decreed by the Court that he should be 
carted from Newgate to St. Giles in the next Market day. (Po se cul 
Ideo consideratum est quod vehetur in carruca a Newgate vsque Seynt 
Giles-in-campis proximo die mercati). G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

12 June, 17 Elizabeth. — P.ecognizances, taken before WilHam 
Fletewood esq. Recorder of London and J. P. for Midd., of Richard Kent 
of Islyngton inholder, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas Lilly 
inholder and Thomas Hudd baker, both of Islyngton, in the sum of 
twenty pounds : For the said Richard Kent's appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

26 June, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Thomas 
Hughes J.P., of Robert Jhones of Barmsey co. Surrey smith, in the 
sum of ten pounds : For the said Robert Jhones's appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., " then and theare to give evidence 
agenst Elizabeth Ducke for witchcrafte as well for her inditement as at 
the time of hertryall." G. D. R., 30 June, 17 Eliz. 

15 July, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Hackney 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Richard Wilson, Thomas Overberrie, 
Richard Wheeler, Roger Thompson and Robert Marrye, all late of Lon- 
don yomen, assaulted Mathew Davye, servant of William Marshall 
esq., and robbed him of five yards of blewe woollen cloth worth 
thirty-five shillings, a satten dublett worth thirty shillings, a Spanish- 
lether jerkyn, worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, a piece of woollen 
cloth of marble colour worth thirteen shillings and fourpence, " vnum 
par' braccarum vocat' a paire of gascoynes ' worth twelve shillings, a 
piece of buckeram worth ten-pence, a piece of Take (sic) worth twelve 
pence, of the goods and chattels of the said William Marshall ; and a 
marble-coloured woollen-cloth coat worth eighteen shillings, a sword 
and dagger worth sixteen shillings, a black woollen cloth cloak worth six 
shillings and eightpence, a pair of shoes worth sixteen pence, a girdle 
worth six pence, and three shillings and four pence in numbered money, 
of the goods and chattels of the said Mathew Davy. Putting them- 
selves ' Guilty,' Richard Wilson, Thomas Overberrie, Richard Wheeler 
and Roger Thompson were sentenced to be hung : Robert Marrye was 
at large. G. D. R., 29 August, 17 Eliz. 

28 July, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seint John's Street co. 



96 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Midd. and in divers other parts of the same county on the said day, 
Edward Godfry, William Bennett, Robert Daymond, Thomas Lypyatt, 
Elizabeth Braunte, Joan Harrison, Jane Robson and John Dunston 
were masterless vagrants, without any lawful means of subsistence. It 
was adjudged that each of the said vagrants should be whipt severely 
and burnt on the right ear. 

lo August, 17 Elizabeth. — True Bill that at Shorditche on the 
said day of August, Peter Smythe late of Shorditch co. Midd. assaulted 
Margaret Tisdall "et ipsam Margaretum rapuit defloravit et carna- 
liter cognovit." Putting himself 'Guilty,' without chattels, he asked 
for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. 
G. D. R., 29 Aug., 17 Eliz. 

20 August, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewoode esq. Recorder of London and J.P. for Midd., of Robert 
Bradbury of London gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John 
Holte and John Tempest, both of London gentlemen, in the sum of 
five pounds each : For the said Robert Bradbury's appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, and in the meantime for his peaceful 
bearing to all persons, and especially towards Arthur Heigham and his 
wife Maria Heigham. G. D. R., 29 August, 17 Eliz. 

15 September, 17 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Bar- 
nard Randolph esq J. P., of James Cokeson of the parish of St. 
Martin in the Fields laborer and Thorstan Harper of the parish of St. 
Margaret in Westminster in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Henry 
Allyson of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields hackneyman in the sum of 
twenty pounds : For the said Henry Allyson's appearance at the 
General Session of the Peace next after the next feast of Easter, and 
in meantime for his peaceable bearing to all persons, and especially 
towards John Barwell constable. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

26 February, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Stronde co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Bacon late of London yoman stole 
two rapiers worth twelve shillings and sixpence, a sword called " a 
three-edged swoorde " v/orth five shillings, another sword worth two 
shillings and sixpence, " et vnum alium gladium de ferro et calibe 
vocat' A Woodknyff blade " worth five shillings, and a knife worth 
sixpence, of the goods and chattels of William Sellwoode at Stronde. 
Putting himself ■' Guilty,' Thomas Bacon was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 4 April, 18 Eliz. 

7 March, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
divers other days, Adam Chattertori of London inholder threw dung 
on the highway of the parish of St. Pancrace at Kentishtowne. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

9 March, 18 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 97 

Randolph esq. J.P., of Thomas Gregorie of the parish of Box co. 
Wilts, fremason, in the sum of forty pounds, and of George Prise 
gentleman and William Hayes yoman, both of the parish of St. 
Katherine, near the Tower of London, in the sum of twenty pounds 
each : For the said Thomas Gregorie's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery for Midd., he being " suspected to be privie to the robrye of 
Albane Stepneth of Pembrokeshire esquyer." G. D. R., 4 April, 18 Eliz. 

20 March, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Ruyslippe co. Midd., Arthur Reynoldes husbandman, Robert Batte 
yoman, Edward Bennett yoman, Richard Gadberrie husbandman, 
John Murdoxe husbandman, all of Ruyslippe aforesaid, Thomas Darcye 
of Woxbridge yoman, and William Davye taylor, Roger Okeley yoman, 
Thomas Harker husbandman, Thomas Kerton harnismaker, Gybbens 
Alkyns husbandman, William Rayner husbandman, and Richard 
Parsonne husbandman, all seven of Woxbridge aforesaid, with unknown 
malefactors to the number of a hundred, assembled themselves unlaw- 
fully and played a certain unlawful game, called footeball, by reason of 
which unlawful game there rose amongst them a great affray, likely to 
result in homicides and serious accidents. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

26 March, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and 
divers other days, John Varneham of Westminster co. Midd. gardener 
enclosed a piece of the highway, near the place called Pettie Fraunce 
in Tuttell street in the said city. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

29 March, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, William Fann late of London yoman stole a black woollen- 
cloth gown called " an olde scollers gowne," worth eleven pence, of 
the goods and chattels of John Maister at Westminster. Putting him- 
self ' Guilty,' William Fann was sentenced to be whipt in Brydewell 
(Po se cul ca null' et cons est qd. fiagelletur in Brydewell). G. D. R., 
4 April, 18 Eliz. 

I April, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pyckthatche in the 
liberty of Fynnesbury co. Midd., the highway is foul and ' lutosa,' by 
reason of the rain-water falling from certain houses built by Humfrey 
Toye of London stacioner, which water cannot flow away, for want of 
the watercourse, which the said Humfrey ought to make by reason of 
his tenure of the said houses. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

3 April, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, Humfrey 
Toye of London stacioner, built certain houses at Pykthatche within 
the liberty of Fynnesbury co. Midd., and thereby encroached on the 
highway, by thirty yards in length and one foot and half-a-foot in 
breadth. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 Eliz. 

3 April, 18 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt., lieutenant of the Tower of London and J. P., of John 

h 



98 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Hall yoman and William Ward yoman, both of the parish of St. 
Katherine, in the sum of five pounds each, and of Bartram Bewicke of 
Newcasell navigator, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Bartram 
Bewicke's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, and in 
the mean time for his peaceful bearing to all people, and more especially 
towards John Valentine. G. S. P. R., Easter, i8 Eliz. 

25 April, 18 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Clement's-Danes without the barrs of the New Temple co. Midd., 
on view of the body of Francis Turner late of the said parish yoman, 
there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 24th instant, the said 
Francis Turner and a certain John Williams alias Williamson late of 
London yoman, and a certain Marmaduke Glover late of London 
gentleman, were together at the dwelling-house of Thomas Wryght 
within the said parish, when divers insulting words were exchanged 
between Francis Turner and John Williams, whereupon Francis 
Turner rose from table, and went out of the said house into the open 
space near Lyons Inne in the same parish, whither he was speedily 
followed by John Williams and Marmaduke Glover, who accompanied 
him to St. Clement's Feildes in the same parish, where John Williams 
and Francis Turner fought together : And that in the affray so fought 
John Williams slew and murdered Francis Turner, by giving him with 
a sword a mortal blow on his left arm, of which he died within half-an- 
hour : And That Marmaduke Glover abetted, aided and encouraged 
the said John Williams to commit the same murder. On his arraign- 
ment, putting himself ' Not Guilty ' of murder, but ' Guilty ' of man- 
slaughter, John Williams asked for the book, read like a clerk, and 
was delivered according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 
18 Eliz. 

4 Mav, 18 Elizabeth. —Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J. P., of Geoffrey Penington of Wygom co. Lancaster 
gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of George Leight of the 
parish of St. Foster, London, gouldsmythe, and Robert Shawe of the 
parish of St. Gregory in London marchent-taylour, in the sura of ten 
pounds each ; For the said Geoffrey Pennington's appearance at the 
next General Session of the Peace to be held for the co. of Midd. 
after the feast of next Michaelmas, and in the mean time for his 
peaceful bearing towards all people, and more especially towards Henry 
Fryerson. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 18 Eliz. 

6 May, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Osterley in the parish of 
Heston co. Midd. on the said day about ten p.m., Joan Eyer wife of 
Nicholas Eyer of Heston aforesaid husbandman, and Mary Harrys 
of the same parish spinster, broke into a certain park, enclosed with 
pales and posts for the preservation of deer and other animals of Sir 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 99 

Thomas Gresham knt. (the said Queen Elizabeth with divers great and 
honourable persons of her Privy Council, and many other exalted men 
and servants of the same Queen, in attendance there on the same Lady 
the Queen, being then in the mansion-house of the same Sir Thomas 
Gresham knt., called Osterley Parke House within the said park in 
Heston) and " cum vangis, ligonibus, fustibus et securibus " tore up 
and threw down four rods (rodas) of the posts and pales of the same 
Thomas Gresham, which posts and pales, so torn up and thrown down, 
the said Joan and Mary on 7 May 18 Eliz., about the second and 
third hours of the morning (in Aurora ante meridiem ejusdem diei), 
maliciously, diabolically and wickedly burnt and consumed with fire, 
to the very great disquiet and disturbance of the said Lady the Queen, 
and of the magnates and honourable men, and the exalted men and 
servants of the same Queen. — ^Also, on the same file, another True 
Bill touching the same affair and setting forth that Joan Eyer of 
Heston co. Midd., Mary Harrys spinster, Isotta Bull spinster, Lucy 
Saunders spynster, Margaret Wynge wife of Henry Wynge laborer, 
Margery Hughes wife of Nicholas Hughes laborer, Joan Bull widow, 
all being of Heston aforesaid with unknown disturbers of the Peace, 
to the number of twenty persons, at the command and instigation of 
George Lenton taylor and Nicholas Hewes husbandman, both of 
Heston aforesaid, on the 7th day of May 18 Elizabeth, with staves, two- 
pronged forks, spades and axes at Osterley Park (the said Queen being 
then there at Osterley House, with divers of the magnates and 
honourable men of Her Privy Council), "quoddam fossatum ejusdem 

Thome Gresham militis et per ipsum antea factum 

foderunt, everterunt et plane jacere fecerunt et cansaverunt ad grave 
(? damnum) et prejudicium ipsius Thome Gresham militis." — Appear- 
ing in one of the lightest of the fragmentary Rolls, these two notable 
indictments come to us under circumstances causing uncertainty as to 
the date and locality of the Session at which they were taken ; but they 
were probably taken at the Session of the Peace held at Fynnesburye 
CO. Midd. on 18 June 18 Eliz. before John Southcott (Justic' dne 
Regine ad placita coram ipsa tenenda). Sir Owen Hopton knt., William 
Fletewood esq. and Recorder of London, Jasper Fyssher, Barnard 
Randolph and Thomas Bygate esquires. Justices of the Peace, and 
adjourned " vsque xix diem dicti mensis Junii apud le Castell in Seint 
Johns Strete in com. p'd'co', ad quos diem et locum Juratores predict! 
exact' venerunt coram prefato Jaspero Fyssher, Bamardo Randolph, 
Toraa Bygate et Georgio . . . ." S. P. R., . . . ., 18 Eliz. 
7 May, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at Milende 
CO. Midd., Thomas Leman and Henry Whyteakers, stole and carried off 
twelve sheep, worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of William 

H 2 



100 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Hamon. Of each prisoner it is recorded, " Po se cul ca null' petit 
librum legit ut clericus et deliberatur juxta formam statuti &'c." 
G. D. R., 19 June, 18 Eliz. 

17 May, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hendon co. Midd. on 
the said day, Robert Androwes late of London laborer, stole a purse 
worth a half-penny, and six shillings and four pence being in the same 
purse, of the goods, chattels and moneys of Robert Bonyon. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Robert Androwes was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 19 June, 18 Ehz. 

23 May, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Awsterley co. Midd. on 
the said day, Andrew Robynson late of London yoman stole a parcel- 
gilt silver dish, worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of Robert, 
Earl of Leicester, Putting himself ' Guilty,' Andrew Robynson asked 
for the book, read it like a clerk, and was delivered according to the 
form of the statute &c. G. D. R., 19 June, 18 Ehz. 

24 May, 18 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jasper 
Fyssher, esq. J. P., of Francis Thorresby of London gentleman, and 
Sampson Lenard of Senock co. Kent gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each ; For the appearance of Dorothy Parkyns, wife of Henry 
Parkyns of London gentleman, at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 
19 June, 18 Eliz. 

15 June, 18 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J. P., of Tymothy Pendry of the parish of St. Martin- 
in-the-Fields writer (scriptor) in the sum of twenty pounds, and of 
Walter Weekes of Westminster gentleman and Edward Brand of the 
parish of St. Andrew in Holborne draper, in the sum of ten pounds 
each ; For the said Tymothy Pendrey's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace, " Bycause he was taken yesternight at 1 2 of the 
clocke by the constable of St. Martins in the Fildes and others of 
the watch then w"* y" said constable : the said constable demanding 
of him certen questions as to his office doth apperteyne, he did bid 
him kisse his taile. As Poule Oblyns and Thomas .... did 
testifie being then in the watche." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 18 Eliz. 

17 June, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Robert Salterbey and John Partryge, both late of London 
yomen, stole " sex libras croci vocat' safferon " worth six pounds and 
twelve shillings, of the goods and chattels of Basil Tubervile of Lon- 
don grocer. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Robert Salterbey was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R., 19 June, 18 Eliz. 

— June, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that [due notice having been 
given publicly in the parish church of Fulham, on the Lord's Day next 
after the feast of Easter, that six certain days, viz. the 18th, 19th, 20th, 
2ist, 22nd, and 23rd days of June in the said year, were appointed for 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. lOI 

mending and repairing the highways of Fulham] John Johnson of 
London gentleman, having in his occupation one hundred and twenty 
acres of land, being A Plougheland and more, neither found nor sent 
any wain or cart, fitted according to the custom of the country with 
oxen, horses or other cattle, two fit men, and fit necessaries for carting 
things for this purpose, either for the said six days or for any one of 
them. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i8 Eliz. 

22 June, i8 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood, Recorder of London J.P., of Richard Nicholson of London 
carpenter, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Nicolson tyler 
and Thomas Hayward clothworker, both of London, in the sum of ten 
pounds each; For the said Richard Nicholson's appearance at the 
nexte " Gaole Delivery of Newgate to be holden at the Sessions Hall 
in the Olde Bayly in the subberbs of London, for the said Citie and the 
Countye of Midd.", there in his proper person to " pleade his pardone 
or yelde his bodye to the order of the Courte." 

22 July, i8 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Thomas 
Hughes esq., J.P., of Thomas Smith one of the Queen's guard (unus 
de le garde diet' dne Regine) and William Welles of Woxbridge co. 
Midd., in the sum of five pounds each, and of Thomas Woldar horse- 
corser in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Thomas Woldar's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, and in the mean 
time for his peaceful bearing towards Thomas Hawle horscorser. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i8 Eliz. 

26 July, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, whereas Joan Wjmstone, 
Elizabeth Hopkyns and Margaret Archer on the 6th of February last 
past, were convicted of vagrancy and sentenced to be whipt and burnt 
on the gristle of the right ear with a hot iron of a thumb's circuit, the 
same Joan, Elizabeth and Margaret, being each of them over eighteen 
years of age, on the aforesaid 26th of July were vagrants at Clarken- 
well CO. Midd. and other places of the same county. Joan Wynstone 
and Margaret Archer put themselves ' Guilty,' but Elizabeth Hopkins 
put herself ' Not Guiliy ' and did not retract. At the foot of the bill 
a memorandum that Margaret Archer was committed to the service and 
custody of John Luck of Wickeham co. Bucks, yoman, for the space of 
two years, the said John being bound in his own recognizance in the 
sum of ten pounds to produce the same Margaret at Session of the 
Peace on the expiration of the said term, or else to produce sufficient 
proof of her death. Followed by another Memorandum in these 
remarkable words, " Ft eciam venit Thomas Wynstone de Clarkenwell 
in com. Midd. laborer et retinuit in servicio suo Johannam Winstone 
vxorem ejus pro duobus annis integris proxime sequentibus et recog- 
novit se debere domine Regne x li. legalis monete Anglie sub consimili 



102 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

condicione."=And Thomas Wynstone of Clarkenwell labourer came 
and retained in his service Joan Winstone his wife for the two entire 
years next following, and acknowledged that he owed the Queen ten 
pounds of the lawful money of England under the like condition. 
G. D. R., 2 Aug., i8 Eliz. 

I September, i8 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J.P., of Edward Benet of Rislippe co. Midd. serving- 
man, in the sum of one hundred marks, and of Edmund Smith gentle- 
man and John Thomas gentleman, both of the aforesaid parish, in the 
sum of forty pounds each ; For the said Edward Benet's appearance 
at the next General Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his 
good conduct towaids all people. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i8 Eliz. 

r September, i 8 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J.P., of Edmund Smith of Rislippe co. Midd. gentle- 
man in the sum of one hundred marks, and of John Thomas gentle- 
man and William Kyrton yoman, both of the aforesaid parish, in the 
sum of forty pounds each ; For the said Edmund Smith's appearance 
at the next General Session of the Peace, and in the meantime for 
his good conduct towards all people. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, i8 
Eliz. 

4 September, i8 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day " in regia via ibidem vocat' the Stone Bridge," William 
Jones and Edmund Barney assaulted Robert Lucas and Robert Morris, 
servants of Robert Hopton esq., Mashal of the Queen's Household, 
and beat and wounded them so that their lives were despaired, and 
robbed them of a woollen-cloth cloak " coloris sheepes coler " worth, 
four pounds, of the goods and chattels of Robert Hopton esq., then in 
the keeping of Robert Morris, and a woollen-cloth cloak " coloris 
Turkey coler " and " layed on with lace " worth forty shillings, and two 
swords, worth respectively twelve shillings and twenty shillings. Both 
highwaymen confessed the indictment, and were sentenced to be hung. 
G.D. R., IS March, 19 Eliz. 

26 September, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards, Rowland Fyssherof Fulham co.Midd. 
baker sold divers loaves called " penny whyteloves and penny Wheaten 
loves," each of them wanting assay to the quantity of eight ounces. — 
Also, similar True Bill against Roger Dove of Brayneford co. Midd. 
for selling loaves called penny whiteloves and penny wheaten loves 
at Brayneford, each of them being under assay to the quantity of two 
ounces. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 18 Eliz. 

3 October, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, having on the and of 
Aug. 18 Eliz., been dpalt with as a rogue and vagrant in accordance 
with the statute of 14 Elizabeth, and been committed into service to 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 103 

John Luck of Wickham co. Bucks, yoman, Margaret Archer withdrew 
herself from his government without his permission ; and also that 
Joan Winston had in like manner on the same 3rd of October de- 
serted the service of Thomas Wynston of Clarkenwell co. Midd. 
laborer, to whose keepiiig and custody she had been committed on the 
same aforementioned 2nd of August. Putting themselves 'Guilty' 
both women pleaded pregnancy. Found pregnant by a jury of matrons 
Margaret Archer was remanded. Found ' Not Pregnant ' by the same 
jury of matrons, Joan Wynston was forthwith sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 30 Aug., 19 Eliz.. 

25 October, 18 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Bernard 
Randolph and William Wightman, esqs. and J. P., of Thomas Phillippe 
of Braynforde, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Benet tanner 
and Roger Amerye chapman, both of Braynforde aforesaid ; For the 
said Thomas Phillippe's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace, and in the mean time for his good conduct to all people, because 
"he gretlie misvsed Mr. Rich a Justice of the Peace in the shire sainge 
he was no Justice but of sturr, as he confessed, but ii or iii others 
affirmed y' he said y' he was a Justice of troble envie and wrathe and y' it 
is pitie that they live y' made him a Justice." G. S. P. R., Easter, 19 Eliz. 

I November, 18 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Laleham co. Midd. 
on the said day, Helen Beriman spinster, otherwise styled Helen wife 
of Henry Beryman of the said parish husbandman, practised witch- 
craftes, inchantements, charmes and sorceries on four calves worth 
thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Lionel Dockett at Laleham, 
so that she killed the same calves. Putting herself ' Not Guilty,' she 
was acquitted. G. S. P. R., Easter, 19 Ehz. 

29 January, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
January, Giles Percy late of London yoman, being over eighteen years 
old, took at Shoreditche and carried off a certain " cathenam auri 
vocat' a cheene ad valenciam xxv li.," of the goods' and chattels of his 
master John Tanfeilde, who had confided the said chain to the same 
Giles, to keep for his said master's use, before he (the said Giles) 
carried it off with the intention of feloniously converting it to his own 
use. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz. 

20 February, 19 Elizabeth.— ^True Bill that, at Harefeilde co. 
Midd. on the said day, Henry Fleetewoode late of London yoman 
stole a linen sheet worth sixteen pence, another linen sheet worth twelve 
pence, and another linen sheet worth twenty pence, of the goods and 
chattels of an unknown man ; and further stole two hnen sheets worth 
two shillings and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Francis 
Weethered at Harefelde. Po se cul ca null' petit librum legit vt 
clericus et deliberatur juxta formam statuti. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz. 



104 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

28 February, 19 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Thomas Barlowe, late of London yeoman, stole a gold 
ring worth thirty-six shillings, and also stole fourteen shillings in num- 
bered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Thomas Walthoe. — 
Declaring himself ' Guilty,' and being asked by the Court how he would 
acquit himself of the charge, Thomas Barlowe declined to put himself 
on a jury of the country, but would put himself wholly on God and 
Justice : whereupon it was decreed that he should go to punishment. 
G. D. R., 30 Aug., ig Eliz. 

4 March, 19 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Ralph Busbye late of London yeoman stole " novemdecim 
camisias vocaf shertes ad valenciam xix //., duodecim mappas vocat' 
handkerchers ad valenciam xxs., tresdecim pecias panni linei vocat' 
bandes and ruffes ad valenciam xxxi., tres pecias panni linei vocat' 
gorgets ad valenciam xs,." of the goods and chattels of some 
unknown man, being in the keeping of John Maunchester and his 
wife Agnes at Westminster. Po se cul ca null petit librum legit 
vt clericus et deliberatur juxta formam statuti. G. D. R., 22 April, 
19 Eliz. 

11 March, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Est Smythfeld co. 
Midd. on the said day, a certain Richard Blunt was killed by a certain 
John Tarlton alias Thorneton, fighting in his (the said John's) lawful 
self-defence, and after death was carried to a certain house belonging to 
the Queen aforesaid in the same Est Smythfeld, and called " the Queen's 
store house " : and that thereupon Robert Hodeson of London gentle- 
man, the Queen's coroner within the city of London, came to the same 
storehouse, and then and there by color of his office, but unlawfully 
and without any sufficient warrant, held and took an inquest, how and 
when the said Richard Blunt came by his death. G. D. R., 22 April, 
19 Eliz. 

12 March, 19 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken on the said day at Est Smythfeld co. Midd., on view of the body 
of Richard Blunt late of London yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, whereas John Tarlton ah'as Thorneton, late of Est Smyth- 
feld yoman, was with divers unknown persons on the nth inst. in a cer- 
tain close called Well Close in Est Smythfeld in God's and the Queen's 
peace between three and five p.m., there came to the same place 
Richard Blunt, having in his right hand " unum gladium de ferro et 
calibe Anglice a raper," worth five shillings, and in his left hand a dagger 
worth twelve pence, who with the same sword and dagger assaulted the 
said J ohn Tarlton with the intention of killing him ; upon which the 
said John withdrew from his assailant for the space of ten ells or more 
even to a certain ditch beyond which he could not retreat, by reason of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. IC5 

the multitude of persons then being there ; And That the said Richard 
with his sword and dagger drawn followed the said John, who, having 
in his right hand a sword worth six shillings and in his left hand a 
dagger worth sixpence, in his self-defence with the said sword struck 
the said Richard a blow in the left eye, giving him a mortal wound 
of which he instantly died, and so killing the said Richard in no other 
way than that of self-defence; and That John TsLtlton alias Thorneton 
neither on the said day nor now has any lands tenements or chattels be- 
sides the sword and dagger afore-valued. At the foot of the Inquisition 
this memorandum : Et cons est qd. Johes Tarlton ah'as Thorneton eat 
inde sine die virtute perdonac' dee dne Regin' eidem Joh'i' concess 
gerent dat xij die Aprilis anno regni sui xix°. G. D. R., 22 April, 
19 Eliz. 

20 March, 19 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jasper 
Fyssher esq. J.P., of William Gunter of Kynbereye co. Bark, gentleman 
and Arthur Readinge of Underleigh co. Herts, gentleman, in the sum 
of forty pounds each, and of Richard Chatterton of Carleton co. Wilts. 
gentleman, in the sum of one hundred marks ; For the said Richard 
Chatterton's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. 
G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz. 

6 April, 19 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Hugh Aprise, William Davis and Thomas Caverly, all late of 
London yomen, stole a gown of " tuffed mockadoe " worth four pounds, 
a russet-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth forty shillings, and " vnam 
tuniculam de mockadoe ad valenciam xviiij.," of the goods and 
chattels of ... . "Po se cul ca null sus'." G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz. 

14 April, 19 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Seynt Katherins co. Midd., on view of the body of a certain female 
infant, there lying dead : With Verdict that, at the dwellinghouse of 
John Gott, her master, at the said parish hat-maker, Alice Saunders 
late of the said parish, on the 12th inst. between seven and eight am., 
secretly brought forth the same infant, and forthwith slew and 
murdered it by suffocating it. On her arraignment, Alice Saunders 
put herself Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 22 April, 
19 Eliz. 

20 Mav, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Wappynge co. Midd. on 
the night of the said day, John Bootes late of London yoman (not in 
custody) broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Hamp- 
ton gentleman (the said Thomas and his family being at that time there), 
and stole therefrom '' a medley grene " woollen-cloth cloak worth forty 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Thomas : And That 
Susanna Qujney, late of London spinster, and Richard Quynney late 
of London yoroan (both being ' extra prisonem'), knowing that the 



I06 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

said John Bootes had committed the said burglary, received, aided 
and comforted him on 8 June 19 Eliz. at Charingecrosse in the 
parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. G. D. R., . . . .20 Eliz. 

9 June, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of June, 
Benjamin Dale late of London yoman, by certain false and counterfeit 
letters addressed in the name of a certain Josias Meuse to James 
Normanton of Milende, induced the said James to deliver into his 
keeping a certain gelding with a bridle and a bit, of the goods and 
chattels of the said Josias ; and that having thus " per fraudem decep- 
tionem et astutiam vocat' cosenynge " gained possession of the animal 
he fraudulently sold it for the sum of five marks. It was ordered that 
Benjamin Dale should pay a fine of forty shillings and be put in the 
Cheapside pillory " Ponetur {sic) super pillorium in Cheapeside London 
et taxatur {sic) fine ad x\s." G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz. 

17 June, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at Busshie 
Heath co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Lawrence and John Cotting- 
ham, both late of London yomen, assaulted John Longe, then and 
there in God's and the Queen's peace riding on the same high way, and 
stole from him " unam bulgam vocat' a capcase cum diversis peciis 
argenti fracti vocat' broken silver ad valenciam Vims., et certa lapida 
preciosa vocat' stones and perles ad valenciam xk., unum pilleum 
vocat' a woollen cap et unum pilleum velvett' vocat' a velvett cappe 
ad valenciam viii.f.," a leather purse worth two pence, and four shillings 
of numbered money. Confessing the indictment, Francis Lawrence was 
sentenced to be hung. Et predictus Johannes Cottingham dicit quod 
ipse de felonia predicta in nullo est culpabilis, Et quesito ab eo per 
curiam qualiter se velit inde acquietare dicit quod ipse non vult super 
aliquam juratam patrie ponere nisi solumodo in deo et seipso. Ideo 
consideratum est quod idem Johannes Cottingham eat ad penam. 
G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz. 

I July, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the said 
day, Helen Parker late of London spinster, and Joan wife of Richard 
Pound of Westminster bocher, stole a white cloak worth seven shillings, 
" unum par caligarum coloris albi anglice vocat' a paire of white knite 
hose ad valenciam duorum solidorum et quatuor denariorum," a felte 
hat worth two shillings, and a shirt worth twelve pence. Confessing 
the indictment, Helen Parker pleaded pregnancy. And afterwards at 
the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, made on 30 August in the Queen's 19th 
year, it was found by the oath of matrons that she was ' Not Pregnant': 
whereupon it was decreed that she should be hung. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 
19 Eliz. 

7 July, 19 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owyn 
Hopton and Sir George Peckham knts. and Justices &c., of Paul Whyte- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 107 

home gentleman and Thomas Russell cooke, both of the parish of St. 
Sepulchre London, in the sum of five pounds each, and of William 
Brooke of Wenlockes Barne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of ten 
pounds ; for the said William Brooke's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery for the said county. G. D. R., 2 August, 19 Eliz. 

10 July, 19 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. and J.P., of John -Jackson of Kentishtowne co. Midd. 
tanner in the sum of forty pounds, and of Jasper Hill of the said 
parish yoman, and Edward Cutte of the parish of St. Sepulchre's 
London bocher, in the sum of twenty pounds each ; For the said John 
Jackson's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, " for that he was 
accused to abuse the bodie of one Jowan Hall beinge in his 
house runynge frome her mystres in London." G. D. R., 2 August, 
19 Eliz. 

20 July, ig Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of July, 
William Brynley of Wisterton co. Chester gentleman and Richard 
Fowall of the same place gentleman, broke into the house of Robert 
Baker at Westminster, and stole therefrom a black-and-tawney coloured 
gown "of tuffed mockadowe," and " a kyrtell of black burratoe tuffed" 
worth sixteen shillings, and a woollen-cloth petticoat worth twenty 
shillings. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 19 Eliz. 

6 August, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Barlowe late of London yoman stole a leather 
purse, worth two pence, and twenty-seven shillings in numbered money, 
of the goods and chattels of John Bowen. At the foot of the bill this 
memorandum, — " Et prefatus Thomas Barlowe dicit quod ipse de 
felonia predicta in nullo est culpabilis ; Et quesito ab eo per Curiam 
qualiter se velit inde acquietare, dicit quod ipse non vult se super 
aliquam juratam patrie ponere, nisi solummodo in deo et Justicia. 
Ideo consideratum est quod Thomas eat ad penam." In brief and 
English, — Declaring himself ' Not Guilty,' Thomas Barlowe vras asked 
by the Court how he would clear himself of the charge, when he said 
he had no wish to put himself on any jury of the country, but would 
rely on God and Justice. It was therefore decreed that he should go 
to punishment. G. D. R., 30 Aug., 19 Eliz. 

23 August, ig Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, Roger 
Baker late of Islington co. Midd. yoman, over twenty years of age, the 
servant of Thomas Pagitt of the Middle Temple gentleman, had in 
his custody five pounds of the money of the aforesaid Thomas, which 
five pounds Barbara Pagitt, wife of the said Thomas and mistress of 
the said Roger, at the order of the said Thomas, gave to the said 
Roger in order that he should keep it for her husband's use ; and that 
said Roger went off with the said money, with intention of defrauding 



I08 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

his master of the money, and putting it to his own use. G. D., 
.... Eliz. 

19 September, 19 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Harrowe on the 
said day of September, William Agreenehill of Boxey, in the parish of 
Harrowe co. Midd. yoman, ingrossed and bought ten quarters of wheat, 
worth twenty shillings a-quarter, with the intention of selling the same 
against the form of a certain statute of 5 Edward VI. G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 19 Eliz. 

19 September, 19 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Harrowehille co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Fuller alias Barnatt butcher ingrossed 
and bought of divers persons one hundred sheep worth twenty pounds, 
with the intention of selling the same against the form of a certain 
statute of 5 Edward VI. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 19 Eliz. 

22 September, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Edgeware, Roger Greves late of London yoman stole " vnum ventrale 
et vnam ricam panni linei vocat' a neckercher ad valenciam y.d., de 
bonis et catallis Agnetis Dente." Putting himself 'Guilty,' Roger 
Greves was sentenced to be flogged from Newgate prison to the Cross 
of Cheape (a prisona de Newgate vsque Crucem de Cheape London). 
G. D. R., 7 Oct., 19 Eliz. 

28 September, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Tottenham co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Gorratt of London labourer stole and 
carried off a dunne gelding worth forty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Robert Chatterton at Tottenham co. Midd. G. D. R., 
.... Eliz. 

16 October, 19 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Grenewich co. Kent 
and also at Stratforde-at-Bowe co. Midd., Thomas Dove of Stratforde-at- 
Bowe inholder and Thomas White of the same place baker conspired 
to cheat and defraud Alice Carre of Grenewyche co. Kent widow of 
her goods and chattels in this manner : — That on the aforesaid day and 
at divers other times, before and afterwards, Thomas White was a suitor 
to Alice Carre for marriage, who was assured by the same suitor's con- 
federate that he (Thomas White) was a very rich man, having houses 
and tenements at Stratford-at-Bowe, whereupon at the request of the two 
conspirators she came from Grenewich to Thomas White's house, which 
house she was made by Thomas Dove to think was the property of the 
same Thomas White, though in truth he had no houses nor possessions 
in Stratforde-at-Bowe or any where else, as Thomas Dove affirmed ; and 
That by this color and pretext of making and concluding a marriage 
between her and Thomas White baker, Thomas Dove inholder on the 
1 8th of the aforesaid October took into his hands divers of the said 
Alice's goods and chattels, to wit a fetherbedd, a bolster, four pillowes 
and the same Alice's household utensils, and conveyed them to his house 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. ICQ 

in Stratford-at-Bowe, with the intention of converting them to the uses of 
himself and his confederate Thomas White ; and that the more craftily 
to cover their falseness and give it an appearance of truth the aforesaid 
Thomas Dove and Thomas White on the same i8th of October at 
Stratford-at-Bowe induced Alice Carre to sign, seal and deliver a certain 
writing of bargain and sale of the same goods and chattels to Thomas 
Dove for the sum of twenty-six shillings and eight pence (she being 
• illiterate and ignorant of the contents of the deed), under condition 
that the writing should be void and of no effect, should she repay 
before a certain day to Thomas Dove the said twenty-six shillings and 
eight pence, no part of which sum she ever received to her own use ; and 
that thus by their falsity and craft, called ' cosonynge,' the said Thomas 
Dove and Thomas White defrauded and despoiled the said Alice ot 
her goods and chattels. G. D. R., 14 Feb., 20 Eliz. 

— • October, 19 Elizabeth.^ — True Bill that, at Nortonfolgate co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Smythe late of London yoman stole and 
carried off three " oxehides dressed like buffe " worth five shillings, " a 
buckeskyn '' and " duos coreos vocatos soreskynnes " worth five shil- 
lings, a little coat and a pair of leather breeches worth ten shillings, of 
Henry Etheridge. Po se cul ca null petit librum non legit vt clericus 
sus. G. D., . . . . Eliz. 

I December, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, Edward Dorrington 
and Elizabeth Braunte, having been adjudged on 3 June 19 Eliz. to 
be flogged and burnt on the gristle of the right ear, returned to vagrancy, 
and on the aforesaid i Dec. 20 Eliz. were vagrants at Clarkenwell co. 
Midd. Both vagrants put themselves ' Guilty ' ; Edward Dorrington 
asked for the book, and reading like a clerk was delivered " secundum 
formam statuti " ; Elizabeth Braunte was committed for two years to the 
service and government of Edmund Morraunt of London gentleman, 
who bound himself in the sum of ten pounds to keep her for two years, 
and at the end of the term to produce her at G. S. P., or produce proof 
of her death. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 20 Eliz. 

I December, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington between 
ten and eleven of the night of the same day, Richard Male late of 
London yoman broke burglariously into the house of Miles Kingenien, 
and stole therefrom "unam libratam gariophilorum vocat' cloves ad 
valenciam xiis.," half a pound of saffron worth ten shillings and six 
pence, and a pound of aromatic nuts called " nuttemegges," worth ten 
shillings. Cognovit indictamentum : Sus. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 20 Eliz. 

6 December, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Adams late of Lon- 
don yoman stole seven yards of silk called "silke damask" worth 
twelve shillings a yard, and six yards of " silke grograine " worth twelve 



110 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

shillings a yard, and six pounds six shillings and eight pence in num- 
bered money ; and That, Nicholas Ashebye of St. Clement's-Danes 
baker, on the same 6th of December, took counsel with the said 
Richard, before the commission of the said felony ; and further That 
the same Nicholas on the same day received, aided, and comforted the 
said Richard after the commission of the felony, knowing him to have 
committed it. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Richard Adams asked for the 
book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of , 
the statute. To the charge of being an accessory to the felony before 
its commission, Nicholas " po se non cull nee rec." In respect to the 
charge of aiding and comforting Richard after the commission of the 
felony, it is recorded that he put himself ' Guilty,' but was exonerated 
by the principal's benefit of clergy. G. D., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

16 December, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Wenloxbarne co. 
Midd. at a place called Mount Mill, about eight p.m. of the night of 
the said day, Richard Paunsforthe, William Paunsforth and Giles Har- 
mer, late of London yomen, with seven unknown disturbers of the 
peace, refused to obey the orders of the watchers at Mount Mill afore- 
said, viz. of William Dowdall, Nicholas Bettes, George Lawrens, Hum- 
frey Price, William Scott and divers others keeping watch for the Queen 
at Wenloxbarne, and with their swords drawn threatened the said 
watchers, calling out to them, " Rascalles and drunken slaves cume and 
ye dare and we wilbe your deathes " ; and that afterwards the said- 
Richard Paunsforthe, William Paunsforthe, Giles Harmer and others 
their companions fled from the said watchers, who, together with 
Anthony Howson the; constable of Wenloxe Barne, pursued them for 
the purpose of arresting them, whereupon the same disturbers of the 
peace with swords drawn assaulted the same watchers, and so handled 
Anthony Howson that his life was despaired of, and then withdrew to 
the house of Clementes Rigges yoman. G. D. R., . . . 20 Eliz. 

17 December, 20 Elizabeth. — Recognizances of Giles Harmer of 
Islington yoman in the ■ sum of one hundred pounds, and of Robert 
Wood of Islington gentleman and Edmund Hynde of the parish of St. 
Sepulchre yoman, in the sum of fifty pounds each : for the said Giles 
Harmer's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 
23 Dec, 20 Eliz. , 

17 December, 20 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jasper 
Fyssher esq. J.P., of Walter Rawley of Islyngton co. Midd. esq., and 
Martin Eyre of London gentleman, in the sum of fifty pounds each, 
and of William Pansfurthe, servant of the aforesaid Walter Rawley, in 
the sum of one hundred pounds ; for the said William's appearance at 
the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 23 Dec, 20 Eliz. 

19 December, 20 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jasper 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. Ill 

Fisher esq. J. P., of Thomas Cobham of Goldinge Lane co. Midd. esq. 
and John Rigges of Davis {sic) Inne London gentleman, in the sum of 
forty pounds each, and of Richard Paunsford yeoman, servant to Walter 
Rawley esq. of the Court (de curia) in the sum of one hundred marks ; 
for the appearance of the said Richard at the next Session of the 
Peace co. Midd., to answer to such matters as may be objected against 
him. G. D. R., 23 Dec, 20 Eliz. 

IS January, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Kensingeton, Dorothy Pratte alias Mounes of the parish of St, Sepulchre 
widow, Laurence Gybbe alias Taylor of the same parish yoman, 
Richard ap Robertes alias Robertes of Fleetlane in London yoman, 
and John Burde of St. Johns Strete co. Midd. yoman, riotously broke 
into the dwelling-house at Kensington of William Bingham, and there 
assaulted Katherine Bingham (wife of the said William), Katherine 
Lawzon, Anne Lawson and Elizabeth Pennant (servants of the same 
William) and beat, wounded and maltreated them, so that their lives 
were despaired of. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

22 January, 20 Elizabeth. — Imperfect File of a Special Session of 
Oyer and Terminer held at Westminster on 22 Jan. 20 Eliz. before 
John Bishop of London, Thomas Lord Buckhurste, Sir Christopher 
Wrey knt. Chief Justice for pleas to be held before the Queen, Robert 
Mounson one of the Justices of the Bench, Sir Owin Hopton knt., 
Gilbert Gerrard the Queen's Attorney- General esq., and William Flete- 
wood the Recorder of the City of London ; and adjourned to the 13th 
of February in the same year. Containing the following matters, — 

(a) Precept of ' Venire Facias ' to the Sheriff of Middlesex for the 
appearance in the Great Hall of Pleas at Westminster on Wednesday 
22 Jan. 20 Eliz. at eight a.m. of twenty-four good and loyal men of 
each hundred of the said county, to enquire, do, present and execute 
all things that shall then and there be enjoined on thepart of the Lady 
the Queen &c. 

{b) Panel of good and loyal men, returned by the Sheriff, in obedi- 
ence to the Precept. 

{c) Panel of Jurors between the Lady the Queen, and Thomas Met- 
ham, Margary Anderson, Elinore Brome and Elizabeth Barram viz. — 
Henry Heme, Robert Manne, John Newenham, Thomas Verey, 
Richard Donnyngton, William Evans, Andrew Holbourne, John 
Androwes, Mathew Perrie, Thomas Webbe, William Holt, and Richard 
Wikes. — 

{d) True Bill that Thomas Metham, late of St. Andrew's in Holborn 
CO. Midd. clerk, on i Oct. 19 Eliz. at the aforesaid parish of Holborn, 
voluntarily said, used and celebrated a private mass against the form of 
a certain Statute of i Eliz., and against the peace crown and dignity of 



112 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the said now Queen ; and that Margery Anderson, late of the parish 
of St. Dunstain in the West of London spinster, was present at the 
time of the celebration of the aforesaid mass at the parish of St. 
Andrew aforesaid, maintaining, strengthening and aiding the same 
Thomas Metham to celebrate the aforesaid mass, against the peace 
crown and dignity of the said Queen, and to the ill example of the said 
Queen's other lieges and subjects. On the bill these memoranda,— 

(i) That Thomas Metham confessed the indictment, but the Court 
wished to deliberate respecting delivery of judgment; (2) That Margery 
Anderson put herself 'Guilty,' but the Court wished to deliberate 
respecting delivery of judgment ; (po se cul set cur vult auisari de 
judicio' rendend') ; and (3) Et postea scilt' ad Session' hie tent' xiii""" die 
Februar' anno regni Regine Elizabeth' vicesimo coram Joh'i E'p'o Lon- 
don', Thoma d'n'o Buckhurste, Christofero Wrey milite Capitali Justic' 
d'c'e d'n'e Regine ad pl'ita coram ip'a tenend' assign', Rob'to Mounson 
vn' Justic' d'c'e d'n'e Regine de Banco, et Gilberto Gerrard armiger' 
Atturnat' d'c'e d'n'e Regine Generali Justic &c. considerat' est q'd 
p'fat Thomas Metham et Margeria Anderson h'eant penam statut &c." 
=And afterwards at the Session held here on 13 Feb. 20 Eliz. before 
John Bishop of London, Thomas Lord Buckhurste and Sir Christofer 
Wrey knt. Ch.J. &c. &c. &c. it was considered that the aforesaid 
Thomas Metham and Margery Anderson should have the penalty of 
the Statute. — 

[e) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 8th Dec. 20 Eliz., 
Elinore Brome, wife of Sir Christofer Brome late of Islington krt. re- 
ceived and accepted from her sister, a certain Lady Pawlett widow, a 
certain token called an Agnus Dei, brought into this kingdom of Eng- 
land from the See of Rome, with the intention of using the said token ; 
And That afterwards, viz. on the aforesaid 8th Dec. 20 Eliz. at Isling- 
ton aforesaid, the same Elinore Brome " vtebatur anglice dyd weare " 
the said token about her neck, against the form of the Statute &c. 
At the foot of the bill, this memorandum — " Et p'fat' Elinora Brome po 
se cul lo cons' est q'd h'eat penam Statut &c."=And the aforesaid 
Elinora Brome put herself ' Guilty ' ; Therefore it was adjudged that 
she should have the penalty of the Statute. 

(/) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 8 Dec. 20 Eliz., Eliza- 
beth Barram late of the said parish spinster received and accepted 
from a certain unknown person a certain token called an Agnus Dei, 
brought into this kingdom of England from the See of Rome, with the 
intention of wearing the same token ; And that afterwards, viz. on 8th 
Dec. 20 Eliz., the same Elizabeth Barram at Islington aforesaid " dyd 
weare " the same token about her neck. At the foot of the bill, a 
memorandum, that the said EUzabeth Barram put herself ' Guilty,' 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. II 3 

wherefore it was adjudged that she should have the penalty of the 
Statute. 

(g) True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. on i Dec. 
20 Eliz., Thomas Metham, late of the said parish, clerk, voluntarily 
said, used and celebrated a private mass, against the form of the 
Statute &c., and against the peace crown and dignity of the said 
Queen. 

(A) True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on 14 Sept. 19 EUz., a 
certain unknown man, being a clerk, voluntarily said, used and celebrated 
a private mass, against the form of the Statute &c., and against the 
said Queen's peace, crown and dignity ; And That Eleanore Brome, wife 
of Sir Christofer Brome late of Islingeton aforesaid knt., was present at 
the time of the celebration of the said mass, maintaining, strengthening 
and aiding the said unknown man to celebrate the same. — On 
the bill, an endorsement that the Inquest was taken, at Westminster on 
22 Jan. 20 Eliz., before Thomas Lord Buckhurste, Sir Owin Hopton 
knt.. Sir Lionel Duckettknt., and William Fletewood esq. and Recorder 
of London, by the oath of fifteen jurors, whose names appear in 
th& endorsement. S. S. O. T., 22 Jan. and 13 Feb., 20 EHz. 

23 February, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell on 
the said day F'rancis Skynner late of Whitechappell smith, assaulted 
Joan Smithe, an infant of the age of ten years, " et ipsam Johannam 
tunc et ibidem .... rapuit, defloravit et carnaliter cognovit." 
Et predictus Franciscus Skynner po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 
. . . . 20 Eliz. 

26 March, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Greisinne co. Midd. 
on the night of the said day, John Parnycote of London yoman broke 
burglariously into the chamber of Thomas Mountenay in Greisinne, 
and stole therefrom a black satten doublet worth six shillings, a black 
silk (taffita) doublet worth five shillings, and " unum par braccarum de 
panno laneo coloris nigri vocat' rashe ad valenciam vij," of the goods 
and chattels of Thomas Mountenay. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

31 March, 20 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J.P., of John Bellman of St. John Streat co. Midd. 
showmaker in the sum of ten pounds, and of George Sewarde taylor 
and John Browne smythe, both of the said street, in the sum of five 
pounds each ; For the appearance of the said John Bellman at the 
next General Session of the Peace, " for that he hathe lodged lewde 
persons in his house, and also iii or iiii lewde wemenn delyvered of 
chylde in his howse, and vppon search made by Grymes and Johnes, 
hedborowes, ther was found in his house thes persons, videlicet Agnes 
Jenkins, Richard Taylor and Thomas Bould, as Mr. Gierke of the 
Peace knoweth."— Memorandum at foot of the bill, "Venit et 

I 



114 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

consideratum est that he must be carted." G. S. P. R., Easter, 
20 Eliz. 

4 April, 20 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J.P., of Christopher Stockdale of the parish of Strand 
CO. kidd. carpenter, and William Awdridge in the parish of St. Stephen 
in the ward of Colman streat merchaunt-tayler, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of Hugh Stockdale in the said parish of Strand gunpouder- 
maker : for the appearance of the said Hugh at the next Gaol Delivery, 
" for that he is suspected to haue stollen about a hundrythe weight and 
a half of gunpowder from Samuell Thomas gunner, but hee sayeth that 
he bought about iii pt. of a hundreth of gunpowder at iii several 
tymes of Thomas Cooke and Thomas Bankes apprentices to the said 
Samuell Thomas gunner." G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

15 May, 20 Elizabeth. — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Heston 
CO. Midd. on view of the body of Harmond Johnson, late of Heston 
aforesaid yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the night of 
the 13th instant, between the hours of nine and ten, the said Harmond 
J ohnson and a certain Robert Cooke also of Heston yoman were together 
in the stable of the house of Sir Thomas Gresham knt. called Asterley 
in the parish of Heston, and railed at one another with abusive speech, 
when Harmond Johnson with his right hand struck Robert Cooke onthe 
face : Whereupon Robert Cooke with a meat-knyffe dealt Harmond 
Johnson in his right breast a mortal blow, of which he died in the 
course of the next hour and half. At the subsequent Gaol Delivery, 
Robert Cooke put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, read it like a 
clerk, and was delivered "juxta formam statuti." G. D. R., .... 
20 Eliz. 

18 May, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Wilsdon co. Midd. on 
the said day, Oliver Powell late of London yoman stole a fustian 
doublet worth sixteen shillings, a pair of canvas breeches worth five 
shillings, a pair of woollen-cloth breeches ("coloris stamen") worth 
thirteen shillings, a petticote worth twenty pence, " tres decem pecias 
auri cuniati vocat' Angelles ad valenciam vili. x^., vndecem pecias 
auri vocat' soueraignes ad valenciam v li. x^." and twenty pounds in 
numbered money. Po se cul ca null' : Sus. G. D. R., . . . . 
20 Eliz. 

10 June, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, Morgan Jones 
broke into the mansion-house of Nicholas Maddox in the parish of St. 
Clement Danes without the bar of the New Temple, London co. Midd. 
and stole therefrom " vnum librum vocat' a byble ad valenciam xxx.f." 
G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

13 June, 20 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Henry Hardewicke and Henry Harrison, both late of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 15 

London yomen stole " vnum par calligarum vocat' knytte nether stockes 
ad valenciam iiik," of the goods and chattels of Margaret Parson. 
Henry Hardewicke " po se non cul nee rec." Over Henry Harrison's 
name the memorandum "po se cul ca null rep' ante judicium." 
G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz. 

14 June, 20 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Westminster on said day of June, on view of the body of Alice Foxe, 
late of Westminster spynster, there lying dead : With Verdict that, in 
the night of the 9th instant, between eleven and twelve, the said Alice 
was in the house of Anthony Percyvall vyntener at Westminster, when 
Margaret Dorryngton alias Mason late of the same city spynster 
feloniously, diabolically and with malice aforethought assaulted the 
said Alice Foxe with a knife, with which, holding it in her right hand, 
she gave the said Alice in the left side of her breast a wound of which 
she died on the 13th inst. ; and that thus and in no other way the said 
Margaret slew and murdered the said Alice. At her trial Margaret 
put herself ' Guilty ' and pleaded pregnancy. 

19 June, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harmondes worth co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Walker alias Whitefoote, 
late of London yoman, broke burglariously into the house of William 
Duck, and stole therefrom " duodecem virgatas fibule vocat' billimant 
lace ad valenciam vs., et tres virgatas de silk freinge ad valenciam vi\s." 
Po se cul de parvo latrocinio Et jur app'ciaver' bona et catall' ad decern 
denar.' He put himself ' Guilty ' of petty larceny, and the jury appraised 
the goods and chattels at eleven pence. G. D. R., .... 
20 Eliz. 

7 August, 20 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordiche on the said 
day, Thomas Munnynges late of London yoman stole stealthily and 
secretly a silk-purse worth two pence, a piece of coined gold called an 
angel worth ten shillings, apiece of coined gold called " an half angell " 
worth five shillings, another piece of coined gold called " An IngHshe 
Crowne," and thirteen shillings and four pence in numbered money, of 
the chattels and moneys of Nicholas Mosse, from the person of the 
said Nicholas. Po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 20 Eliz. 

13 August, 20 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Lymehouse in the 
parish of Stebunheth co. Midd., Alice Harvye late of London spinster 
stole a linen coverlet worth ten pence, of the goods and chattels of 
John Donnynges. Po se cul ca null Et delib'atur solvendo feodo. 
G. D. R., 3 Sept., 20 Eliz. 

2 September, 20 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Greis Inne on the 
said day, John Hyghfeild late of London taylor broke into the house of 
Geoffrey Osberdson, and stole therefrom a pair of breeches, of black 
woollen cloth laid out with silk called sarcenett, worth thirty shillings. 



Il6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

a linen coverlet worth five shillings, and a black woollen cloak worth 
twenty shillings. Po se cul ca null petit librum legit vt clericus et 
delib'atur juxta formam statut'. G. D. R., . . . ■ 3 Sept., 
20 Eliz. 

23 March, 21 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hackney co. Midd., on view of the body of Juliana Lerede late 
of the said parish spynster, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
1 2 th instant, the said Juliana, being sick and weak in the dwelling-house 
of her master,' a certain Anthony Trywood of Hackney gentleman, died 
by Divine Visitation " de quodam morbo vocat' the plague," and in no 
other way. G. D. R., 7 October, 21 Eliz. 

26 April, 21 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood esq. J. P. and Recorder of the city of London, of Thomas 
Wattes of St. Johns Strete in Clarkenwell co. Midd. blacksmyth, in 
the sum of one hundred pounds ; For his appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery of Newgate, and in the mean time for his good conduct 
towards all people. G. D. R., 2 May, 21 Eliz. 

I May, 21 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before William 
Fletewood esq. J. P. and Recorder of the city of London, of William 
Curie of Enfield yoman, Henry Campion of London mercer, and 
Nicholas Spencer of the same city merchant-taylor, in the sum of 
fifty pounds each; For the said William Curie at the next Gaol 
Delivery of Newgate, then and there to answer to all such things as 
may be objected against him. G. D. R., 2 May, 21 Eliz. 

I May, 21 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Old Streat co. Midd. on the 
said day, Josselin Turnor, Thomas Randall, Robert Alison, Robert Pinche- 
becke and Thomas Saddleton, all of London bruers, with many unknown 
pesons, assaulted Elizabeth Burton wife of Richard Burton, and beat and 
maltreated her so that her life was despaired of. — Also, touching the 
same affair, True Bill that at Old Streat co. Midd. on the same day, 
Thomas Froste iron-monger, and the aforementioned Robert Alyson, 
Josselin Turnor, Thomas Randall, Robert Pynchebecke and Thomas 
Saddeler (sic:), all of London bruers, with many unknown disturbers of 
the peace, violently assaulted Elizabeth Burton, wife of Richard Burton, 
and Peter Blackwell, servant of the same Richard. — Also, touching 
the same affair, that on the said ist day of May the same rioters made 
violent and unlawful entry on a certain tenement in Old Streat, 
belonging to the same Richard Burton. G. D. R., 2 May, 21 Eliz. 

20 July, 21 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Elyng co. Midd. on 
the said day, Edward Smythe gentleman and James Darker yoman, 
both late of Acton, stole a dun (" doun ") mare, of the goods and 
chattels of Mary .... of Elyng. — Also, another True Bill 
against the same gentleman-horsestealer, and James Darker laborer (sic), 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. II 7 

for stealing on 15 Aug. of the same year a darke yron-greye gelding, 
and a daple-greye gelding called a " nagge," of the goods and chattels 
of William Payne esq. at Fulham. — Also, a third True Bill against the 
same two horse-stealers for stealing, on 1 7 Sept. of the same year, a geld- 
ing " blacke with a balde face and three white feet " worth five pounds, 
of the goods and chattels of William Dodington esq. at Kensington. 
Both thieves put themselves ' Guilty ' and were sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 7 Oct., 21 Eliz. 

6 August, 21 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood esq.. Recorder of the city of London, of William Nytingall 
of London yoman in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas 
Cranmer of Grystowe co. York esq. and William Fyssher of St. 
Michael's, Cornhill, London merchant-taylor, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each : For the said William Nytingall's appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery of Newgate, and in the mean time for his peaceful bear- 
ing toward the people, and more especially towards William Burdsall of 

the parish of St. Clement Danes gentleman. G. D. R 

21 Eliz. 

10 August, 21 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J. P., of George Browne of Clementes Inn co. 
Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Jaxon of 
St. Mildred's in Bredstret Ward in London citizen and pewterer, and 
Philip Wynstone of Langaron co. Heriforde gentleman, in the sum of 
ten pounds each ; For the said George Browne's appearance at the 
next General Session of the Peace for co. Midd. to be held after the 
feast of next Easter, and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing to 
all people. G. S. P. R., Easter, 22 Eliz. 

11 August, 21 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-postmortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, on view of the body 
of Robert Lenewood of London yoman, then and there lying dead : 
With Verdict that, on the loth inst. between four and five p.m., the 
said Robert Lenewood, and a certain Henry Farmor late of Westminster 
yoman and James Blinckinsopp late of the same city yoman were together 
at a house called The Quenes Head in the aforesaid parish, when 
they interchanged contumelious words ; Whereupon the three went 
out of the house into the common street near Charing Crosse, and 
the same Robert Lenewood drawing his sword advanced on Henry 
Farmor, who drew out his sword quickly ; and that forthwith the two 
with their swords, between the aforesaid hours, fought with one 
another in the common way, and in the affray Henry Farmor with his 
sword gave Robert Lenewood on the left side of his breast a mortal 
blow, of which the said Robert then and there died instantly : And 
That James Blinckinsopp with his sword drawn was then and there 



Il8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

present, abetting and encouraging the said Henry to commit the said 
felony, and in this way and no other the said Henry and James killed 
and slew the said Robert. At his trial Henry Farmer " po se cul ca 
null, petit librum legit vt clericus et del." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 21 Eliz. 

25 August, 21 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Hum- 
frey Smyth esq. J.P., of John Traherne, servant of Sir James A'Croft, 
and Richard Blower of St. Sepulchre's parish merchaunt-taylor, in the 
sum of ten pounds each, and John Middleton of Westminster taylor 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of the said John 
Middleton at the next General Session, of the Peace. G. D. R., 
. . . . 21 Ehz. 

3 September, 21 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the body of Richard Gitteys {sic) late 
of the said city, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on 31 August 
last past, between seven and eight p.m., the said Richard Gitteys and 
a certain John Gryffithe, late of Westminster yoman, were together in 
Kingestrete in Westminster, when they exchanged contumehous words, 
upon which they fought one another, at first with hands and fists, and 
made an affray, in which the aforesaid John Gryffith with a dagger of iron 
and steel, worth twelve pence, which he had in his right hand, gave 
the said Richard Gyttoyes on the right part of his head, over the eye, 
a mortal wound, of which he died on the aforesaid 3rd of September. 
At his trial John Gryffiths put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, 
read like a clerk and was delivered. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 21 EHz. 

4 September, 21 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Stebunheth co. Midd., on view of the body of Alexander 
Barnes late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict 
that the said Alexander came to his death by mischance in the Littel 
Common of the said parish, where on 23 Aug. 21 Eliz. he was present 
at the archery practice of divers archers, then and there shooting 
" longis arcubus ad communes notas vocatas lez xii skore pryckes," 
when between two and three p.m. of the said day, he was struck on 
the head by an arrow shot by John Savadge late of Stebunheth yoman, 
and received from the same arrow a wound, of which he died on . the 
3rd of the instant month. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 21 Eliz. 

8 September, 21 Elizabeth.- — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq J. P., of William Hodgeson of Waltham Crosse co. Midd. 
clerk, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Henry Wynborne of West- 
minster gentleman, and Robert Yoward of St. Clement's parish, in the 
ward of Langborne in London, citizen and clothworker, in the sum 
of twenty pounds each ; For the said William Hodgeson's appearance 
at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer all matters then and there 
objected against him. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 21 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. • II g 

17 Sefi'ember, 21 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Kensington on 
the said day, William Newnham late of London gentleman, alias 
William Claxon late of London gentleman, stole a mare worth five 
pounds and a gelding worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of 
William Doddingeton. — Also, a True Bill against the same William 
Newnham alias Claxon gentleman, for stealing at Fulham a grey 
gelding, called " a nagge," worth six pounds thirteen shillings and 
eightpence, of the goods and chattels of William Payne. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 21 Eliz. 

4 December, 22 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, William Horner of London sayler stole three cups of 
silver, called " white playne silverboles " worth nine pounds, another cup 
of silver called " a silver bole beinge imbossed and graven " worth fifty 
shillings, three " playne white salts '' worth seven pounds, and " uniim 
poculum argenti vocat' a tanckerd," and twelve silver spoons worth four 
pounds. Cognouit Indictamentum Sus. G. D. R., 18 Dec, 22 Eliz. 

22 March, 22 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harris esq. J. P., of John Leeke of St. Martin's in London letherseller, 
in the sum of ten pounds, and Edward Browne "of Roston co. Chester 
yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Edward Browne's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace to be held in 
Midd., then and there to answer to all things that may be objected 
against him, he being thus bound for " suspycion of felony." 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 22 Eliz. 

Easter, 22 Elizabeth. — Recognizance of Thomas Mathewe in the 
sum of ten pounds : Thomas Mathewe de Seint Clementes Danes in 
com. Midd. recognovit se debere dne Regine x li. qd. deinceps erun 
projiciet nee evacuabit lez close stooles in communi strat' apud St. 
Clementes Danes predict' nee in Cimiterio nee in fonte ibidem vt 
solebat. G. S. P. R., Easter, 22 Eliz. 

24 July, 22 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Goldinge lane in a place 
called Vyne Alley in St. Giles's parish, John Toolye late of London 
yoman stole divers pieces of linen cloth " called Lankeshyre clothe and 
huswyves cloathe " worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of 
Alexander Newton citizen and haberdassher. Po se cul ca null sus. 
G. D. R., 7 Oct., 22 Eliz. 

2 August, 22 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Harrowe-super-montem co. Midd., on view of the body of a certain 
male infant, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that Elizabeth 
Edlyn, late of Little Wembley co. Midd. spinster, on 19 July 22 Eliza- 
beth, between twelve and two p.m. brought forth the same living male 
infant " in quodam cubiculo " in the house of her master, John Page, in 
Wembley afoaesaid ; and that, after the birth of the said infant, Francis 



120 • MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Shoosmithe alias Soughesmithe of Wembley brewer, between eight and 
ten p.m. of the said 19th of July, being in the said "cubiculum" and 
seeing the said male infant there, carried it away secretly to a certain 
place, called the Hedegrowe in a certain field called Bogers Croftes at 
Wembly aforesaid in the parish of Harrowe-super-montem, and made 
an assault on the infant with both his hands in that place, and put it 
under the earth and buried it there, and with the earth oppressed and 
suffocated it then and there, by reason of which it died, and thus with 
malice aforethought the said Francis slew and murdered the same male 
infant. On his arraignment for the murder, Francis Shoosmithe put 
himself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 
22 EUz. 

5 September, 22 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of Stebunheth co. Midd., on view of the body of 
John Sherwell late of Stebunheth aforesaid, marrener, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that, on 28 August last past, in the highway called 
Ratclyffe Walle, the said John Sherwell and a certain John Lawrence 
of Eastsmithfeild co. Midd. marrener exchanged opprobrious words, 
and that mindful of this disagreement they went, between four and five 
a.m. on the following day (29 August) to a certain field called 
Hemynges Close near the Wyndmill at Stebunheth with the intention 
of fighting together, John Sherwell having in his right hand a sword 
and in his left hand a buckler, and John Lawrence having in both his 
hands a piked staff called "a Danske javelin," and that between the 
said hours they fought together and made an affray, in which the said 
John Lawrence with his javelin gave John Sherwell on the head a 
mortal wound, of which he died on the present 5 th day of September ; 
and that in this way John Lawrence slew and murdered John Sherwell. 
On his arraignment for the murder John Lawrence put himself ' Guilty,' 
and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 22 Eliz. 

8 September, 22 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Hounslow Heath on the said day, Robert Marrier late of London 
yoman assaulted John Washington, beat him so that his life was 
despaired of, and robbed him of twenty-one shillings of numbered 
m.oney. Po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 22 Eliz. 

16 September, 22 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Islington on the 
said day, Mary Mauncell late of Islington co. Midd. spinster stole 
" duo ventralia panni lanei coloris nigri vocat' saffegardes ad valenciam 
viii^. et duas pecias panni linei vocat' Croseclothes ad valenciam ii^." 
of the goods and chattels of Elizabeth Tomplinson. Po se cul de 
parvo latrocinio ca null et Jurati appreciavere bona et catalla ad vndecem 
denar. Et del' solvend' feod : = She put herself ' Guilty ' of petty 
larceny, had no chattels ; and the Jurors appraised the goods and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 121 

chattels at eleven pence ; and she was delivered on payment of the fee. 
G. D. R., 7 Oct., 22 Eliz. 

26 September, 22 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hendon on the 
said day, Walter Buckmore of London yoman, stole " unum annulum 
auri ad valenciam ijs., vnum par spinther de argent vocat' taches ad 
valenciam xvid.," and thirty shillings in numbered money, of the goods 
and chattels of Agnes Lingham. Po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 22 Eliz. 

4 October, 22 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement's Danes co. Midd. on the said day, John Doviat of Strand co. 
Midd. " medicus," made by force an unlawful entry into " unum cubi- 
culum ejusdem Roberti Peterson joyner," and disseized him thereof, 
and still keeps him out " de eodem cubiculo." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 
22 Eliz. 

1 December, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day in the 
highway of Holborne co. Midd., near "Davides Inne," Richard 
Conysbye of Buscombe co. Berks, gentleman assaulted, beat and 
wounded Henry Hawthorne of Hurste co. Wiltes gentleman, and drew 
blood from the same Henry. G. S. P. R., Easter, 23 Eliz. 

30 December, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J. P., of Thomas Lewes of the parish of St. Giles-with- 
out-Creppilgate carter, in the sum of twenty pounds, and John Wrighte 
of the said parish carter and John Bothe of the parish of St. Thomas 
of the Apostle " in warda vintri " London, citizen and clothworker, in 
the sum of ten pounds each ; For the said Thomas Lewes's appearance 
at the next General Session of the Peace, " for that hee with others 
heere likwise bounde did assalte and beate one Robert Stevinson att 
the Parke Corner, hee goinge whome to his house att Kingston about 
V or vi of the clocke att nighte." — Also, on the same file, and taken on 
the same day, three sets of recognizances for the appearance of Daniel 
Cowper of the parish of St. Giles-without-Crippelgate carter, John 
Nicolls of Lambeth co. Surrey waterman, and Nicholas Ball of St. 
Giles's aforesaid carter, at the next General Sessions, to answer for 
their parts in the assault on Robert Stevinson aforesaid at the " Parke 
Corner." G. S. P. R., Easter, 23 Eliz. 

2 January, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harris esq. J.P., of Barnard Poole shomaker and John Thorney 
boocher, both of Grais Inn Lane co. Midd., in the sum of five pounds 
each, and of George Pegsworth of Grais Inn Lane surgion, in the sum 
of ten pounds, for the said George's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace. Note at foot of the bill,— " For Play." 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 23 Eliz. 

10 January, 23 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Ratclyff co. Midd. 



122 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

on the said day, William Whytmore late of Stratforde Langthorne co. 
Essex, William Fayreman late of Ratclyff co. Midd., Henry Gryffyn 
late of Ratclyff aforesaid, and John Harris late of Lymehouse co. 
Midd., assaulted Walter Hedd alias Hedley, " one of the yeomen of 
the Quenes Maiesties garde," then wearing the coat or livery of the 
same Queen ; and That the said William Whytemore with an halberd 
slew and murdered the same Walter Hedd alias Hedley, giving him 
therewith on the top of his head a wound, of which he died on the 
following 13th January 23 Eliz. ; and That William Fayreman with a 
drawn sword, and Henry Gryffyn and John Harris with halberds, were 
present at the affray, and aiding and encouraging the said William 
Whytemore to commit the said murder. G. D. R,, 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

18 February, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J.R, of Robert Swift of London gentleman, in the sum 
of twenty pounds; For the said Robert Swift's appearance at "the 
next quarter Sessions att Westminster," to give evidence against Walter 
Chambers. G. S. P. R., Easter, 23 Eliz. 

9 March, 23 Elizabeth, — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smithe esq. J. P., of Lewis Floyde servant of Sir Christofer Hatton 
knt., and William Smith servant of Arthur Gorge esq. one of the 
Queen's pensioners, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Edward 
ap Thomas, servant of Anthony Myldmay esq., in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said Edward ap Thomas's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace. G. S. P. R., Easter, 23 Eliz. 

18 March, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Norwood of 
Great Stanmore co. Midd. gentleman, and an inhabitant of the said 
parish, for not going to church in the said parish, nor to any other 
church, chapel or place of Common Prayer, from 18 March 23 Eliz. to 
the I St of October then next following. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
23 Eliz. 

18 March, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that (whereas it is enacted by 
a certain statute of parliament of 23 Elizabeth, that every person over 
sixteen years of age, who should refrain from attending at church, 
chapel or some usual place of common prayer, against the tenor of a 
certain statute of the first year of her Majesty's reign For Uniformity 
of Common Prayer, and should be lawfully convicted thereof, should 
forfeit for each month, after the end of the said session of parliament, 
in which he or she should so refrain, the sum of twenty pounds of 
lawful money) Elizabeth Cordell, wife Edward Cordell of Fulham co. 
Midd. esq., and dwelling in the said parish, from the i8th March 
23 Eliz. to I St Oct. then next following refrained from attending divine 
service at the church of Fulham, and went to no other church, chapel 
or usual place of Common Prayer. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Ehz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 23 

18 March, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Anne Chapman, wife 
of William Chapman of Heesse co. Midd. yoman, otherwise styled 
Anne Chapman of Woxbridge co. Midd. spinster, dwelling at Wox- 
bridge within the parish of Hillingdon, for not going to church at 
Hillingdon, or any other church, chapel or usual place of Common 
Prayer from the i8th March 23 Eliz. to the ist of October then next 
following. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

18 March, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 18 March last past 
to the 26th of the instant June, against .... Lady Metham 
widow, Edward Palmer yoman, Martin . . . ., Robert Gryndall 
taylor, all of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields. — Also, similar True 
Bills for not going to any church, chapel or any usual place of Com- 
mon Prayer from 2otli May 23 Eliz. to the 26th of June then next 
following, against .... Strowde of Hopton co. Midd. yoman ; 
Mary Fowler of the parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd. spinster ; 
Juliana Birde wife of William Byrde gentleman, and John Reason 
yoman, of Harlington co. Midd. ; . . . . spinster (whose name is 
no longer legible on the decayed record) of Ruyslippe co. Midd. ; and 
Elizabeth Eden wife of John Eden, and Katherine Eden spinster, both 
of Ruyslippe. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

20 March, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Gabriell 
Goodman, Dean of the Collegiate Church of Westminster and J. P., of 
Henry Hyndle of Padington co. Midd. wever, Richard Johnson of 
the same parish wever, Edward Norham of Fulham co. Midd. wever, 
and Thomas Kynge of Fulham aforesaid taylor, in the sum of twenty 
pounds, each, and of Thomas Dodd yoman, James Hollydaye taylor, 
and Edward Jones taylor, all three of Westminster, in the sum of ten 
pounds each ; For the appearance of the aforesaid Henry Hyndle, 
Richard Johnson, Edward Norham and Thomas Kynge, at the next 
General Session of the Peace.— Signed, Gabriell Goodman. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 23 Eliz. 

22 March, 23 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of John Grene late 
of London, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
John Grene sickened and languished for the space of a month within 
the said gaol, and died there on the 22nd of March by Divine Visita- 
tion, of a disease called "the burnyng of the bellie." G. D. R., 

7 April, 23 Eliz. 

25 March, 23 Elizabeth.— Recognizance, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J.P., of Cutbard Wallop of St. Pulchar's parish in 
London tailour, in the sum of five pounds, "That he do gyve 
evidence and purswe the Lawe with effect against Judith Griffith 



124 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

and Katherin Hawton at the tyme of their triall." G. S. P. R., Easter, 
23 Eliz. 

13 May, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to divine service 
in the parish-church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, nor to any other 
usual place of Common Prayer, from 13th May 23 Eliz. to the ist of 
October then next following, against Francis Brygham gentleman, 
dwelHng in the said parish. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

23 May, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of James Dale of Gray's Inne gentleman, and Thomas 
Skydmore of the Inner (? Temple) gentleman, in the sum often pounds 
each, and Anthony Rone of ... . gentleman, in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said Anthony's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

26 May, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to any church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 26th May last past 
to the 26th June then next following, against Richard Craighe clerk, 
Thomas Gotham clerk, Thomas Briscoe yoman, Robert Johnson clerk, 
.... Bosgrave clerk, Christopher Tompson clerk, Ralph Sheringe 
clerk, and Henry Orton . . . ., all of the parish of the church of 
St. Peter-ad-vincula within the Tower of London co. Midd. ; with other 
persons, whose names have disappeared from the mutilated and decayed 
bill. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

26 May, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to any church, 
chapel, or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 26th May last 
past to the 27th of June then next following, against John Towneley 
gentleman, Thomas Croftes gentleman, Pollidore Morgan gentleman, 
James Braybrooke gentleman, John Byfflyte gentleman, Anthony 
Tyrrell clerk, Edward Russheton clerk, Gilbert Tytcheborne gentle- 
man, John Comber yoman, John Gyfford gentleman, Humfrey Comber- 
forde gentleman, Robert Dubdeale yoman, all of St. Margaret's parish 
in Westminster ; Magdalen Heathe wife of Thomas Heathe of Fulham 
gentleman ; and Elizabeth Johnson spinster, Edward Powell yoman, 
Lawrence Vaus clerk, John Cormorthe clerk, Richard Rosse clerk, 
Thomas Cotesraore clerk, William Feckenham alias Wyborne gentle- 
man, of the parish of St. Margaret of Westminster ; Malina Yate wife 
of John Yate of Stuffeilde co. Bark. ; William Warrine baker, Jane 
Thompson spinster, William Carter yoman, Ambrose Edmondes gentle- 
man, and John Pynshove gentleman, all of St. Margaret's parish, West- 
minster. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

31 May, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ratclyff co. Midd. 
on the said day, Robert Hewes late of London gentleman, Thomas 
Hopton late of London gentleman, and Margaret Tayler late of 
London spinster, stole and carried off a woman's gown of black 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. I2S 

grograyne trimmed with velvet, worth eight pounds, and a red 
woollen cloth petticoat worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Robert Fyts-Wylliams. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

. . . . 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on a certain day that has 
disappeared from the decayed bill, Anne Lambe spinster, Margaret 
Ashe alias Cotton spinster servant of Humfrey Goslyn, .... 
Daldersby spinster servant of John Smarte, Margaret Parsones spinster 
servant of James Gardener, and Elizabeth Burche spinster, all of the 
parish of the Stronde co. Midd., assembled riotously and assaulted 
Alice Goldewell widow, Sara Goldewell, Judeth Goldewell and Mary 

throwing them down and tearing and pulling out their hair. 

G. D. R., 28 June, 23 EHz. 

6 June, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of Richard Knight of Wanborowe co. Wilts, gentle- 
man, and Robert Knight of Balliol College (? Oxon) ; For their peace- 
ful bearing to Richard Arkell, and their appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 28 June, 23 Eliz. 

26 June, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Juliana Byrd wife of 
William Byrd of Harlington co. Midd. and John Reason of the same 
parish yoman, for not going to church in the said parish, nor to any 
other church, chapel or usual place of Common Prayer, from 26th June 
23 Eliz. last past to the ist of October then next following. G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

26 June, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Martin Trewynyarde of 
the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields gentleman, dwelling in the said 
parish, for not going to church in the said parish, nor to any church, 
chapel or usual place of Common Prayer, from 26th June 23 Eliz. to the 
ist of October then next following. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 
26 June, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Elizabeth Eden, wife of 
John Eden of Ruyslippe co. Midd. gentleman, Katherine Eden of the 
same parish spinster, and John Kytchen of the same parish gentleman 
and his wife Mary Kytchen, dwelling in said parish, for not going to 
church in the said parish, or any other usual place of Common 
Prayer, from 26th June 23 Eliz. to the ist of October then next follow- 
ing. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

26 June, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Bucke of Fulham 
CO. Midd. yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any other place 
of Common Prayer from 26th June 23 Eliz. to the ist of October then 
next following. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

27 June, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer from 27th June 23 Eliz. 
to 26th Sept. then next following, against John Towneley gentleman, 
James Braybrooke gentleman, Polidor Morgan gentleman, John Moore 



126 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

gentleman, Edward Rushton clerk, Anthony Terrell clerk, Ambrose 
Edmondes gentleman, Humfrey Cumberford gentleman, Edward 
Pooley yoman, Laurence Vaus clerk, all of Westminster ; Magdalen 
wife of Thomas Heath of Fulham co. Midd. gentleman, Jane Thomp- 
son spinster, Robert Dubdele yoman, John Cormorthe clerk, Thomas 
Cotesmore clerk, Richard Rosse clerk, William Feckenham alias 
Wyborne gentleman, and Ralph Collyer clerk, all dwelling at West- 
minster. — With memorandum at the foot of the bill that, at the Gaol 
Delivery of 20 December 24 Elizabeth, the aforesaid John Towneley, 
James Braybrooke, Polidor Morgan, John Moore, Humfrey Comber- 
ford, Edward Poole, Laurence Vaus, Jane Thompson, Robert Dub- 
deale (sic), John Cormorth, Thomas Cotesmore, William Feckenham 
alias Wyborne and Ralph Collyer, all and each acknowledged (i.e. 
confessed) the indictment ; whereupon it was adjudged that each of 
them should have the punishment of the statute. — Also, with 
memorandum that afterwards, at Gaol Delivery of 19 January 24 Eliz., 
the aforesaid Magdalen, wife of Thomas Heathe, and Richard Rosse 
confessed the indictment, when it was adjudged that each of them 
"habeat penam statuti." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 23 Eliz. 

28 July, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Jones and John Brande, late of London 
yomen, stole " unum vestimentum muliebre vocat' a woman's cassocke 
of wollen clothe color' rattes coler," worth thirty shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Henry Slatter. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 23 Eliz. 

29 July, 23 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Clerkenwell co. Midd., on view of the body of Richard Brooke late 
of Clerkenwell gentleman, then and there lying dead : With Verdict 
that, on 29 July 23 Eliz. between two and three p.m., a certain Richard 
Wilton, late of London yoman, was in the dwelling-house of Henry 
Best at St. John's Streat co. Midd. yoman, having business to do with 
. . . . of Islington carpenter ; and That the said Richard Wilton 
on the said day walking by himself went from the said house towards 
IsKngton, when he was maliciously followed by the said Richard 
Brooke to Wood, Close in the parish of Clerkenwell, lying between 
St. John's Streat and Islington, on which the same Richard Brooke 
and Richard Wilton on a sudden drew their swords, each of them 
being armed with a sword in his right hand and a dagger in his left 
hand, and made an affray, in which Richard .Wilton with his sword 
gave Richard Brooke in the fore part of his body a mortal blow, of 
which he died then and there ; and That in this way Richard Wilton 
slew Richard Brooke. On his arraignment in the Justice Hall of the 
Old Bailey, " Ricus Wilton po se cul ca null petit librum legit vt 
clericus et deliberatur." 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 12/ 

17 [? 18] August, 23 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-morten), 
taken at the parish of St. Giles-without-Criplegate London co. Midd., 
on view of the body of William Marler an infant of eight years of 
age, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that William Marler 
aforesaid and a certain Helen Smythe of St. Giles's aforesaid 
spinster in the night of 17 August 23 Eliz., viz. between the twelfth 
and fourth hours, were lying in a certain bed in the house of 
the said Helen Smythe in the said parish, when with malice afore- 
thought and the intention of murdering him she seized his neck 
with both her hands and shook and broke it, thereby killing and 
murdering the said William. At her arraignment Helen Smythe 
put herself ' Guilty ' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 
Oct., 23 Eliz. 

24 August, 23 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at the parish of St, 
Clement Danes co. Midd., Ralph Collyer of Westminster clerk cele- 
brated a mass. G. S. P. R., Piaster, 24 Eliz. 

4 September, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sowthemymes co. 
Midd. on the said day, Nicholas Wallewynn alias Poulter late of 
Shittlington co. Bedford yoman and Thomas Rolff late of Plitchin co. 
Hertford yoman, stole a grey horse worth five pounds of the goods 
and chattels of Stephen Danyell, and a brown horse worth forty-six 
shillings of the goods and chattels of Robert Woodewarde. Against 
Nicholas Wallwyn's name appears the memorandum " Po se cul ca 
null sus " ; and over Thomas Rolff's name the note " respectuatur 
per cur'." G. D. R., 6 Oct., 23 Eliz. 

13 September, 23 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Barnard Randolph esq. J. P., of Richard Baker of the parish of St. 
Giles-without-Cripplegate, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Wil- 
liam Dice of the said parish yoman and Thomas Bradforde of the parish 
of Christe Church in the ward of Farington, London, citizen and 
butcher, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the said Richard Baker's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, " for that hee killed a sheepe 
of two yeres olde for a lame (sic) and so solde it to the disayte of 
the Quenes subjectes, and for killinge and sellinge victualls on the 
sabothe dayes." G. D. R., 6 Oct., 23 Eliz. 

19 September, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer, from 19th Sep- 
tember last past to the 20th December then next following, against 
Elizabeth Eden wife of John Eden gentleman and .... spinster, 
both of Ruyslippe ; Thomas Norwoode of Great Stanmer co. Midd. 
gentleman ; Anne Chapman wife of William Chapman of Heesse co. 
Midd. gentleman ; Robert Brokesbie of Islington co. Midd. gentleman, 
Juliana Burde wife of William Burde of Harlingeton co. Midd. gentle- 



128 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

man, and John Reason of the same last-named parish yoman. G. D. R., 
19 Jan., 24 Eliz. 

20 September, 23 Elizabeth. — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Twicknam co. Midd., on view of the body of Mary Jarvys late of 
Twicknam spinster, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
18 August last past between four and five a.m., the said Mary Jarvys 
went from the house of her master, James Heron of Twicknam yoman, 
into a certain wood called Hamylandes Grove at Twicknam, whither 
came between the hours of nine and twelve on the night of the same 
day a certain John Culter, late of Twicknam laborer, who then and 
there with malice aforethought assaulted the said Mary with the inten- 
tion of murdering her, and with " a meate kniffe " gave her in the 
throat a wound, of which she languished till she died on the 19th of 
the present September, -and that in this way John Culter killed and 
murdered Mary Jarvys. " Et p'dcus Joh'es Culter po se cul ca null, 
Sus." G. D. R., 6 Oct., 23 Eliz. 

16 October, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer from i6th October 
last past to 19th November then next following, against John Townley, 

gentleman, James Braybrook . . . . , Morgan 

gentleman, Humfrey Comberford gentleman, Robert Dubdall yoman, 
Edward Poule . . . . , Laurence Vaus clerk, Ralph Collyer 
clerk, Richard Rosse clerk, .... Cotesmore clerk, John 
Cormorthe clerk, William Wiborne gendeman, all of Westminster co. 
Midd. ; Magdalen Heath wife of Thomas Heath of Fulham gentleman ; 
Jane Thompson of Westminster spinster, and Humfrey Eyton of the 
same city yoman. Bill much decayed. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 24 Eliz. 

26 October, 23 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to any 
church, chapel or other place of Common Prayer from 26th October 
last past to 1 8th January then next following, against Robert Brennynge 
of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, .... Cragge of the parish of St. 
Clement Danes gentleman, Henry Wighlie of the same parish ; 
.... Morris gentleman and Alice Newton spinster of Knightes- 
bridge within the parish of St. Margaret in Westminster ; . . . . 
Pynchyn gentleman, Susanna wife of Anthony Spencer gentleman, and 
Edward Taylor bearebrewer, all three of St. Margaret's parish in West- 
minster. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 24 Eliz. 

.... 24 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Harefeilde co. Midd. on 
some day no longer legible on the decayed bill, Edward Stafforde gentle- 
man and .... Wylson yoman, both of Harefeilde, with divers 
other dis turbers of the peace, armed with swords, bucklers, daggers 
and other arms, broke into the dwelling-house of George Ashebie esq., 
and assaulted his servants. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 24 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 29 

24 December, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to any 
church, chapel or usual place of Common Prayer, from the said day 
to 31st March then next following, against Juliana Burde wife of Wil- 
liam Burde of Harlingeton co. Midd. gentleman, John Raysonne of 
the same parish yoman, Thomas Norwoode of Great Stanmer co. Midd. 
gentleman, Elizabeth Eden wife of John Eden of Ruislippe co. Midd. 
gentleman, Robert Broxbye of Islingeton co. Midd. gentleman, Richard 
Bayarde of Islington yoman and Thomas Suutherne of Islington cook. 
G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

24 January, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. 
on the said day, Henry Ashewell alias Ashebye late of London 
butcher stole seventeen white wethers and two black ewes, worth six 
pounds, of the goods and chattels of Fulke Oneslowe esq. at Hoxton 
aforesaid. G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

5 February, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Daniel Swarthe shoe- 
maker, Francis Westbye yoman, Thomas Lambard cobler, all three 
of Holborne, and Ralph Redborne of Cowelane in London curriar, , 
on the said day broke into the house of Michael Blewenson in Turmil 
streete co. Midd., and assaulted Helen the said Michael's wife, so that 
her life was despaired of. G. S. P. R., Easter, 24 Eliz. 

6 February, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to any church, 
chapel or other place of Common Prayer from the said day to i8th 
March then next following, against Edward Yatte gentleman, John 
Whytehed yoman and William Jeneson gentleman, all three of West- 
minster. Edward Yate and John Whythead both and each acknow- 
ledged the indictment ; Wherefore it was adjudged that each of them 
should have the penalty of the statute. — Similar True Bill, for not 
going to any church, chapel or usual place of Common Prayer from 
1 8th January last past to i6th March then next following, against John 
Townley gentleman, James Braybrooke gentleman, Pollidor Morgan 
gentleman, John Moore gentleman, Humfrey Comberford gentleman, 
Robert Dubdall yoman, Humfrey Eyton gentleman, Edward PoUe 
yoman, Thomas Edwards gentleman, Ralph Collyer clerk, Laurence 
Vans clerk, all of Westminster ; and Magdalen Heathe wife of Thomas 
Heathe of Fulham co. Midd. gentleman ; and Jane Thompson spinster, 
Antony Frogmorton gentleman, John Cormorth clerk, and Richard 
Rosse clerk, all of Westminster. — On the Bill, a memorandum that John 
Towneley, James Braybrooke, Pollidor Morgan, John More {sic), Humfrey 
Cumberford, Robert Dubdall, Humfrey Eiton, Edward Polle, Thomas 
Edwardes, Ralph Collyer, Laurence Vaus, Jane Thompson, Anthony 
Frogmorton (sic), John Cormorth, Thomas Cotesmore and Richard Rosse 
all and each acknowledged the indictment. " Ideo consideratum fuit 
quod quilibet eorum habeat penam statuti." G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

K 



I30 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

2 2 February, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. 
on the said day of February, John Smythe late of London yoman 
stole a linen " Cristeninge sheete " worth twenty shillings, a piece of 
cloth worth twenty shillings, a piece of linen cloth called " a biggen," 
" et vnam manicam panni linei ad valenciam xs." of the goods and 
chattels of an unknown man. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Smythe 
asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered in accordance 
with the statute. G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

28 February, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement Danes on the said day of February, Henry Roulton of the 
said parish yoman assaulted — " et ipsara Luciam rapuit, defloravit et 
carnaliter cognovit " — Lucy Baunardcarkey, an infant of eleven years of 
age. — Po se cul ca null : Sus. G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

1 March, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Margery Wytton late of 
London spinster stole two pillowbers worth eight shillings and six- 
pence, two ells of fyne canvas worth four shillings and eight pence, 
half an ell of fine hollande worth sixteen pence, " unura mensale ad 
valenciam viiij., unum mantelium ad valenciam xxd.," with divers other 
articles, including " tria par' vinculorum vocat' frenche garters coloris 

russet et blacke ad valenciam vs unum par tibial' vocat' silke 

stockens coloris nigri ad valenciam x\vs. duas libras et 

dimid' bissi vocat' fine granado silke colorum diversorum ad valenciam 
vili. vs., of the goods and chattels &c. of Thomas Slye at St. Clement's 
Danes. — Putting herself ' Guilty,' Margery Wytton pleaded pregnancy 
and was remanded before judgment. Afterward she and her accom- 
plice in the felony (John Taylor late of London yoman, who also put 
himself ' Guilty,') were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R. , 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

I March, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Haynes 
esq. J.P., of Thomas Sleye of the parish of St. Clement Danes co. 
Midd. gentleman, Henry Tpwnsend of the same parish arrowhead 
maker, and John Cautly of Islington victualler in , in the 

sum of forty pounds ; For their appearance " att y= next Sessions of 
inquirye at Finnesburye," to give evidence against Edward Tailor (sic) 
and Margerrye Whytton. G, D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

13 March, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Richard Messure late of London yoman stole " a turkie car- 
pett" worth five shillings, two pairs of linen sheets worth twenty 
shillings, two pillowebeares worth six shillings and eightpence, another 
pair of linen sheets worth five shillings, four diaper napkins worth 
six shillings, " quinque vela serici vocat' curtyns of Cornacion taffeta 
ad valenciam vi.f.," a black hat worth two shillings, a russet-coloured 
hat worth three shillings, a rapier and a parcel-gylte dagger worth 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 131 

twenty-six shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Leeke esq. 
G. D. R., 27 April, 24 Eliz. 

16 March, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Nicholas Spenser of 
Westminster butcher, for killing, dressing and selling, without licence or 
warrant to do so, ten wethers, ten calves and ten lambs in the season of 
Lent. G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

19 March, 24 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields on the said day, Margaret Cooper late of London spinster stole 
a woman's woollen gown of " sheepes coler " worth thirty shillings, 
and divers pieces of linen cloth worth twenty shillings of the goods and 
chattels of Robert Okleson, and a red woollen petticoat of the goods 
and chattels of an unknown person, in the said Robert Okleson's 
keeping. Po se cul de parvo latrocinio : Et jurat' appreciaverunt 
bona et catalla ad sui. — Ca null deliberetur solvend' feod'. G. D. R., 
9 April, 24 Eliz. 

30 March, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hampsted co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Croftes alias Crosley late of London gentle- 
man, and Richard Bacon alias Gravett late of London yoman, stole 
and carried off a gold chain worth eighty pounds, of the goods and 
chattels of Henry, lord Clynton, then being in the custody of Robert 
Eldred, and eight shillings and sixpence in numbered money, of the 
goods and chattels of Robert Eldred at Hampsted. G. D. R., 
9 April, 24 Eliz. 

2 April, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pyckthatche in the 
parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd. Christofer Chappeman 
of Pyckthatche aforesaid yoman broke into James Hamon's dwelling- 
house (domum mansionalem), and with a stick, which he held in his 
hands, struck and beat Grace Hamon (James Hamon's wife) on her 
right arm. G. D. R., 9 April, 24 Eliz. 

7 April, 24 Elizabeth". — True Bill against Thomas Fyssher, James 
Buckhurste, John Allen, John Dacklege, Richard Shellyber, Ralph 
Burges and Oliver Wade, all of Chauncerylane co. Midd. unmarried 
taylors, for exercising the art and faculty of a taylor at Chauncerylane 
against the form of the statute of 5 Eliz. in that case provided, on 
the aforesaid day and at divers times before and afterwards. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 24 Eliz. 

25 April, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fulham co. Midd. on 
the said day, Francis Rowse smythe, Edward Brooke yoman, and James 
Buskyn yoman made a violent entry on a certain garden and orchard, 
being the freehold of William Sugden gentleman, and expelled a cer- 
tain Ralph Beadlam therefrom and disseized the said William Sugden 
of the same, and still keep them out of the said garden and orchard. 
G. D. R., 27 April, 24 EUz. 

K 2 



132 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

17 July, 24 Elizabeth.— Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at West- 
minster on view of the body of Thomas Williams, then and there lying 
dead : With Verdict that, on the night of 16 July 24 Eliz. between 
the hours eleven and twelve, Jenkinns Hewes late of Westminster 
yoman and Robert Barecloughe late of Westminster yoman were walk- 
ing in the highway called the Great Sanctuary, when there came to the 
same place Oliver Dorrington late of the same city yoman, and that 
they interchanged insulting words, Upon which Oliver Dorrington 
with a staff called a Coole Staffe, which he held in both his hands, 
advanced with the intention of wounding the same Jenkinns and 
Robert ; and That Jenkinns Hewes, having in his right hand a sword 
and in his left hand a buckler, and Robert Barecloughe, having in his 
right hand a sword and in his left hand a dagger, were fighting and 
making an affray with Oliver Dorrington, when there came the aforesaid 
Thomas Williams into the same highway who, having a rapier in his 
right hand and a buckler in his left, joined in the fray, fighting on the 
side of Oliver Dorrington against Jenkinns Hewes and Robert Bare- 
cloughe, in which affray Jenkinns Hewes with his sword gave Thomas 
Williams, on the right part of his neck, a mortal blow of which he 
instantly died. On his arraignment Jenkinns Hewes put himself 
' Not Guilty' of the felonious killing of Thomas Williams, but ' Guilty ' 
of killing him in self-defence. G. D. R., 28 Aug., 24 Eliz. 

23 July, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seynt Martyns in the Fyld 
on the said day, Thomas Holcrofte gentleman, John Gryffyn yoman, 
Thomas Harrys taylor and John Stocks chaundler, broke into the house 
of Thomas Poulteney gentleman. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 24 Eliz. 

3 August, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys esq., one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., 
of Thomas Holland of Whitecrosstreat co. Midd. silkwever, and 
Jonas Blankes in the same street silkwever, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and Henry Bettes of the same street plasterer in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said Henry Bettes's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace, to answer " for keepinge companie all 
night with a lightwoman in Turmilstreat." G. D. R., 28 Aug., 24 Eliz." 

18 August, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of John Heale of the Inner Temple gentleman and 
John Hatch of the same Temple gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds 
each : For the appearance of Nicholas Mayner of the parish of St. 
Sepulchre in London at the next General Session of the Peace, and in 
the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all people, and more 
especially towards Thomas Rainsford of the parish of St. Andrew in 
High Holborn cook. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 24 Eliz. 

19 August, 24 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 33 

said day, John Bryce alias Pryce late of Westminster yoman, " felonice 
rapuit deflorauit et carnaliter cognovit " Katherine Blenkinsoppe, an 
infant of twelve years of age. Po se cul ca null' : Sus. G. D. R., 
28 Aug., 24 Eliz. 

25 August, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Yonge esq. J. P., of John Harley of Shorditche baker, in the sum of 
twenty pounds, for his appearance " at the nexte Sessions of Inquirye or 
of the Peace " to be holden within the com. of Midd., "to geue testi- 
monye and euidence of and concerning certen rebellious and trayterous 
speaches vttered and pronounced by John Malvill, Scottishman, and 
doe not then departe without licence of the Courte." G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 24 Eliz. 

31 August, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Barnard 
Randolph esq. J.P., of Margery Androwes of the parish of Clarkenwell 
CO. Midd. widow, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Henry Stokes 
yoman and George Smythe taylor, both of the said parish, in the sum 
of twenty pounds each ; For the said Margery's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace, " for that shee is suspected to be a 
wytche and that shee hathe bewytched a man childe of Mychaell 
Blwinson (sic) of thage of three yeres olde or there aboutes, whoe is 
by reason of the sam ded as is said." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 24 Eliz. 

25 September, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer from the said day to ist 
January then next following, against Anthony Throgmorton gentleman, 
Humfrey Comberford gentleman, Edward Yate gentleman, John 
Moore gentleman, Edward Poule gentleman, all of Westminster ; 
Malina wife of ... . Heathe of Fulham ; and Jane Thompson, 
spinster, Laurence Vauxe clerk, Ralph CoUyer clerk, John Cormorthe 
clerk, Thomas Cottesmore clerk and Richard Rosse clerk, all of West- 
minster. — At the bill's foot a memorandum that on 22 January 25 Eliz. 
Humfrey Comberford, Edward Yate, John Moore, Edwarde Poule, John 
Cormorthe and Richard Rosse all and each acknowledged the indict- 
ment before the Justices for delivering the gaol of Newgate, when it was 
adjudged that each of them should have the penalty of the statute. — ■ 
Similar True Bill, for not going to church &c. from 25 September 
24 Eliz. to ist January then next following, against Juliana Burde wife 
of William Burde of Harlingeton co. Midd. gentleman, Anthony 
Briggam of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, Ralph Noble of 
Haddley co. Midd. yoman, William Hudson of the same parish 
yoman. Sir John Arrundell of Clarkenwell co. Midd. knt., and his wife 
the Lady Agnes Sturton, and John Walker of Islingeton co. Midd. 
gentleman, G. D. R., 18 Jan., 25 Eliz. 

I October, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hogge Lane co. 



134 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Midd., Henry Browne of Hogge lane in Whitechappell dug and made 
" quandam foveam vocat' a sawe-pytt " to the nuisance and injury of 
the inhabitants of and passers through the said lane. G. S. P. R- 
Michaelmas, 24 Eliz. 

2 October, 24 Elizabeth.— True Bill against John Clackwell late 
of Herefeild co. Midd. yoman, for having on the said day fraudulently 
put to his own use eight of the twenty pullettes, which, in obedience to 
a certain writ from the same John Clackwell, one of the Chief Con- 
stables within the Hundred of Elthorne co. Midd., John Rodyng and 
John Hale constables of Ruyslippe co. Midd. took, provided and 
delivered to the said Chief Constable for the Queen's use. Endorsed 
with the names of the Jurors who found the bill, George Shelley being 
one of them. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

16 October, 24 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harris esq. one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of 
Mathew Shakespeare {sic) of St. Johns Streat co. Midd. vitler and Miles 
Gelyon of the same street smith, in the sum of five pounds each, and 
of Hugh Vomer of the same street smyth, in the sum of ten pounds ; 
For the said Hugh Vomer's appearance at the next General Session 
of the Peace and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards 
all people and especially to Robert Wattes. G. D. R., 4 October, 
25 Eliz. 

6 November, 24 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edmonton co. 
Midd. on the said day, Owin Jones late of Edmonton aforesaid, clerk, 
assaulted Marcea Askewe, wife of Hugh Askewe, " et ibidem felonice 
rapuit defloravit et earn contra voluntatem suam carnaliter cognovit." 
Po senon cul nee rec. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

23 December, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Wallyn alias Sheregrynder and 
Edward Ralien, both late of London yomen, entered the house of 
John Walley gentleman and stole therefrom a violet woollen-cloth 
gown trimmed with velvet worth seven pounds, a sylke chamblett 
kyrtell worth thirty-five shillings, a white satten dublett worth twenty 
shillings, a pair of yellow Jerse netherstockyns worth forty shillings, 
a Scottishe dagger worth ten shillings, and a piece of cloth called 
' arris-hangins ' worth eight pounds. Acknowledging the indictment, 
he was sentenced to be hung. . Et postea (atG. D., 27 March, 26 Eliz.) 
po se cul ca null, asked for the book, read like a clerk and was 
delivered. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

26 December, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, between eleven and 
twelve p.m. in the night of the said day and at divers times before and 
afterwards, at the parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd., Seintlowe 
Knyston gentleman, George Peters alias Anthony gentleman, and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 135 

Maurice Shyppewarde gentleman, all three of Clement's Inne, Richard 
Lighte of Lions Inn gentleman alias Richard Lighte of Newe Inne 
gentleman alias John Phokas late of London gentleman, John Perry- 
man and Samuel Pynder of Lions Inne gentlemen, Hugh Button of 
London gentleman, Hugh Fownteyne of Lincolnes Inne gentleman, 
and John Dowle of Newe Ine gentleman, assembled themselves un- 
lawfully and riotously and with swords, daggers, stones and brickbattes 
broke, assaulted, wounded and prostrated (fregerunt, insultaverunt 
laceraverunt et prostraverunt) the houses and windows of Humfrey 
Stowe and John Boode and divers other inhabitants of the said parish : 
And further that the aforesaid gentlemen have been and are common 
disturbers of the peace and " nightewakers '' in the said parish and 
elsewhere in the county of Middlesex ; and further that on 28 
December in the year aforesaid the said Richard Lighte alias John 
Phokas entered the church of St. Clement Danes at the time of divine 
prayer and there in loud voice sung out these English words (decan- 
tavit hec Anglica verba) " Falantido Dilly " divers time, and by so doing 
disturbed John Morecrofte clerk then and therr performing the divine 
prayers. G. D. R., 18 Jan., 25 Eliz. 

2 January, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, Sentlowe 
Knyston of Clementes Inne co. Midd. gentleman, George Peters alias 
Anthony of the same Inn gentleman, Maurice Shepperd of the same 
Inn gentleman, Richard Light late of Lions Inne gentleman alias 
Richard Light of Newe Inne gentleman alias John Phokas late of 
London gentleman, John Perryman of Lions Inne gentleman, Samuel 
Pynder of Lions Inne gentlejiian, Hugh Dutton of London gentleman, 
Hugh Fowneteyne of Lincoln's Inne gentleman, and John Dowle of 
Newe Inne gentleman, with ten unknown disturbers of the peace, armed 
with swords bucklers daggers staves and forreste-billes broke into the 
dwelling-house of Thomas Morfett in the parish of St. Clement Danes, 
and there assaulted William Cooke, beating and wounding him so that 
his life was despaired of. G. D. R., 18 Jan., 25 Eliz. 

3 January, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said day to 
17th March then next following, against Anthony Throgmorton gentle- 
man, Edward Yate gentleman, John Moore gentleman, Humfrey 
Comberford gentleman, Edward Poule yoman, Thomas Edwards 
gentleman, all of Westminster ; Magdalen Heath wife of Thomas 
Heath of Fulham co. Midd. gentleman, Laurence Vause clerk, John 
Cormorthe clerk, Thomas Cottesmore clerk, Richard Rosse clerk, 
James Braybrooke gentleman and Humfrey Eyton gentleman, all of 
Westminster. — Also, similar True Bill for not going to church, chapel 
or any other usual place of Common Prayer, from ist January 25 Eliz. 



136 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

to 23 March then next following, against Sir John Arrandell of Clarken- 
well CO. Midd. knt. and his wife the Lady Agnes Sturton, and Juliana 
Burde wife of William Burde of Harlington co. Midd. gentleman. 
G. D. R., IS April, 25 Eliz. 

3 January, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clarkenwell on the 
said day George Kyrbye late of London yoman stole and carried off, 
together with other leather gloves and goods of leather "unam duode- 
nam chirothecarum corei vocat' a dozen of sweete gloves ad valenciam 
vs." Putting himself 'Guilty,' George Kyrbye asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of the 
Statute. G. D. R., 18 Jan., 25 Eliz. 

19 January, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of William Burde of Gelding Lane whitebaker and 
Richard Pittes of Southwarke cowper, in the sum of twenty pounds 
each, and of Henry Howell of London citizen and merchant-taylor in 
the sum of forty pounds ; For the said Henry Howell's appearance at 
the next General Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 4 October, 25 Eliz. 

— January, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields on a day (not legible 
on the decayed and fragmentary parchment) on view of the body of 
Oliver Androwes late of London gentleman, who came to his death 
through a broil, that ocurred between him and a certain Henry Sheppey 
on 19 January 25 EHz. between four and five p.m. near the mansion- 
house of John Coppyn in the public street of the same parish, when with 
his rapier the said Henry Sheppey gave the said Oliver Androwes on 
the fore part of his body and the left part of his belly a mortal blow, 
of which he died on the 21st instant : With Verdict of jurors that the 
said Oliver Androwes, who drew his sword only in self-defence, was 
slain .and murdered by Henry Sheppey. On his arraignment Henry 
Sheppey put himself ' Guilty ' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
15 Feb., 25 Eliz. 

I February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Robert Sutton late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict of jurors, that the 
said Robert Sutton after seven days' illness died in the gaol, on 31 Jan. 
25 Eliz. by Divine Visitation, of the pestilent disease called the plague. 
G. D. R., 15 Feb., 25 Eliz. 

I February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Ralph Blythe late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, after seven 
days' illness the said Ralph died in the gaol on 3 1 January of the said 
year by Divine Visitation, of the pestilent disease called ' the plague.' 
G. D. R., IS Feb., 2s Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 37 

I February, 25 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of thebody of William Newborne 
late of London yoman : With Verdict of jurors that, after seven days of 
illness, the said William died in the gaol on 31st January last past, by 
Divine Visitation, of the pestilent disease called 'the plague.' 
G. D. R., 15 Feb., 25 Eliz. 

I February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of William Hukens 
late of London yoman, there lying d-ead : With Verdict of jurors that, 
after seven days of illness, the said William Hukens died in the gaol 
on 31st January of the said year, by Divine Visitation, of the pestilent 
disease called 'the plague.' G. D. R., 15 Feb., 25 Eliz. 
' 2 February, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys, one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., ot 
Fermin Perrynall of Turmilstreat co. Midd. joiner and William Allyn 
of Westsmythfield gentleman in the sum of five pounds each, and of 
Sebastian Legar of St. Johns Street co. Midd. barbour-surgion ; For 
the said Sebastian Legar's appearance at the next General Session of 
the Peace. — At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that the said 
Sebastian Legar appeared, when he was adjudged to be whipt from St. 
Sepulchre's to St. John's Street, — a sentence subsequently commuted 
to a fine of twenty shillings for the use of the poor. G. D. R., 
4 Oct. 25 EHz. 

13 February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of John Dier, late of 
London yoman : With Verdict that, after two days of illness, the said 
John died in the gaol on the 1 2th instant, by Divine Visitation, of a 
certain infirmity called "the pining siknes." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 
25 Eliz. 

16 February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Isleworth co. Midd. on view of the body of John Sherman 
late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
the 13th inst., between eleven and twelve p.m., the said John Sherman 
and a cetain ■ Mathew Pryce of the aforesaid parish, quarrelled in the 
house of Edward Justice of the same parish miller, when John Sher- 
man with his fist gave Mathew Pryce a blow on his left ear, and then 
snatching up a candlestick showed a purpose of striking his adversary 
with it, whereupon the said Mathew drew his dagger, and with it gave 
the said John on the fore part of his body under the ribs a mortal 
wound, of which he died on the isth inst., and thereby the said 
Mathew feloniously slew the said John. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

20 February, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Holborn co. 
Midd. on the said day, Geoffrey Banning late of London laborer stole 



138 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

a grey gelding worth five pounds six shillings and eight pence, of the 
goods and chattels of Anthony Whiteharte. Cognovit indicamentum : 
Sus. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Ehz. 

23 February, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within the Gaol of Newgate, on view of the body of William 
Pero late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, after 
five days' illness, the said William Pero died in the gaol on the 
same day, by Divine Visitation, of a certain pestilent and pestiferous 
disease called ' the plague.' G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

28 February, 25 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Milende co. Midd. 
on the said day, Olyver Adams late of London yoman stole a bay 
gelding, worth thirteen pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir William 
FytzWilliams knt. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 EHz. 

5 March, 25 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. on 
the said day, Helen Rogers late of London spinster, stole a woman's 
gown " de durans coloris purple " worth twenty shillings, a kyrtell of 
tuffed mockadoe coloris red and blacke " worth ten shillings, " vnum 
ornamentum panni hnei vocat' a drawen-worke gorgett " worth two 
shillings, " duo ornamenta vocat net woorke gorgettes " worth twelve 
pence, a gold ring with a diamond set in it worth twenty shillings, with 
other things of the goods and chattels of Henry Campion gentleman. 
G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

5 March, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Sowthemyms co. Midd. on view of the body of Roger Ludforde 
yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict of jurors, that Nicholas Martyn 
and Richard Turvey, both late of Southmyms yomen were, on the 
3rd instant, between three and four p.m., playing with other persons at 
foote-ball in the field called Evanes Feild at Southmyms, when the said 
Roger Ludforde and a certain Simon Maltus of the said parish yoman 
came to the ground, and that Roger Ludforde cried out ' Cast hym 
over the hedge,' indicating that he meant Nicholas Martyn, who retorted 
' Come thowe and do yt ' ; That thereupon Roger Ludforde ran towards 
the ball with the intention of kicking it, whereupon seeing his purpose 
Nicholas Marten " cum cubito dextri brachii sui " and Richard Turvey 
" cum cubito sinistri brachii sui " struck John Ludford on the fore part 
of his body under the breast, giving him a mortal blow and concussion, 
of which he died within a quarter of an hour ; and that Nicholas and 
Richard in this manner feloniously slew the said John. G. D. R., 15 
April, 25 EHz. 

7 March, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Stanwell co. Midd., on view of the body of Robert Smythwick late 
of the said parish yoman : With Verdict that, on the 4th instant between 
three and four p.m. the said Robert Smythewick was in the highway at 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 39 

Rudesworthe alias Colbrockende in the said parish, together with 
Nicholas BuUman of the same parish yoman and George Brabyn 
of Colbrocke co. Bucks collermaker, when Nicholas BuUman and 
George Brabyn made an affray and fought together, the former being 
armed with a sword whilst George Brabyn fought with a cudgel ; that 
during the affray Roger Tayler late of Colbrocke in the parish of 
Horton brewer came up, having in his right hand " a Bearing Bill," 
which Nicholas BuUman seized and took from him against his will ; 
that on being thus disarmed Roger Tayler ran into a house near at 
hand, and brought therefrom " a Coole Staffe," and assailed Robert 
Smythewicke who had drawn his sword for self-preservation ; and that in 
the affray which Roger Tayler forced on Robert Smythewicke, the 
former with the " Coole Staffe " gave the said Robert on the left part 
of his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 6th inst. ; and that, 
in so causing the said Robert's death, Roger Tayler slew and murdered 
hiin. On his arraignment Roger Tayler put himself ' Not Guilty' of 
murder, but ' Guilty ' of killing in self-defence. The result does not 
appear. G. D. R., 15 April, 25 Eliz. 

12 March, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smyth esq. J. P., of Clement Rigges of Islington inholder, in the sum 
of ten pounds ; For the appearance, at the next General Session of the 
Peace, of John Phippes servant of Thomas Love of Lecester gentle- 
man. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

21 March, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Tyshere late of 
London a Frenchman, then and th^re lying dead : With Verdict of 
jurors that, after five days' iUness, the said WiUiam Tishere died on the 
said day, by Divine Visitation, of a pestUent disease called " the 
plague." G. D. R., 15 AprU, 25 EHz. 

I April, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill, for not going to church, chapel 
or any other place of Common Prayer, from the said day to 30th 
September then next foUowing, against Mary Morgan spinster, Henry 
Banister yoman, Laurence Gefford yoman, Robert Wynterborne yoman, 
Henry Ratclyff yoman, and Henry .... yoman (servant of 
Lady Gerrard), all of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields ; Juliana 
Burde wife of William Burde of Harlington co. Midd. gentleman, Philip 
Bassett of Islingeton gentleman. Sir John Arrundell of Clarkenwell co. 
Midd. knt., Erasmus Saunders of Clarkenwell gentleman, and Thomas 
Wilford of Clarkenwell gentleman. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 26 Eliz. 

10 April, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Wolley of Westminster gentleman, in the 
sum of ten pounds; whereby the said John Wolley bound himself 
to follow the indictment against John Wallyn alias Sheregrinder for 



I40 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

felony, at the next General Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 

25 Ehz. 

10 April, 25 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Charinge Crosse in the. 
parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields on the said day, Tibald Gyllyott of 
the city of London taylor, stole " eight amber buttons with stalkes and 
headdes of goulde" worth eight shillings, "three Cypers garters'' 
adorned with gold thread worth ten shillings, nine handkerchiefs worth 
nine shillings, " unam cistulam de virgis operatis cum corio " worth 
five shillings, and thirty-five pounds in numbered money, of the good 
chattels and moneys of John Stanhope esq. Tibald Gyllyott was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 26 Eliz. 

11 April, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, chapel 
or any other usual place of Common Prayer, from the said day to the 
15th May then next following, against Katherine Bellamy widow, Jerom 
Bellamy gentleman, Richard Bellamy gentleman, and .... 
Wingefeilde alias Wynter gentleman, all of Harrowe-super-montem. — 
Also True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of 
Common Prayer, from i8th May 25 Eliz. to the i8th August then next 
following, against James Braybrooke gentleman, Edward Yate gentle- 
man, .... Eyton gentleman, Humfrey Comberford gentleman, 
Edward Poule yoman, Thomas Edwardes gentleman, Laurence Vaus 
clerk, John Cormorthe clerk, and Thomas Cotesmore clerk, all of West- 
minster CO. Midd. — At the foot of this second bill, a memorandum 
that, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate of 20 January 26 Eliz. James 
Braybrooke, Edward Yate, John . . . ., Humfrey Eyton, Humfrey 
Comberford, Edward Poule, and John Cormorthe "cognoverunt et 
quilibet cognovit indicamentum predictum. Ideo consideratum fuit 
quod quilibet eorum habeat penam statuti." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
25 Eliz. 

15 April, 25 ELizABETH.^^Recognizances, taken at The Castell in 
Seint Johnstreete co. Midd., of Roger Webbe of St. Giles's-in-the- 
Fields baker, and Richard Ives of Goldingelane co. Midd. taylor, in 
the sum of ten pounds each, and of Stephen Stowell servant of the 
Lord Russell in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Stephen 
Stowell's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, to 
answer respecting suspicion of a felony. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
25 Eliz. 

28 April, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hackney, on view of the body of William Williams late of London 
gentleman, who came by his death in an affray between him and a 
certain John Rowland, both of them fighting with sword in right hand 
and buckler in left hand in the high way at the Bell at Smythfeilde on 
the 27th inst. : With Verdict of jurors that the said John Rowland 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 14I 

killed and murdered the said William Williams. Record decayed and 
fragmentary. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

30 April, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys esq., one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., 
of Ralph Bromage and Rowland Price, both servants of Sir John 
Parret knt., in the sum of five pounds each, and of James Gowlinge, 
also a servant of Sir James Parret knt., in the sum of ten pounds ; For 
the appearance of the said James Gowlinge at the next General Session 
of the Peace in Middlesex, and in the mean time for his peaceful bear- 
ing towards all people, and more especially towards Mathew Shakespere. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

4 June, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Younge esq. J. P., of Robert Grene of the parish of St. Agnes within 
Aldersgate, London, citizen and draper, and John Griffine of the parish 
of St. Giles-without-Creplegate tailor, in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of Evan Price of St. Giles's aforesaid a servingman, in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said Evan Price's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his peaceful 
conduct towards all people and especially towards Bettye Everett, the 
wife of John Everett. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

2 July, 25 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Hackney co. Midd., on view of the body of Anne Haselton late of 
. . . .: With Verdict that, on 12th of June 25 Eliz., Felicia Walden, 
late of Hackney aforesaid, widow, assaulted the said Anne Haselton 
and with a knife gave her " in posteriorem partem corporis sui videlt' 
in sinistram clunem " a mortal blow, from which she languished 
from the said 12th of June to the 30th of the same month, on 
which last-named day she died of the said blow. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 
25 Eliz. 

12 August, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of Salomon Dominicus of Turmilstreet showmaker 
and Barnaby Newman of the same street chaundler, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, for the appearance, at the next General Session of the 
Peace, of Agnes Dominica wife of Salomon Dominicus aforesaid, 
and in the mean time for her peaceful bearing towards all people, 
and especially towards Ellen Bluenson, wife of Michael Bluenson. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

27 August, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Herefeilde co. Midd. 
on the said day, Henry Brudnell late of London yoman stole " duas 
pecias auri cuniati vocat' soueraignes ad valenciam xx.r.," and four 
pieces of coined gold called Angelles worth forty shillings, and a piece 
of coined gold called a Frenche Crowne worth six shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Thomas Grenehill. Putting himself ' Guilty,' 



142 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Henry Brudnell was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 
25 Eliz. 

27 August, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordich on the 
said day, William Broughton late of London coper {sic) stole a purpell 
woollen-cloth cloak worth twenty shillings, " vn' thoracem panni lanei 
coloris nigri ad valenciam xs., vn' par subligacul' panni lanei col oris 
purpel ad valenciam vi5. wWid., vn' par tibialiu of worsted coloris 
watchshide ad valenciam \s.," together with other articles of clothing, 
and divers pieces of money, of the goods chattels and moneys of 
George Hayes. — At the foot of the bill a clerical memorandum that, at 
the Gaol Delivery of 4 Dec. 26 Eliz. William Broughton put himself 
'Guilty,' asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered 
according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

31 August, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Powell surveyor of the Queen's Ordnance in 
the Tower of London and Robert Pyne gentleman. Treasurer of Lions 
Inne, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of William Powell of 
Totnam Hyecrosse, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said William 
Powell's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace of 
Middlesex, and in the mean time for his forbearance from keeping a 
tipplinge house without licence. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

I September, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Christo- 
fer Riche and Jerom Hawley esqs. and J. P., of Edward Augur yoman 
and Roger Hill shoemaker, both of Houneslowe co. Midd., in the sum 
of twenty pounds each ; For the appearance, at the next General Session 
of the Peace, of Alice wife of John Godfrey of Houneslowe aforesaid 
bargeman, and in the mean time for her peaceful bearing towards all 
people. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

3 September, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in 
Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, William Pendleton alias Pen- 
nyngeton and Thomas Barnard, both late of London yomen, assaulted 
Henry Stone, he being in God's and the Queen's peace, and that 
William Pendleton with a sword gave the said Henry Stone on his 
right arm a mortal blow, of which he then and there died instantly. 
G. D. R., 4 Oct., 25 Eliz. 

10 September, 25 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Sir 
Thomas Wentworth knt. Lord Wentworth J. P., of John Gurney of 
London baker and John Leedes of Redcliffe miller, in the sum of five 
pounds each, and of Ralph Thickins of Whitechappell baker, in the 
sum of ten pounds; For the said Ralph's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

10 September, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackeney co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Matterdey late of London yoman stole 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 143 

a piece of linen doth worth ten pence, of the goods and chattels of 
John Stanbridge. At the head of the bill, the clerical memorandum 
" Cognovit Indictamentum ca' null' flagelletur." G. D. R., 4 Oct., 
25 Eliz. 

12 September, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Humfrey Smythe esq. J.P., of Thomas Spanke of London in the suni 
of ten pounds, and of Lybias A'Lee in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the appearance of the said Lybias at the next Session of the Peace. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 25 Eliz. 

15 September, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, John Snowden late of London Yoman stole " a stone- 
horse " worth five pounds, five gold ringes worth five pounds, and a 
saten dublett worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Edward Dymock esq. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Snowden was 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 26 Ehz. 

17 September, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Hum- 
frey Smythe esq. J.P. of Robert Hardinge cutler and Chistopher 
Vincent draper, both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields in the sum of ten 
pounds ; For the appearance at the next Session of the Peace of 
Phill Phippes, wife of Edward Phippes. G S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
25 Eliz. 

18 September, 25 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Robert Harrys one of the Masters of Chancery and J.P. for co. Midd., 
of John Rowley of Greys Inne Lane yoman and Edward Dolman of 
the same lane vytteler, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of John 
Baker of St. John's Street co. Midd. weyver in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said John Baker's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace, to answer " for kepyng a woman delivered with 
childe in his howse, and lettinge go the father." G. S. P. R., Michael- 
mas, 25 Eliz. 

19 September, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ruyslippe co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Grevell and Edward Marden, both late of 
London yomen, stole thirty-nine wethers, with other sheep, of the goods 
and chattels of James Hunte ; a white wether, of the goods and 
chattels of John Hunte ; and a white wether of the goods and chattels 
of Richard Symes. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' both prisoners were 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 26 Eliz. 

I October, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill, for not going to church, 
chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer, from the said day 
to I St January then next following, against John PJiillipes of Hamsted 
CO. Midd. gentleman, William Lord Vauxe, George Vauxe gentleman 
son of the said Lord Vauxe, and William Hollys yoman, all three of 
Tottenham ; Juliana Burd wife of William Burde of Harlingeton co. 



144 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Midd. gentleman, and John Rayson of the same parish yoman ; and 
Barnard Brocas and his wife Anne, of Tottenham co. Midd. G. D. R,, 
4 May, 26 Eliz. 

7 November, 25 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Padington co. Midd. 
on the night of the said day, Elizabeth Atkins late of London spynster 
broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of John Haynes esq., and 
took therefrom " duo veru ferri vocat' spittes " worth two shillings, 
" unum instrumentum ferri vocat' a grediern " worth two shillings, and 
" unum parr' foUium vocat' a paire of bellis," worth two shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of the said John Haynes. Putting herself ' Not 
Guilty ' of the burglary, Elizabeth put herself and was found ' Guilty ' 
of petty larceny ; the things stolen being appraised by the jury at ten- 
pence. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 26 Eliz. 

26 November, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway of the 
Stronde at the parish of St Clement-Danes, Anthony Turner late of 
Westminster tayler, struck Edward Penniaunt gentleman with a sword, 
thereby slaying him. G. D. R., . . . . Dec, 26 Eliz. 

14 December, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer, from 14 Dec. 
26 Elizabeth to nth March then next following, against William 
Lord Vauxe, Henry Vauxe and George Vauxe esquires, sons of the 
said Lord Vauxe, William HoUys yoman, William Worseley, yoman, 
Jocosa Barlowe widow, all of Tottenham co. Midd. ; Frances Robyn- 
son of Stepney co. Midd. widow; Juliana Burde wife of William 
Burde of Harlingeton co. Midd. gentleman, John Reason of Harlinge- 
ton aforesaid yoman ; and Philip Bassett of Islingeton co. Midd. esq. 
■ — Also, similar True Bill, for not going to church &c., from 22 Dec. 
26 Eliz. to 20th March then next following, against James Bray- 
brooke gentleman, Edward Yate gentleman, Humfrey Cumberfold 
{sic) gentleman, John Moore gentleman, Humfrey Eytton gentleman, 
Edward Poule gentleman, and Thomas Edwardes yoman, all of West- 
minster. G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

14 December, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any place of Common Prayer, from 14 December 26 EHz. to 
II March then next following, against William Lord Vaux, Henry 
Vaux esq. and George Vaux esq. sons of the said Lord Vaux, William. 
Hollys yoman, William Worseley yoman, Jocosa Barlowe widow, all of 
Tottenham co. Midd. ; Frances Robynson of Stepney co. Midd, 
widov/; Juliana Burde wife of William Burde of Harlingeton co. 
Midd. gentleman; John Reason of Harlingeton co. Midd. yoman; 
George Stanley and his wife Ethelreda Stanley, and William Holborne, 
all three of Chelsey co. Midd. ; William Tyrwhet esq., and Philip 
Basset esq., both of Islington co. Midd.— Also, a similar true Bill, for 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 145 

not going to church &c., from 27 December 26 Eliz. to 20 March 
then next following, against James Braybrooke gentleman, Edward 
Yatt gentleman, Humfrey Comberfold gentleman, John Moore gentle- 
man, Humfrey Eytton gentleman, Edward Poule gentleman and 
Thomas Edwardes yoman, all late of Westminster. G. D. R., 27 March, 
26 Eliz. 

6 January, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
night of the said day, Thomas Payne late of London gentleman 
broke burglariously into the house of Richard Lucas and stole there- 
from eighteen pounds in coined cold, forty shillings in numbered 
money, six gold rings worth four pounds, and a silver ring worth two 
shillings. — On the bill a memorandum that Thomas Payne was " extra 
prisonam." G. D. R., . . . ., 26 Eliz. 

3 February, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. 
on the said day, William Jones late of London yoman stole " unum par 
braccharum de . . . . vocat' buffe hose ad valenciam x^-.," a silk 
doublet worth forty shillings, " unum par braccharum vocat' a moccadoe 
hose ad valenciam i]s." and a pair of taylor's sheeres worth twelve 
pence, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Key. G. D. R., 27 
March, 26 Eliz. 

6 February, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth wife of John 
Bartell of the said parish yoman, otherwise styled Elizabeth Bartell of 
the same parish spinster, caused the death of Peter Cowell son of 
Ralph Cowell of the same parish, by practising upon him the devilish 
arts of witchcraft, from the said 6th of February to i March then next 
following, on which day the said Peter died of said Elizabeth's 
diabolical inchauntementes. — ^Of Elizabeth a note at the head of the bill 
says " Po se non cul nee rec." G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

8 February, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Robert Packe of Whitechappell whitebaker and 
John Jeffrey of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate, London, dicemaker, in 
the sum of ten pounds each, and of John Potter of Whitechappell 
yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds : For the said John Potter's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace. G. D. R., 27 March, 
26 Eliz. 

— February, 26 Elizabeth. ^Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Enfelde co. Midd. on view of the body of George Cooke late 
of the said parish maltman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
19 February 26 Eliz. the said George Cooke and another maltman were 
unladying of malte at Battelbrydge co. Surrey (sic), when words of quarrel 
passed between the said George Cooke and a certain John Whytlynge of 
Southwarke co. Surrey laborer, whereupon John Whytlynge took up a 



146 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

piece of wood, called " a pece of a syngle quarter," and with it gave 
the said George Cooke a mortal wound, of which he died on the 27th 
of the same month ; and That the said John Whytlynge thus feloniously 
killed and slew the said George Cooke. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 
27 February, 26 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at the Stronde co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Bluther and John . . . ., both 
late of London yomen, stole and carried away nine hundred pounds 
in coined gold, of the goods and chattels of Queen Elizabeth at the 
Stronde aforesaid. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

I March, 26 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before George 
Assheby esq. J, P., of Bonaventure Assheby of Westminster esq. and 
Roger Dove of Braintforde co. Midd. inh older, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each, and of Edward Stafforde gentleman, in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said Edward Stafiforde's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

I March, 26 Elizabeth.— True Bill, for being at Newington 
Greene co. Midd. on the said day and divers times before and after- 
wards a common disturber of the peace, against William Clarke elk. 
G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

3 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Edward Ayre of the Middle Temple in London 
gentleman, and John Markham of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields gentleman, 
in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Walter Markham of St. Giles's- 
in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said 
Walter Markham's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. 
Midd. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

3 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Robert 
Harrys one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of 
Edward Brooke of St. Johns Strete co. Midd. vytteler ; For the said 
Edward Brooke's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace, to answer " for lodgeinge suspected and masteries persons." 
G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

— March, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Twicknam co. Midd. on view of the body of John Davys 
alias Phillippes ot the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict of jurors, That, on 4 March 26 Eliz. between six and seven 
p.m., after exchanging words of quarrel in the house of James Heme 
of the said parish yoman, the said John Davys and a certain William 
Cauldwell, also of Twicknam yoman, went forth to the Buttes at 
Twicknam and made an affray together, John Davys being armed 
with a beaked staff and William Cauldwell with sword and buckler, 
in which affray William Cauldwell with his said sword gave John 
Davys a mortal blow, of which he died in half-an-hour, and That in 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 47 

this way William Cauldwell feloniously killed and slew John Davys. 
Of the proceedings at William Cauldwell's arraignment, a memo- 
randum at the bill's foot says " Et prefatus Johannes " {sic, instead of 
William) " Cauldwell po se cul ca null' petit librum Set respectuatur 
per discrecionem Curie." G. D. R.. 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

7 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of John Rowles draper and Oliver Daveis musiteon, 
both of St. Andrewe's parish in Holborn, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of John Wrighte of the same parish taylor, in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said John Wrighte's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace. G- D- R-, 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

— March, 26 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, at Bromeley co. Midd. 
on a certain day (no longer legible on the bill) of March 26 Eliz. 
Peter Moyses late of the said parish yoman said to Christopher Giffes 
these scandalous words of Her Majesty the present Queen, viz. ' The 
Quene is a rascall.' Po se cul : habeat penam statuti. G. D. R., 
27 March, 26 Eliz. 

10 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P. of George Fabyan of St. Michael's parish in Come- 
well (? Cornhill) London draper and Robert Statham of the parish of 
St. Savier's in SoVthworke salter, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For 
the appearance of Alice lies widow at the next General Session of the 
Peace. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

— March, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Islington co. Midd. on view of the body of William Dawes late of 
the said parish . . . . : With Verdict that, on 12 March 26 Eliz., 
the said William Dawes and a certain William Campnet late of London 
yomen were together in the highway at Islington when they quarrelled ; 
That William Campnet with his right hand struck William Dawes in 
the face, whereupon William Dawes drew his dagger and rushed upon 
William Campnet, who forthwith drew his sword, and with it gave 
William Dawes a mortal blow of which he died within half-an-hour ; 
and That in this way William Campnet feloniously killed and slew 
William Dawes. On his arraignment William Campnet put himself 
'Not Guilty 'of slaying feloniously, but ' Guilty ' of killing in self- 
defence. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

21 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood S.L., Recorder of London and J. P. for co. Midd., of Edward 
Barker of London esq., in the sum of twenty pounds, and Alexander 
Brett of Whitstanton co. Somerset esq., in the sum of one hundred 
pounds ; For the said Alexander's appearance at the next Gaol Deli- 
very. G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

21 March, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hounslow Heath on 

L 2 



148 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the said day, Henry Bodehouse clothworker, Robert Gryme yoman 
and Thomas Stapleton yoman, all three of Fletestrete in the parish of 
St. Dunstan-in-the-West, London, lay in ambush to assault and as- 
saulted Richard Cockes, and robbed him of " a woman's gowne of 
changeable taffeta " worth five pounds, a woman's petycote worth three 
pounds, and "unum reticulum crinale de auro anglice a golden caull 
ad valenciam liii.f." G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

24 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, on 
view of the body of a certain male infant : With Verdict of jurors. That 
Agnes Hughes late of Stebunheth spinster on 23 March 26 Eliz. gave 
birth to the same infant in a bedroom of the dwelling-house of Mathew 
Stafford of the said parish butcher, and forthwith killed and murdered 
it by suff"ocating it with both her hands. At her arraignment, Agnes 
Hughes put herself ' Not Guilty,' and was re'prieved before judgment 
on account of the uncertainty of the evidence. G. D. R., 4 May, 
26 Eliz. 

26 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood S.L. Recorder of London and J. P. for co. Midd., of Chris- 
topher Tilliard of Cowley co. Midd. and John Pickeringe of Harling- 
ton CO. Midd. yoman, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Ralph 
Tilliard of Cowley aforesaid yoman, in the sum of one hundred 
pounds ; For the said Ralph's appearance at the next Session of the 
Peace to be held at Fynesburie. G. D. R., 27 March, 26 Eliz. 

27 March, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Margaret within Westminster, on view of the 
body of James GuUey late of the said city showemaker : With Verdict 
that, on the night of the said day between nine and ten p.m., the said 
James Gulley was in the highway called Tuthill Street in the said city 
near the house of John Preist brewer, when John Medley of the same 
city tallowchaundler came upon the said James Gulley with malice afore- 
thought, and with a sword murdered the same James Gulley by giving 
him on the right side of his breast a mortal wound of which he died 
then and there instantly ; and further That William Peirce alias Peirsey 
late of the same city painter, and Thomas Hunter late of the same city 
brewer, knowing that he had perpetrated the said felony, received and 
comforted him. On his arraignment John Medley put himself ' Not 
Guilty' of murdering James Gulley with malice aforethought, but 
' Guilty ' of the felonious slaying of James Gulley called ' Chaunce 
Medley.' And the said John Medley, putting himself ' Guilty,' asked 
for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the 
form of the Statute. G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

30 March, 26 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Stephen Good late of Lon- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 149 

don yoman broke into the chamber of Thomas Hopton gentleman at 
St. Clement's-Danes Inn, without the bars of the New Temple, and 
stole therefrom two " silver sawcers '' worth fifty-three shillings and 
four pence, one " silver boole '' worth twenty-six shillings and eight 
pence, and four " hoodes for clokes " worth twenty shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of the said Thomas Hopton. G. D. R., 4 May, 
26 Eliz. 

II April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill for not going to church, 
chapel or any other place of Common Prayer from 10 Oct. 25 Eliz. to 
1 1 April then next following, against William Tyrwhytt of Islington co. 
Midd. esq. G. S. P. R., Easter, 26 Eliz. 

13 April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at Tot- 
tenham on the said day, Nicholas Kynge late of London yoman, as- 
saulted Thomas Goltston, and robbed him of three shillings and four 
pence in numbered money. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Nicholas Kynge 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

15 April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Jonas Huggens stole secretly from the person of Anne 
Watson, wife of William Watson, " a wroughte fallinge band " worth 
three shillings, "a tagge of golde" worth two shillings and six pence, 
and three halfpence in numbered money. Po se non cul nee rec. 
G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

21 April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said 21 April 
William Sandersone, late of Fynchley co. Midd. clerk, in the parish 
church of Fynchley aforesaid, assaulted Francis Atton husbandman, 
and beat and wounded him so that his life was despaired of. G. D. R., 
20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

24 April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Cowcrosse co. Midd. 
on the said day, Nicholas Grene late of London yoman stole " a blacke 
frice coate " worth eleven shillings and eight pence, of the goods and 
chattels of James Fraunces. Nicholas Greene put himself ' Guilty ' of 
petty larciny, and, the jury appraising the coat at eleven pence, he was 
delivered " solvend. feod." G. D. R., 4 May, 26 Eliz. 

26 April, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Hugh Pewe late of London gentleman stole a jewel worth 
eighty pounds, a hatt bande of pearls worth thirty pounds, and five 
yards of white silk called damaske worth three pounds, of the goods 
and chattels of Walter Rawley esq. at Westminster co. Midd. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Hugh Pewe asked for the book, read like a clerk and 
was remanded by the Court. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

I May, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, William Smithers alias 
Smithurse of the parish of St. Bottoles in the liberty of Charterhouse 
near London, from the said day to ist July next following, " docuit 



150 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

anglice kepte a common scole in capell' de Charterhowse predict " with- 
out the Hcerice of the bishop or ordinary of the diocese. G. D. R., 
S Oct., 26 Eliz. 

I May, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jerom Hawley 
esq. J.P., of Thomas Clynton (one of the servants of the Bishop of 
Gloucester) in the sum of ten pounds, and Wilham Brookes of the 
city of Gloucester yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said 
William's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Midd.— Also, 
the Recognizances, taken before the same Justice of the Peace on the 
same day, of the same William Brookes, in the sum often pounds, and 
the same Thomas Clynton, in twenty pounds, for the said Thomas's 
appearance at the same next Session of the Peace. They both appeared 
and were committed to Newgate. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

6 June, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of Mar- 
tyn Parker of Newgate Market draper and William Crotch of Wellough 
CO. Somersett gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said 
Thomas Payne's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd. 
G. D. R., . . . . 26 Eliz. 

16 June, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of 
Nicholas Kelley of Turmyll-Strete co. Midd., .... and Henry 
Bradshawe of Holborn Conduytte ' London ale brewer,' in the sum of 
twenty pounds each ; For the appearance, at the next Gaol Delivery, of 
Anne Kelley wife of the said Nicholas. G. D. R., .... 26 Eliz. 

23 June, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or 
any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 23 June 26 Eliz. to 28 
September then next following, against Barnard Brockas of Ickenham 
CO. Midd. gentleman, and Juliana wife of William Birde of Plarlingeton 
CO. Midd. gentleman, John Reason of Harlingeton yoman, William Lord 
Vaux of Hackney, George Vaux son of the aforesaid William Lord Vaux 
of the same parish gentleman, Robert Hughes of Uxbridge gentleman, 
and William Cooper of the parish of St. Clement Danes tayler. — Similar 
True Bill for not going to church from 25 March 26 EHz. to 30 Sept. 
then next following, against Thomas Walwyn of tjie parish of St. Giles 
in the Fields gentleman. — Similar True Bill for not going to church 
&c., from 26 April 26 Eliz. to 30 Sept. then next following, against 
John Carrell of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman. — Similar 
True Bill for not going to church &c. from 19 July 26 Eliz. to 16 
August then next following, against Richard and John Wyteman, both 
of Westminster yomen. — Similar True Bill for not going to church &c. 
from 17 May 26 Eliz. to 16 August then next following, against James 
Braybrooke gentleman, John Moore gentleman, Edward Yatt gentleman. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 151 

Humfrey Comberford gentleman, John Hewes yoman, Humfrey Eytton 
gentleman, Thomas Edwardes yoman, and Owin Fletcher yoman, all of 
Westminster. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

23 June, 26 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of 
Robert Wilkes of Islington beare-bruer and Adam Middleham of Greys 
Inne co. Midd. gentleman and Joseph Dixson of Fleetestreate notary, 
in the sum of forty pounds each, and Leonard Jake servant of the 
aforesaid Robert Wilkes, in the sum of one hundred pounds ; For the 
said Leonard Jake's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 
• ... 26 Eliz. 

25 June, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before C. Rithe 
J.P., of John Drewe of Howneslowe co. Midd., in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; whereby the said John Drewe bound himself to appear at the 
next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against " Care Sybill concerning 
the stealing of a silver cup." G. D. R., .... 26 Eliz. 

12 July, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Shortditche co. Midd. on view of the body of Elizabeth Arnold late 
of the said parish spynster : With Verdict of Jurors, that she died by 
Divine Visitation of ' the Tissicke ' on 1 1 July 26 Elizabeth. G. D. R., 
20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

14 July, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Thistleworthe co. Midd. on view of the body of John Felles of the said 
parish yoman : With Verdict of Jurors, that on 7 July 26 Eliz. between 
five and six a.m. the said John Felles and a certain George Ogden of 
the same parish yoman were together in God's and the Queen's peace in 
a certain bedroom within the house of WiUiam Davys at Thistleworthe 
tayler, when the two played together, pretending sportively to make 
an affray and fight one another, John Felles having in his right hand a 
staff worth a halfpenny and George Ogden having in his right hand a 
sword, still in the scabbard as he had no thought to do his playmate 
harm ; and that, whilst they were so playing,' John Felles ran in upon 
George Ogden and received in his left eye the point of the sword still 
in its scabbard, and so by mischance received a wound, of which he 
died on the 13th inst. ; and that in this manner John Felles came to his 
death by mischance. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

20 July, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Bunnys of Popler co. Midd. fisherman, and 
. . . . West of the same parish . . . ., in the sum of twenty 
pounds each, and of John Garrett of Popler yoman, in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said John Garrett's appearance at the next Session of 
the Peace, and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all 
persons, and especially towards Gilbert Dethicke alias Garter Knight 



152 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

(erga Gilbertum Dethicke alias Garter Militem). G. D. R., 5 Oct., 
26 Eliz. 

21 July, 26 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the said day of July, and 
at divers times before and afterwards, William Martin of Twickenham 
CO. Midd. laborer, and Agnes Tanner spinster, daughter of the said 
William's wife, committed the detestable crime of incest. G. D. R., 
31 March, 27 Eliz. 

I August, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Richard Pett of Deptford co. Kent gentleman 
and William Daborne of the parish of St. Benedict, Gracechurch, 
London, letherseller, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Henry 
Dudley of London gentleman, in the sum of sixty pounds • For the 
said Henry Dudley's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace, and in the mean time for his peaceful behaviour to all people 
and especially to Mary Moseley. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

I August, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of Richard Rodes of London wax-chaundler and 
Christopher Crofte of St. Martin's parish in Lecester gentleman, and 
Simon Eaton of Gadsbye co. Lecester, in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of John Milles of Cambridge joyner, in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the said John Milles's appearance at the next Session of the Peace 
for CO. Midd. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

22 August, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P. of Francis Rockley of Staple Inne co. Midd. gentle- 
man, and John Savell of Newe Inne gentleman, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and Francis Clapham of London gentlemen, in the sum 
of forty pounds ; For the said Francis Clapham's appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 EUz. 

25 August, 26 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys, one of the Masters of Chancery and J.P. for co. Midd. and 
Christopher Rith esq. J. P., of Randolph Bell of Fanchurch Street, 
London, marchaunt-taylour, in the sum of ten pounds, and Roger Bell 
of the He of Wyte taylour, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said 
Roger's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace. Memo- 
randum at the bill's foot : — " for lewd lyvinge." — Also the Recogni- 
zances, taken before the same Justices of the Peace on the same day, 
of Simon Webbe of the parish of Little Alhallows, London, cloth- 
worker, and William Wetherall of the same parish draper, in the sum 
of ten pounds each, and of Elizabeth Durrant of the same parish 
spynster, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Elizabeth's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace. At the bill's 
foot, the same memorandum: — " for lewd lyvinge." G. D. R. 
5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 153 

28 August, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, atHounslowe co. Midd. 
on the said day, James Berry late of London yoman stole "a dublett of 
peache collor satten " worth ten shillings, " unum par' braccharum de 
cloth of gold " worth ten shillings, a woollen-cloth cloak of a lighte coulor 
worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Henry Talbet esq. at 
Howneslowe. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

29 August, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Tower of London 
on the said day, George Pulham late of London yoman stole " a bason 
and an ewer of silver " worth twenty pounds, a cup called " a bolle of 
silver " worth four pounds, six silver spoons worth forty shillings, a 
" seawater greene " woollen-cloth cloak worth twenty shillings, and " an 
arminge swoorde " worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir 
William Gorge knt. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

3 September, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shorditche on the 
said day, Henry Edmondes late of Shorditche yoman, stole twenty-six 
shillings in numbered money, of the moneys of Ralph Clackwell. 
Reprieved because he was sick, Henry Edmondes was put on trial at 
the Gaol Delivery of 2 December 27 Eliz., when "po se non cul nee 
rec." G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 EHz. 

13 September, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the body of Robert Bisshoppe late of 
Westminster yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 1 2 Sept. 
26 Eliz. between five and six p.m., the said Robert Bisshoppe and a 
certain Walter Chamberlyn late of London yoman were together in the 
highway called The Broad Sanctuarie at Westminster, when after an 
interchange of hostile words they then and there drew forth their 
swords and daggers, and in the same common street made an affray, in 
which affray Walter Chamberlyn with his sword gave the said Robert 
Bisshoppe in the left side of his belly a mortal blow, of which he died, 
and That in this manner Walter Chamberlyn slew and killed Robert 
Bisshoppe. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

17 September, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islingeton co. 
Midd. on the said day, Richard Adams late of London yoman wrote 
letters to Cuthbert Perrie of the said parish that, unless he should give 
the sum of three pounds for a certain mark (metam vQcat' Creplegate 
.... in Fynnesberrie) on 18 September of the said year, he (Richard) 
would cause the said Cuthbert's barn to be burnt and consumed with 
fire. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Richard Adams was sentenced to be 
whipt through the city of London. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

24 September, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Holborn co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Corbet and Richard Lucas, both late of London 
yomen, stole two lawne bandes worth ten shillings and a " cambricke " 
band worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Zacharias Jones. 



154 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Both thieves acknowledged the indictment ; John Corbet was sentenced 
to be hung, whilst Richard Lucas was reprieved before judgment. — ^Also 
against the same two felons a True Bill for burglary committed on the 
house of Martin Smythe of Higheholborne gentleman, on the night of 
27 Sept. 26 Eliz.— G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

24 September, 26 Eliz.\beth. — Triie Bill that, at Grayes Inne co. 
Midd. about eleven p.m. on the night of the said day, William Crosse 
and John Thorpe, both late of London yomen, feloniously broke into 
the dwelling-house of Charles Metham gentleman (William Devys the 
said Charles Metham's servant being then in the said house), with the 
intention of despoiling the said Charles Metham of his goods and chat- 
tels. William Crosse put himself ' Not Guilty ' of the felony, but " cul 
de fraccione et intracione cubiculi," and was remanded for other felonies 
with which he was charged. John Thorpe, also putting himself ' Not 
Guilty ' of the felony but guilty of the breaking into and entrance, was 
sentenced to be whipt in Grays Inne Lane. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 26 Eliz. 

25 September, 26 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Mary Matfellon alias Whitechappell on view 
of the body of a male infant, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
24th instant in a bedchamber, within the house of Cornelius Peterson 
of the said parish shoemaker, Martha Godfrey of the said parish 
spynster being in bed gave birth to the same male infant, and forthwith 
at the instigation of the devil assaulting it with a meat-knife gave it 
on the fore part of its body a mortal wound of which it instantly died, 
and that Martha thus slew and murdered the said male infant. G. D. R., 
S Oct., 26 Eliz. 

I October, 26 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Noble of West- 
minster yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of 
Common Prayer, from i October 26 Eliz. to 10 November then next 
following. — Similar True Bill, in the same roll, against James Bray- 
brooke gentleman, John Moore gentleman, Humfrey Comberford 
gentleman, John Hewes gentleman, Owyn Fletcher yoman, Humfrey 
Ettone gentleman, Thomas Edwardes chaundeler, Edward Yatt gentle- 
man, Richard Johnstone yoman, John Wyteman yoman, all of West- 
minster, for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer, from 
20 August 26 Eliz. to 31 October then next following. G. D. R. 
20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

.... 26 Elizabeth.— True Bill that Walter Hinxman of St. 
Johns Strete co. Midd. tayler, appointed one of the collectors for the 
poor of St. Johns Strete for an entire year from 25 April 25 Eliz., at divers 
times during his year of office and by colour of his said office took un- 
justly seven pence of William Atkynson and seven pence of John Bostocke 
and other moneys of many other inhabitants of the same street for the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 55 

use of the poor and converted them to his own use. G D. R., 5 Oct., 
26 Eliz. 

5 December, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
December, at Kentishetowne, Thomas Sherlocke late of Kentishetowne 
CO. Midd. clerk, alias Thomas Towthedrawer of the same place clerk, 
voluntarily said, used and celebrated a certain private mass, against 
the form of a certain statute of i Elizabeth, and against the said 
Queen's crown and dignity ; and that at the time of the said celebra- 
tion, Katherine Bellamy late of Kentishtowne was present, and aiding 
and abetting the said Thomas Sherlock alias Toothdrawer. G. D. R., 
31 March, 27 Eliz. 

5 December, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
December, Henry Hudnoll junior of Northchurch co. Hertford yoman, 
entered the house of Richard Evered at Mosham's Ende in Stanes 
CO. Midd., and stole therefrom a purse imbrodered with gold worth 
eight shillings and a silver spoon worth seven shillings. — On the 
bill a memorandum that, at the next Gaol Delivery of 26 April 
27 Eliz., the said Henry Hudnoll put himself 'Not Guilty' (po se 
non cul nee rec). G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

15 December, 27 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of Hackney, on view of the body of Thomas 
Altam late of London clothier, there lying dead : With Verdict that, 
on the nth instant, the said Thomas was riding on a gelding to 
Waltam Stowe to do business with Robert Hodgkinson of Waltam 
Stowe scrivener, and was so riding in the high-way in the parish of 
Hackney, between nine and ten a.m., beside a certain rivulet called 
' the Water of Ley,' near the ' lowbridge,' when the gelding stumbled 
and threw him into the river, so that he then and there died by mis- 
chance of drowning. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

31 December, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the body of John Stile late of the 
said city gentleman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
28th inst. between the hours three and four p.m., the said John Stile 
and a certain William Glasier, late of the same city yoman, after 
parleying with one another in a common street called ' Longeditche ' 
of the said city, made an affray with one another, each of them fight- 
ing with sword and dagger, in which affray William Glasier with his 
sword gave John Stile on his left fore-leg a mortal wound of which 
he died on the last day of the said month ; and that, in so causing 
John Stile's death, William Glasier slew and killed him feloniously. 
G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

3 January, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Richard Assheley 



IS6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

late of London yoman : With Verdict that the said Richard died in 
the said gaol of a certain infirmity called ' the impostume of the 
stomach.' G. D. R., 20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

7 January, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken in Newgate Gaol on 7 January 27 Eliz., on view of the body 
of Edward Cuffin, late of London yoman : With Verdict that the said 
Edward Cuffin, being a prisoner of the said gaol, died there by 
Divine Visitation of "the burning fever." G. D. R., 20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

8 January, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said 8th of Jan., 
Christofer Calvert late of London yoman, stole a carkas of mutton 
worth five shillings, " et quandam peciam sepi vocat' a tallowe " worth 
twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of John Warderne at Easte- 
smythefielde. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Christofer Calvert asked for 
the book ; when it was objected that he was a clerk who had been con- 
victed in the county of Bedford of a felony done there ; to which he 
replied he was not the man so convicted ; but by the oath of jurors it 
was found that he was the same man. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

12 January, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, on view of the body of 
Richard Awdyence, late of Woxbridge co. Midd. yoman, there lying 
dead : With Verdict that the said Richard Awdyence died immediately 
of a wound, given him in the fore-part of his body, by the sword of 
Thomas Smythe one of the yomen of the Queen's Chamber, in a fray 
which they fought with one another, on the nth of the present month 
in the high-way of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, each of them fighting with 
sword and buckler ; and that in this way Thomas Smythe feloniously 
killed and slew Richard Awdyence. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 27 Eliz. 

6 February, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Heath of 
St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. gentleman and Clement Smythe of the 
same parish gentleman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual 
place of Common Prayer, from the said 6th of February to the nth 
of March next following. — Similar True Bill in the same roll against 
William Turrett of Islingeton co. Midd. esq. for not going to any 
usual place of Common Prayer, from n January 27 Eliz. to the nth 
of March next following. — Similar True Bill in the same roll, against 
Elizabeth Jarrett and Jocosa Jarrett of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields spin- 
sters ; Sir John Arrundell knt. and Erasmus Saunders gentleman and 
Richard Owyn gentleman, all three of Clarkenwell co. Midd. ; Juliana 
Burde, wife of William Burde of Harlington co. Midd. gentleman, and 
John Reason of the same parish yoman, for not going to any usual 
place of Common Prayer from n December 27 Eliz. to the nth of 
March then next following. — Also, similar True Bill, in the same roll, 
for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 157 

from 20 November 27 Eliz. to the 2nd of February then next following, 
against James Braybrooke gentleman, Humfrey Comberford gentleman, 
Edward Yate gentleman, John More gentleman, John Hewes clerk, 
Thomas Edwardes chaundler, Richard Johnsonn yoman, Owen Fletcher 
yoman, and John Noble yoman, all of Westminster co. Midd. G. D. R., 
31 March, 27 Eliz. 

18 February, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood S.L., Recorder of London and J.P. for co. Midd., of 
Robert Bradley of the parish of St. Giles-without-Cripplegate ' beare- 
clarke,' and Thomas Thome of the same parish butcher, in the sum of 
ten pounds each, and of Thomas Norton of the same parish baker, in 
the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Thomas's appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery, and for his peaceful bearing in the mean time to 
all persons and more especially to Giles Hodgson vintner of London. 
G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

19 February, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
February, Joan, wife of James Barringer of Harroweelde co. Midd. 
laborer, alias Joan Barringer of Harrowe aforesaid spinster, practised 
the detestable arts of witchcraft on and against Rose Edlyn daughter of 
Richard Edlyn of the said parish, with the intention of murdering the 
same Rose, who languished from the effects of the said diabolical 
practice till she died thereof on the 1 7th of March then next following. 
Putting herself 'Not Guilty,' Joan Barringer persisted in her plea. 
G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

28 February, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
February, Richard Morfytt cook and John Deeping alias Oliver tayler, 
both late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields and Anthony Guye of HoUowaye 
CO. Midd. yoman, and William Bradstocke late of Howneslowe co. 
Midd. yoman, entered the dwelling-house of Christofer Haywarde 
clerk, in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, and stole therefrom a dark woollen 
cloak worth forty shillings, eight rings of gold worth ten pounds, forty- 
eight pieces of coined gold called "rialles and soueraignes" worth 
twenty-four pounds, and twenty-four pounds in numbered money, of 
the goods and chattels of the said Christopher Haywarde. — With 
memorandum that, at the Gaol Delivery of 26 April (sic) 27 Eliz. John 
Deepinge alias Olyver put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the book, read it 
like a clerk and was remanded that he might make satisfaction for the 
things stolen ; and that Anthony Guye put himself ' Guilty,' asked for 
the book, could not read and was hung. G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

I March, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill, for not going to church, 
chapel or any place of Common Prayer, from i March 27 Eliz. to 31 
May then next following, against James Braybrooke gentleman, Hum- 
frey Comberford gentleman, Edward Yate gentleman, John Hewes 



IS8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

clerk, Thomas Edwards ..... Owin Fletcher yoman, and 
Richard Johnson yoman. — Also, similar True Bill, for not attending 
church &c. from 25 March 27 Eliz, to 24 June then next following, 
against William Tyrwhytt of Islington esq.. Sir John Arrundell of 
Clarkenwell knt., Erasmus Saunders of Clarkenwell gentleman ; and 
William Lord Vauxe, Henry Vauxe esq., George Vauxe gentleman, 
Margaret Champneys spynster, all four of Hackney ; Edward .... 
esq., William Cowper taylor, his wife Katherine Cowper, and Thomas 
Heathe gentleman, all four of St. Clement's Danes ; Juliana Burde 
wife of William Burde gent, and John Reason yoman, all three of 
Harlington co. Midd. G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

6 March, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd., on the night of the said day, John Deepinge alias 
Olyver late of London yoman, broke into the church of the said 
parish, and stole therefrom eight bumbards ,called calyvers worth four 
pounds, a buff jerkyn worth ten shilliiigs, two swords and two daggers 
worth twenty shillings, a piece of iron and steel called a head-peece 
worth two shillings, three instruments called " flaskes and tucheboxes " 
wprth two shillings ; of the goods and chattels of the parishioners of 
the said parish. At the bill's head a memorandum, that John Deepinge 
put himself ' Guilty,' and was exonerated " by benefit of clergy, 
allowed to him after this felony for another felony." — ^This felon's 
action in respect to the other felony, for which he had benefit of clergy, 
appears on a parchment certifying how he pleaded the benefit of clergy 
granted to him at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, held on 31 March {sic) 
27 Eliz., for the felony of breaking (on 28 February 27 Eliz.) into the 
house of Christopher Haywarde clerk at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, and 
stealing therefrom a woollen cloak worth forty shillings, eight gold rings 
worth ten pounds, and forty-eight pounds in money. Indicted for this 
felony, at the Sessions of the Peace held at the Castell in Seint John's 
Streete on 31 March 27 Eliz., he appeared on the same day at the Old 
Bailey before the Justices for delivering the Gaol of Newgate, and 
declaring himself 'Not Guilty,' put himself on the country. Found 
' Guilty ' by a jury, he pleaded his clergy, and on reading the book was 
burnt on the left hand and delivered. These facts he pleaded in bar 
of punishment for the felony done on 6 March 27 Eliz. ; on which it 
was adjudged by the Justices for the Gaol Delivery of 26 May 27 Eliza- 
beth " quod prefatus Johannes Deepinge eat inde sine die." Thus the 
benefit of clergy granted for the felony done on 28th Feb. operated in 
the ensuing May so as to acquit him of the felony done on 6th March. 
— For the conflict of the date 31st March of this record with the date 
26th April in the entry on p. 157, the present Editor is not accountable. 
G. D. R., 26 May, 27 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 59 

10 March, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Stephen Prentice, 
late a prisoner in the gaol of Newgate : With Verdict that the said 
Stephen languished for three weeks of an infirmity, called the ' pining 
sicknes,' and died thereof on the 9th of the present month. 
G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

10 March, 27 Elizabeth.— True Bill, that Margery Parker, late of 
London spynster, stole a leather purse worth . . . ., a piece of 
coined gold worth " half a sovereign," and five pounds and ten 
shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of 
William Newse of Shorediche. G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

18 March, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Johns Street, in the parish of Clerkenwell co. Midd., on 
view of the body of John Craggen late of the said street yoman, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that the aforesaid John Craggen and a certain 
Robert Marshe, late of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. smyth, were 
together between one and two o'clock p.m. on 17 February 27 Eliza- 
beth, in St. John's Street co. Midd. and near the dwelling-house of a 
certain Mathew Shaxper of the said street yoman ("juxta domum 
mansionalem cujusdam Mathei Shaxper de St. John's Street predict', 
yoman ") ; And that the aforesaid John Craggen and Robert Marshe 
went from the aforesaid street to a certain field called Woodes Close in 
the parish of Clerkenwell with the intention of fighting ; And that after 
coming to the said field at the said time, the said John Craggen and 
Robert Marshe drew forth their swords and daggers and made an affray, 
in which the said Robert Marshe with his sword gave the said John 
Craggen on the fore part of his head a mortal wound, of which he 
languished from the same 17th of February to the 17th of March, 
when he died thereof ; and that in this way the said Robert murdered 
the said John. With memorandum, at the bill's foot, that the said 
Robert on his trial put himself ' Not Guilty ' of slaying feloniously 
with malice aforethought, but ' Guilty ' of killing the said John in 
Chaunce-Medley J and that he was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
31 March, 27 Eliz. 

28 March, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Jerom 
Hawley esq. J. P., of Richard Edlyn of Parke Gate Hatchende in the 
parish of Harrowe co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the 
said Richard's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, to 
give evidence against Joan Barringer, suspected of a felony. G. D. R., 
31 March, 27 Eliz. 

30 March, 27 Elizabeth. — -Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Giles Simpson in the parish of St. Mary Wollner 
goldsmith, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the appearance of the 



l6o MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

said Giles and of his apprentice Maurice St. John, at the next Gaol 
Delivery. G. D. R., 31 March, 27 Eliz. 

15 April, 27 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the said day at Clarken- 
well CO. Midd., Edward Browne late of London yoman stole a silver cup, 
worth thirty-five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Barnabas New- 
man. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Edward Browne asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered in accordance with the statute. 
G. D. R., 26 May, 27 Eliz. 

17 May, 27 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the parish of St. Giles-without-Cripplegate London co. Midd. on 
view of the body of Richard Blisse late of the said parish yoman, there 
lying dead : With Verdict of jurors, that the said Richard Blisse, a 
certain Leonard Underbill late of the same parish yoman, and Ralph 
Nashe of Watton co. Hertford yoman, on 24 March 27 Eliz. between 
ten and eleven p.m., were in the highway of St. Giles's aforesaid near 
the dwelling-house of a certain Geoffrey Leveret, when Richard Blisse 
and Ralph Nashe quarrelled and fought together, Ralph Nashe being 
armed with " a bearinge bille " and Richard Blisse being armed with 
"a pyked staffe"; And That in the affray Ralph Nashe with his said 
bearinge-bille gave Richard Blisse under the left side of his breast a 
mortal wound, of which he died on 1 7 May next following ; and that 
Leonard Underbill was present at the said affray aiding and encourag- 
ing the said Ralph Nashe ; and that in this way Ralph Nashe and 
Leonard Underbill killed and slew the said Richard Blisse. G. D. R., 
2 July, 27 Eliz. 

24 May, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewoode S.L., Recorder of London and J. P. for co. Midd., of 
Anthony Babington of Dethick co. Derbie esq. and Henry Marsha of 
London letherseller, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and George 
Vauxe of Harredon co. Northampton esq. in the sum of forty pounds ; 
For the said George Vauxe's appearance at the next General Session of 
the Peace. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 

25 May, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Mary at 
the Savoyattbe Stronde co. Midd., Lawrence Medoppealias Grymshawe, 
late of London yoman, stole two hundred pounds in coined gold, of 
the goods chattels and moneys of Edward Abarrow esq. — Also, True 
Bill against the same Lawrence Medoppe ah'as Grymshawe for stealing 
on the same day ninety-three pounds in coined gold, of the goods and 
chattels of the same Edward Abarrow esq., at the parish of St. Mary 
of the Savoye aforesaid : With record of proceedings (ending in the 
prisoner's acquittal), from which it appears that the said Edward 
Abarrowe esq. put the same two hundred and ninety-three pounds of 
coined gold, being in a certain leather purse, upon a table in bis bed- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. l6l 

room in the aforesaid parish, and told John Barrowe gentleman to take 
the same purse and money to Westminster ; and That on this, Lau- 
rence Meddoppe alias Grymshawe, being servant of the said Edward, 
took the same purse and money, to carry it to Westminster with the 
said Edward (sic) Abarrowe, and on the way was rebuked by the said 
Edward Abarrowe for carrying it carelessly in these words, " Yf thowe 
carrye this money so losely one or other maye snatche yt from the and 
ronne awaye withe yt ; " and that after these words the said Edward 
(sic) Abarrowe told the said Laurence to carry the said purse and 
money to Westminster ; after which order (according to the prosecu- 
tion) Lawrence Medoppe alias Grymshawe made off with the money, 
with the intention of defrauding his master of it and converting it to 
his own use. — The perplexity of this story is obviously due to the 
carelessness of the draughtsman of the record, who manifestly wrote 
by mistake Edward for John in the two places of the record, noted sic. 
The servant was accompanying John Abarrowe alias Barrowe when he 
was reproved for carrying the money carelessly, and it was John who 
reproved him. That he was acquitted of felonious purpose appears 
from the fact that, at the next ensuing Gaol Delivery (i Oct 27 Eliz.) 
it was decreed that " eat inde sine die." G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

27 May, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewoode S.L., Recorder of London and J. P. for co. Midd. of 
Thomas Payne haberdasher and Robert Brigges blacksmith, both of 
the parish of St. Andrew-in-the- Wardrobe, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of John Chambers of Seint Jones Strete co. Midd. merchaunt- 
taylour in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of the said 
John Chambers and his wife Helen at the next • Gaol Delivery. 
G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

2 June, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey Smythe 
esq. J. P., of Nicholas Franke, servant of Henry Sacheverell of London 
citizen and vintner, in the sum of ten pounds ; For his appearance 
at the next Session for co. Midd., to give evidence against Thomas 
Warner. G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

4 June, 27 Elizabeth. • — Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Christopher Corye of the parish of St. Vedast in 
Fosterlane London scrivener, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the 
appearance of the said Christopher and also of William Wingfield of 
the parish " Sancti Alphegi " London carpenter, at the next Session of 
the Peace. G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

10 June, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Thomas Shelley of Lowton co Essex yoman, 
Timothy Fieldinge of the parish of Aldermar .... London 
yoman, Ralph Wardrobe of the parish of St. Mary Botulphe London 



1 62 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

haberdasher, and John Amis of Brastede co. Kent yoman in the 
sum of forty pounds each, and of Christopher Amis of Popler co. 
Midd. yoman in the sum of sixty pounds ; For the said Christopher 
Amis's appearance at the next General Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 
2 July, 27 Eliz. 

12 June, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of Peter Hales 'Of the Queen's chamber and James 
Smashaw of the parish of St. Clement Danes, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and of Reginald Halle, servant of Sir Ralph Hawley knt., 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Reginald's appearance at 
the next Session for co. Midd.' G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

13 June, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of Patrick Warde " de veteri Judaismo '' London 
grocer, in the sum of ten pounds ; For his appearance at the next 
Sessibn for co. Midd., to give evidence against Thomas Waterhouse 
and Robert Clegge. G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

16 June, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harrys esq. J. P., of Henry Sacheverell of St. John's Strete taylor, 
Nicholas Lawrence of the Old Change in London chaundler, Robert 
Bryckman of Cowe Lane clothworker, and John Holland of St. John's 
Street taylor, in the sum of five pounds each ; For the appearance of the 
said Henry Sacheverell's wife Margery Sacheverell at the next Session 
of the Peace. At the bill's foot this memorandum : — " Margery 
Sacheverell was kept at Chamber's house.'' G. D. R., 2 July, 27 Eliz. 

19 June, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stratford-at-Bowe on 
the said day, Thomas Crowe, late of London barbor-surgeon, stole a 
grey gelding worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of John 
Thorneton. Po se cul ca null : Rep' ante judicium. G. D. R., 2 July, 
27 Eliz. 

30 June, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at West- 
minster, William Aymon late of London yoman, stole secretly from 
the person of Thomas Watson a purse worth a penny, a silver ring 
worth two shillings, " duas pecias auri cuniati vocat'"half soueraignes ad 
valenciam xxs.," another piece of coined gold called a half crowne 
worth two shillings and sixpence, and twenty-two shillings and eight- 
pence of numbered money, being in the said purse. Po se cul ca null 
Sus. G. D. R., 2 July. 27 Eliz. 

I July, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Justices of the 
Peace at Fynnesberrie co. Midd., of Henry Sacheverell of Seint John- 
strete taylor, and Richard EUyott in the sum of twenty pounds each ; 
For the appearance, at the next General Session of the Peace, of 
Margaret wife of the said Henry Sacheverell, and in the mean time for 
her peaceful bearing to all people. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 63 

20 August, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Nicholas Langeford 
gentleman, his wife Martha, and John Haynes yoman, Thomas Smythe 
yoman, William Garner yoman, Margaret Gierke spinster, Isabella 
Potter spinster, and Frances Gooke spinster, servants of the aforesaid 
Nicholas Langeford, for not going to church, chapel or any other 
usual place of Common Prayer, from 20 August 27 Eliz. to i August 
28 Eliz. — Similar True Bill, for not going to any usual place of Gom- 
mon Prayer, from 30 June 27 Eliz. to i October then next following, 
against Anthony Higgyns of Hendon co. Midd. gentleman, Agnes 
Thomas of Ruislippe co. Midd. spinster, William Burde of Harlingeton 
CO. Midd. gentleman, his wife Juliana, and his servant John Reason ; 
also against William Lord Vauxe, his sons Henry Vauxe and George 
Vauxe, William Vachell yoman, John Parker yoman, William Gheyney 
yoman, Valentine Kelhsoun yoman, servants of the aforesaid William 
Lord Vauxe, all of Hackney co. Midd. ; and against Andrew Mallorie 
gentleman, his wife Elizabeth Mallorie, and his servants Anthony 
Brackenburie yoman, Thomas Hall yoman, and William Nuttall yoman, 
all of Hackney co. Midd. — Also, on the same file, similar True Bill, 
for not going to any usual place of Gommon Prayer, against Mary 
Isam widow, Joan Tremayne wife of Richard Tremayne gentleman, 
Jane Tremayne spinster, all three of Stepney co. Midd. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 28 Eliz. 

22 August, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Glement's Danes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, William Sowthern late of London yoman, 
entered the house of Richard Lyne, and stole therefrom a silver-gilt 
' salt ' with a cover worth four pounds, a silver * salt ' worth eighteen 
shillings, three silver-gilt cups called ' tanckerdes ' worth twelve pounds, 
three other silver-gilt cups called ' bolles ' worth nine pounds, " a stone 
cuppe garnished with silver and gilte " worth thirty shillings, twelve 
silver-gilt spoons worth three pounds, fourteen gold rings worth ten 
pounds, divers precious stones called ' perelles ' worth five shiUings, 
two precious stones called rubies worth twenty shillings, one precious 
stone called a Turkes worth six shillings, one precious stone called a 
diamond worth thirty shillings, twelve " paynted fruyte trenchers " worth 
seven pounds, with moneys and other chattels. G. D. R., 30 Sept., 
27 Eliz. 

27 August, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Flower, 
Robert Milborne, Simon Reve, and Mary wife of the said Simon, all 
of St. Giles's-in-the- Fields, for not going to church or any other usual 
place of Common Prayer from the said 27th of August to the 26th of 
September next following. — Also similar True Bill, in the same roll, 
against Humfrey Comberford gentleman, John Moore gentleman, John 
Hewes clerk, Owin Fletcher yoman, Thomas Edwards chaundler, 

M 2 



164 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Richard Johnson yoman, Robert Archer yoman, Robert Barnes yoman, 
all of Westminster, for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer, 
from 10 July 27 Eliz. to 26 September then next following. G. D. R., 
30 Sept., 27 Eliz. 

3 September, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-postmortem, 
taken at St. John's Street co. Midd., on view of the body of Mary Keys 
alias Becke, late of Islington co. Midd. spinster, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, between one and two of the night of 2 September, the 
said Mary was in the Queen's prison called ' The Cadge ' in St. John's 
Street aforesaid, when she killed herself by binding a girdle round her 
neck and by means of the same girdle hanging herself by the neck to 
a certain post. G. D. R., 30 Sept., 27 Eliz. 

5 September, 27 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Charterhouse-lane 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Chesterton late of London spin- 
ster stole two pieces of coined gold called English crowns worth ten 
shillings, and one piece of coined gold called half-a-crown worth two 
shillings and sixpence, and twenty-two pence in numbered money, of 
the moneys of Robert Williams. G. D. R., 30 Sept., 27 Eliz. 

7 September, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of John Stowe of the parish of St. Clement Danes co. 
Midd. cutler and Ralph Haughton tailor, in the sum of twenty pounds 
each, and Ralph Masson of the same parish merchant-taylor, in the 
sum of forty pounds ; For the said Ralph Masson's appearance at the 
next General Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his peace- 
fulbearing towards all people, and especially towards Maurice Owen 
clothworker. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 

II September, 27 Elizabeth. Recognizances, taken before Hum- 
frey Smythe esq. J.P., of John Macham of St. Bennett's parish at 
Powles Wharfe London barber-surgion, and William Smythe of St. 
Foster's parish London clerk, and of Richard Dennall of St. Toole's 
parish in Sowthwarke, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Bryan 
Bywater of Edmunton clerk in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the 
said Bryan Bywater's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 

18 September, 27 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir 
Owyn Hopton knt.. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J. P., of 
William Godwarde of the Middell Tempell gentleman, in the sum of 
ten pounds ; For the said William Godwarde's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace, to give evidence against Edward Edwardes. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 

22 September, 27 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate, on view of body of 
John Harryson late of the said parish taylor, there lying dead : With 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 16$ 

Verdict that, on the 20th of the present month, the said John was 
standing in Old Street near his own house, when Maurice Jones with 
malice aforethought struck him on the right part of his body with a 
meat-knife, giving him a mortal blow, of which he died on the following 
day. G. D. R., 30 Sept., 27 Eliz. 

I October, 27 Elizabeth.— True Bill, that Roger Edlyn of Pyn- 
nor CO. Midd. yoman, on the said day and at divers times before and 
afterwards, exercised the calling of a Badger, and bought and sold ten 
quarters of beans, against the form of the statute provided for fore- 
stallers, regraters and ingrossers. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 27 Eliz. 

21 November, 28 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of 
November, and on divers other days before and afterwards, Dorothea, 
the wife of William Prettye of St. John's Strete co. Midd. gentleman, 
being a woman of good and honourable estate and condition, in mani- 
fold ways was abused and maltreated by a certain Thomas Foster, son 
of Susanna Foster, and by reason of the said Susanna's encourage- 
ment of her said son ; and that when on the aforesaid day the aforesaid 
Dorothea went to Clarkenwell to compass remedy and due correction 
of the same Thomas Foster's ill conduct and prave manners at the 
hands of his pedagogue, a certain Francis Clement, the aforesaid 
Susanna Foster, wife of Thomas Foster of St. John's Strete co. Midd. 
gentleman, otherwise styled Susanna Foster of St. John's Strete spyn- 
ster, as a brawler and disturber of the peace, having no care for the 
discipline and good education of her said son, but rather as a woman 
altogether devoid of feminine modesty, uttered divers scandalous and 
opprobrious words of the aforesaid Dorothea, and then and there at 
Clarkenwell assaulted, beat, shook and maltreated the same Dorothea, 
giving her divers blows on the head and face, and that when the 
same Dorothea, after being thus maltreated, would fain have withdrawn 
from the house, the said Susanna held the door shut, and in a high 
voice uttered these English words, " Nay shee " (inuendo prefatam 
Dorotheam) " shall not goe yet shee shall haue more ere shee goe." 
G. D. R., 27 July, 28 Eliz. 

6 January, 28 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Roland Argall of St. Sepulchre's parish in London 
esq. and Gabriel Grimston of Edmonton co. Midd. gentleman, in the 
sum of forty pounds each, and German Fryer of the parish of St. 
Giles-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of eighty pounds ; For the 
said German Fryer's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace, and in the mean time for his good conduct. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 28 Eliz. 

15 February, 28 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Harris one of the Masters of Chancery and J. P. for co. Midd., of 



l66 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Richard Hayes of Blackman's Street in Sowthwark clerk, and Richard 
Lingham of St. Saviour's -parish in Sowthwark cobbler, in the sum of 
five pounds each, and of Thomas Tyanson of Smithfeilde tailor, in the 
sum of ten pounds ; For the said Thomas Tyanson's appearance at the 
next General Session of the Peace, to answer " for takinge of henges 
from the gate of Marybone Parke." G. S. P. R., Easter, 27 Eliz. 

3 March, 28 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of Clement Carre of St. Dunstan's parish in Fleete 
Street draper, and William Milborne of the same parish tayler, in the 
sum of ten pounds each, and of Francis Bradforde servant of Edward 
Sudley of the Stronde gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For 
the said Francis's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 28 Eliz. 

I April, 28 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, Richard 
Moyle late of London yoman stole and carried off certain pieces or 
parcels of silver, called " coppyns or peces of sylver," worth ten pounds, 
of the goods and chattels of Queen Elizabeth found at the Tower of 
London. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 28 Eliz. 

7 April, 28 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Christopher 
Ryth esq. J.P., of Robert Wyne of Isleworthe co. Midd. tailor, in the 
sum of ten pounds ; For his appearance at the next General Session 
of the Peace, " to answer to the keepinge of a lewde strumpett of 
incontynent lief, to the great annoyance- of the honest parisshioners 
of Isleworth beforesaid, to the evill example of others, as they doe 
afiErme of whome there be monye there and some defended and keapt 
from punyshment by theire resisting the officers there." G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 28 Eliz. 

9 April, 28 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Henry Townsend of the parish of St. Clement 
Danes sealmaker, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Thomas 
Shelley of the same parish haberdasher, in the sum of forty pounds ; 
For the said Thomas Shelley's appearance at the next General Session 
of the Peace. G. $• P. R., Easter, 28 Eliz. 

4 July, 28 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Sir Owyn 
Hopton knt.. Lieutenant of the Tower of London, of Joan Betternan 
of St. Katherine's widow, and William Joones of London, servant of 
Lady Sidney, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the appearance of 
the said Joan at the next Session of the Peace held at Phinsbury. 
G. D. R., 27 July, 28 Eliz. 

16 July, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition - post - mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Oliver 
Haywarde late of London clerk, there lying dead: With Verdict 
that the said Oliver, being within the said gaol, died there by the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 6/ 

Divine Visitation of "the Burning Feaver." G. D. R., 27 July, 
28 Eliz. 

22 August, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken in the parish of St. Katherine co. Midd., on view of the body of 
Robert Corbysheley late of the said parish yoman, and servant of 
William Pope, bailiff of St. Katherine, there lying dead, who, according 
to the finding of the jury, died immediately of a blow given him by 
Eloy Gillot, in an affray that occurred between them in the highway 
of the said parish on the 21st instant. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 28 Eliz. 

15 September, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Islyngton co. Midd., on view of the body of Katherine Bacon, 
late the wife of Richard Bacon of the said parish collermaker : With 
Verdict that she died by Divine Visitation, of weakness and failure of 
power, consequent on her delivery on the loth inst. of a still-born 
child. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 28 Eliz. 

25 September, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, , on view of the body of Richard Fludd 
late of London weaver, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being in 
the said gaol Richard Fludd fell ill of the malady called " the Pining 
Sicknes,'' of which he died on the 24th instant, after ten days of ill- 
ness. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 28 Eliz. 

I October, 28 Elizabeth. — True Bill against William Byrde 
gentleman, his wife Juliana, and John Reason yoman, of Harlington 
CO. Midd. ; William Holborne of Chelsey gentleman ; Bernard Brockas 
of . . . . gentleman, William Lord Vauxe of Hackeney ; Andrew 
Mallorye of Tottenham co. Midd. gent., his wife . . . ., and his 
servants Anthony Brackenbury, Thomas Hall and William Nuttall, 
yomen, and*. Jane the wife of Ralph Lardge of Tottenham ; Nicholas 
Langford of Fulham co. Midd. esq. and his wife Martha ; Thomas 
Gawinge gentleman, the Lady Mary Dudley widow, John Gyfford esq., 
all three of Islington ; Erasimus Saunders gent., his wife Jane, Chris- 
tofer Isam gentleman, his wife . . . ., Richard Batley gentle- 
man, his wife Anne, John Rynors (or Pynors) gentleman, Francis 
Thynn gentleman, and his wife Elizabeth, all nine of Clarkenwell co. 
Midd., for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common 
Prayer from the said i October 28 Elizabeth, to i January then next 
following. G. D. R., . . . .,29 Eliz. 

12 October, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Endfeild co. Midd., on view of the body of Alice White alias 
Bymes late of the said parish spinster : With Verdict of jurors, that on 
the loth inst. between the hours of nine and ten a.m. the said Alice 
was at a certain field called Nockholes, when she fell into dispute with 
a certain William Harlowe late of the said parish yoman, who, in 



l68 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

anger at her opprobrious speech to him picked up a hedge-stake, and 
striking her broke her skull with it, thereby giving her a mortal wound 
of which she died on the following day. — On his arraignment for thus 
slaying Alice White, William Harlowe asked for the book, read like a 
clerk, and was liberated according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 29 Ehz. 

28 October, 28 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Kyngeslande co. Midd., Robert Muffett late of the said parish laborer, 
stole and carried off four pieces of silver called " copens of silver," 
worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Lady the now 
Queen at Kingeslande, and that William Alsoppe late of London 
goldsmith, knowing him to have committed the said felony, received 
and comforted the said Robert on the 29th of October. — Also, True 
Bill, the same Robert Muffet, on the 6 September 28 Eliz., stole and 
carried off twenty pieces of silver called " coppens of silver " worth ten 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Queen Elizabeth, found at 
Kingesland co. Midd. aforesaid. — Both these bills are in G. D. R., 
7 Oct. 28 Eliz : — i.e. the roll of a Gaol Delivery that was held before 
the date assigned to the earlier of the felonies. 

2 November, 28 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Martin-in-the- Fields, on view of the body of 
John Mondaye late of the said parish gonnemaker, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that, on the ist inst. between the hours three and four 
p.m. Edward Palmer late of the said parish .... was at a certain 
place near the dwelling-house of his master, Matthew Clerck of the 
said parish, when there came thither the said John Mondaye, having 
in his right hand " quoddam tormentum de ferro vocatum a dagge 
. . . . being chardged with gonnepowder and twoe buUettes of 
lead," which dagge so loaded he placed upon the table ; and that 
Edward Palmer, unaware that the weapon was so loaded and having no 
intention to do harm to John Mondaye, took up the dagge in his right 
hand, and discharged it suddenly, thereby unintentionally shooting 
John Mondaye in the right side, and giving him a wound, of which 
he died on the following day. G. D. R., . . . ., 29 Eliz. 

16 December, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Woxbridge co. Midd., on view of the body of John Bradley 
late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
on the isth inst. between the hours nine and ten a.m., Richard 
Ba . . . gentleman, Richard Reynoldes yoman, William Atkyns 
yoman, Richard Atkyns yoman and Robert Ingledon of Woxbridge 
aforesaid miller, were fighting together in the highway at Woxbridge 
with swords and staves, when there came thither the aforesaid John 
Bradley in order to preserve the Queen's Peace, who forthwith closed 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 69 

in fight with the aforesaid Richard Atkyns ; and that Robert Ingledon 
aforesaid, seeing Richard Atkyns and John Bradley fighting together, 
struck John Bradley on his head with " a coulstaffe," thereby causing 
him to die instantly ; and that in so doing, the said Robert Ingledon 
murdered the said John Bradley. G. D. R., 29 Eliz. 

19 December, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition- post-mortem, 
taken in Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Robert Hall, late of 
London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being a prisoner 
in the said gaol, the said Roger died there by Divine Visitation of " the 
pining sickness,' on the i8th inst., after three weeks' illness. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 29 Eliz. 

22 December, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Whitechappell co. Midd., on view of the body of Roger 
Parkyns late of Burntewood co. Essex yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict of jurors, that Thomas Cocker, late of the same parish yoman, 
took from a certain table " quoddam tormentum de ferro vocat' a 
dagge .... chardged with gonnepowder and one bullett of lead," 
not knowing the dagge to be so charged ; and that without intending 
to do any-one any hurt, the same Thomas Cocker discharged the 
weapon on the 21st inst. between the hours two and three p.m. and 
accidentally shot Richard Parkyns in the throat, thereby causing him 
to die instantly. G. D. R. ,29 Eliz. 

29 December, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken in Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Isaack Brett, late of 
London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being a prisoner 
in the said gaol, the said Isaack Brett died there by Divine Visitation 
of "the pining sicknes" on the 28th inst, after seven days of illness. 
G. D. R., . . . .,29 Eliz. 

6 January, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Anthony Barker, 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being a 
prisoner in the said gaol, the said Anthony died there on the 5th inst. 
by Divine Visitation of " the Pining Sicknes," after five days' illness. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 29 Eliz. 

— January, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, on view of the body of 
Humfrey Burchall . . . ., then and there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, on 7 January, 29 Elizabeth, between the hours eight and 
nine a.m., the said Humfrey Burchall in the parish of St. Dunstan-in- 
le-West encountered Richard Sutton . . . . ; and that the two 
walked together holding speech with one another (insimul ambulave- 
runt pariter confabulantes) to a certain close in the same parish, where 
Richard Sutton threw his cloak, sword and buckler on the ground, and 



I/O MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

spoke words to which Humfrey Burchall replied by saying, " But I will 
fighte with thee " ; whereupon an affray was made between the two, 
Richard Sutton fighting with sword and buckler, whilst Humfrey 
Burchall fought with sword and dagger ; in which affray the said 
Richard Sutton with his sword gave the said Humfrey on the fore part 
of his neck a mortal blow, of which he died ; and that Richard Sutton 
thus slew Humfrey Burchall. — A memorandum, at the foot of the 
decayed and fragmentary bill, that at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate 
held on . . . ., Richard Sutton produced the Queen's pardon, 
and begged that it might be allowed to him. G. D. R., S April, 
29 Eliz. 

II January, 29 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of John Purffrey of Shewstock co. Warwick gentle- 
man in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Michaell Purffrey of 
Yslington co. Midd. yoman, in the sum of two hundred pounds; 
For the said Michael's appearance at the next- Gaol Delivery of New- 
gate. G. D. R., . . . .,29 Ehz. 

II January, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken in Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Henry Craushawe late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being a 
prisoner in the said gaol, the said Henry Craushawe died there by 
Divine Visitation of " the pininge sicknes," on the loth inst., after seven 
days' illness. G. D. R., 29 Eliz. 

16 January, 29 Elizabeth. — Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
the parish of St. Pancras, on view of the body of John Byttfield late 
of London gentleman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 
15 January 29 Eliz. between the hours seven and eight a.m., the 
said John Byttfield and a certain Josias Raynescrofte . . . ., 
met in a certain field within the said parish called Foordes Close, 
and that after parleying together they then and there drew forth 
their swords and daggers, and made an affray with one another, in 
which affray the aforesaid Josias Raynescrofte with his sword gave the 
said John Byttfield on the fore part of his body a mortal blow, of which 
the said John then and there instantly died. G. D. R., 5 April, 
29 Eliz. 

21 January, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Robert Ball of the 
parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields yoman, for not going to church, chapel 
or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 21 Jan. 29 Eliz. to 
5 April then next following. G. D. R., 28 April, 29 Eliz. 

25 January, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Thomas Pettye 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Thomas Pettye died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " the pin- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. I/I 

ing sicknes," after a fortnight's illness, on the 24th instant. G. D. R., 
5 April, 29 Eliz. 

7 February, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of John Hodges late 
of London yoman : With Verdict that the said John Hodges died in 
the said gaol by Divine Visitation of " the pining sicknes," on the 6th 
inst. G. D. R., 5 April, 29 Eliz. 

8 February, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Henry Tooly late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being within 
said prison, the said Henry Tooly fell ill of the " Pestilent Fever," and 
died of it after eight days of sickness, on the 6th inst. G, D. R.,. 
5 April, 29 Eliz. 

9 February, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Thomas Beacles late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said Thomas 
died in the said gaol by Divine Visitation of " the pining sicknes " on 
the 8th inst., after three weeks of illness. G. D. R., 5 April, 29 Eliz. 

17 March, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of March 
29 Eliz. John Welden late of Grais Inne Lane clerk, alias John Savell 
late of the same place clerk, being born within this kingdom of England 
after the Feast of the Nativity of John the Baptist i Eliz., and made 
and ordained a priest at .... in parts beyond sea by authority 
derived from the Roman See before the 14th day of March 29 Eliz., 
not considering the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, nor 
fearing in any degree the penalty in the same, on the aforesaid 17th of 
March 29 Eliz. was and remained traitorously and as a traitor at Grais 
Inne Lane aforesaid, in contempt of the same Queen her crown and 
dignity, and also against the statute in this case published and provided. 
Memorandum (in Latin) at the head of the bill, " He says that he is 
' Not Guilty,' but says that he does not wish to put himself npon the 
country, but wishes to be tried by clergy. Therefore let him go to 
punishment." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 30 Eliz. 

29 March, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Robert Wilford of 
Hoxton CO. Midd. esq. and his wife Mary, Edward Isam of Clarken- 
well gentleman, and Francis Yattes of Higate gentleman, for not going 
to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 29th 
March 29 EUz. to 3rd October then next following. — Also, in the same 
roll, similar True Bill against Katherine Bellamy wife of Richard 
Bellamy gentleman, Faith Bellamy spinster, Thomas Bellamy gentle- 
man, Joan Sheppard spinster, Thomas Abraham yoman, Richard 
Smithe yoman, all of Harrowe co. Midd., for not going to church, cha- 
pel or any usual place of Common Prayer from 6 June 29 Eliz. to 20th 



1/2 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

September then next following. — Also, in the same roll, similar True 
Bill against John Gardener of Westminster co. Midd. esq., for not 
going to any usual place of Common Prayer, from 28 June 29 Eliz. to 
I October then next following. — Also, in the same roll, a True Bill 
against Heither Stanlye of Islington co. Midd. gentleman and his wife 
the Lady Lucy Stanlye, Thomas Gawen of Islington gentleman, Francis 
Browne of Stepney gentleman, Anne Parker of Stepney spinster,, and 
Cicilia Leraplie of the same parish widow, for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 28 June, 29 Eliza- 
beth, to ist October, then next following. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 29 Eliz. 

17 April, 29 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Katherins co. 
Midd. on the said 17th April, Edward Haukyns late of London sailer 
stole a firkin of soap worth fifteen shillings, half-a-firkin of butter worth 
six shillings, two Holland cheeses worth three shillings, and a Suffolk 
cheese worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Valentyn. 
G. D. R., 28 April, 29 Eliz. 

22 April, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day in the 
high-way at Harnesey co. Midd., Edward Pygott late of London gentle- 
man assaulted John Robertes with the intention of robbing him, saying 
to him " Godes woundes delyver thy purse," and beating and maltreat- 
ing him so that his life was despaired of G. D. R., 28 April, 29 Eliz. 

27 April, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Alice Sare, there lying 
dead : With Verdict that the said Alice, being a prisoner within the 
gaol, died there on the 25th inst. by Divine Visitation of " the Pininge 
Sicknes " after four days of illness. G. D. R., 28 April, 29 Eliz. 

19 May, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said 29th of May, 
at the city of Westminster, Christofer Heyward of St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. clerk, fabricated and counterfeited falsely a certain 
obligatory writing, in the names of Robert Thompson and John Best, 
by which writing it was represented that the same Robert and John 
were bound to the aforesaid Christofer Heyward in the sum of twenty 
pounds under a certain condition set out on the back of the writing, 
and further put seals purporting to be the seals of the same Robert and 
John, whereas they never made, sealed or delivered the same writing. 
— At the bill's foot a memorandum that Christofer Haywarde acknow- 
ledged the writing, but that judgment was deferred because no mention 
was made of the day and place at which the seals were affixed to the 
spurious document. G. D. R., 22 Dec, 30 Eliz. 

21 May, 29 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Westminster, on view of the body of Launcelot Chichester late of 
the said city gentleman, there lying dead and killed : — The fragmentary 
parchment affording no particulars of the Verdict, save that on the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 73 

igth instant, the said Launcelot Chichester and a certain Henry Poore 
late of Westminster gentleman were together in a certain highway of 
the city, when . . . ." G. D. R., 30 Eliz. 

12 September, 29 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J. P., of Edmund Barton of the parish of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. "picture drawer"; For the said 
Edmund's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 29 Eliz. 

I October, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Andrew Mallerye 
esq. and William Hadnett yoman, both of Tottenam co. Midd. ; 
Francis Thinne of Clarkenwell gentleman ; Thomas Throgmorton esq., 
his wife Dorothy Throgmorton, and Thomas Palmer gentleman, all 
three of the parish of St. Andrew in Holborn, for not going to church, 
chapel, or any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said i October 
29 Eliz. to the ist day of April then next following. — Also, similar 
True Bill, in the same roll, against Katherine the wife of John Corne- 
well gentleman, Helen Leake spinster, Jane Leake spinster, all three 
of Edmonton ; Richard Ratley gentleman, Margery Tenoker (?) spin- 
ster, Charles Lecheworthe yoman, Katherine Hunter spinster, all four 
of Clarkenwell, for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer, 
from I October, 29 Elizabeth to the ist of April then next following. 
G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

6 October, 29 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Hewes yeoman, 
Roger Awstyne yeoman, Anthony Snapp yeoman, John Keyson yeoman, 
Roger Lyne gentleman, Robert Sutton yeoman, Thomas Leonarde 
yeoman, Lawrence Kellam yeoman, Thomas Capell yeoman, Thomas 
Edwardes yeoman, Thomas [? Owen] Fletcher yeoman, and Richard 
Johnson yeoman, all of Westminster, for not going to church, chapel 
or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 6 October 29 Elizabeth 
to 26 November then next following. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz. 

6 October, 29 Elizabeth. — Memorandum that, though proclama- 
tion was made at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate on i September last past, 
for Sir William Vauxe knt. alias William Lord Vauxe of Hackney co. 
Midd., Nicholas Lanckford of Fulham gentleman and his wife Martha, 
Anthony Brackenburie of Tottenham yoman, Mary Isam of Stepney 
widow, Richard Tremayne of Stepney gentleman and his wife Joan, 
Jane Tremayne of Stepney spinster, Julian Holcombe of Stepney 
spinster, Mary Tremaine of Stepney spinster, and William Gray of 
Stepney yoman, to surrender their bodies to the Sheriff of Middlesex 
at the next Gaol Delivery, which is this present Gaol Delivery, to 
answei: for their certain trespasses and contempts in not going to 
church &c., they, the said William &c. have not appeared at this Gaol 
Delivery ; Wherefore each of them is convicted of the aforesaid tres- 



174 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

passes and contempts, according to the form of the Statute in that case 
provided. G. D. R., 6 Oct, 29 Eliz. 

12 October, 29 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of William EUys, servant to Master Lyllie of St. 
Marys Lane, London, gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds ; for the 
said William's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, there and then 
to give evidence against John Abedherthe. G. D. R., . . . ., 
30 Eliz. 

I November, 29 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Jerom 
Hawley esq. J.P., of Walter Henley of New Inne co. Midd. gentleman, 
in the sum of ten pounds ; For his appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery to be held at Winchester co. Southamption, to give evidence 
against Henry Wigmore in respect to a certain felony, of which the 
said Henry is suspected and impeached. G. D. R., . . . ., 
30 Eliz. 

II November, 29 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Peter Denn of St. Sepulchre's London marchaunt- 
taylor, and Nicholas Allsopp of St. Leonard's Shoreditch merchaunt- 
taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and William Allsopp of St. 
Leonard's aforesaid goldsmith, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the 
said William Allsopp's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of New- 
gate, to answer to such things as may be objected against him. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz. 

25 November, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Hum- 
frey Smythe esq. J. P., of John Bodley of Whittington College mer- 
chant and Baptist Starre citizen and cooper of London, in the sum of 
ten pounds each, and William Pyke of Waverley co. Surrey gentleman, in 
the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said William Pyke's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace to be held within the county, then and 
there to answer to such things, as may be objected against him. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz. 

4 December, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fleetewood S.L., J. P., and Recorder of London, of Sir George 
Hannage of Haynton co. Lincoln knt., the Lady Alice Barkley of 
Highe Holbourue co. Midd. widow, Anne Nottingham of Highe- 
Holbourne widow, and Rose Nottingham of the same parish spynster, 
in the sum of forty pounds each ; For the good conduct, in all coming 
time, of the said Alice, Anne and Rose. G. D. R., 22 Dec, 
30 Eliz. 

5 December, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, Robert Browne, late 
of London yoman, on the said 5th of December at St. Johnstrete co. 
Midd. assaulted John Braye gent., he then being in God's and the Queen's 
Peace, and murdered him by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 175 

in the left side of his body, of which wound the same John Braye died 
on the 15th inst. — At the head of the bill, a memorandum that Robert 
Brown put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung ; but that 
he was respited after judgment by the Queen's command, certified by 
Sir F. Walsingham knt. G.D. R., 22 Dec, 30 Eliz. 

8 December, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Stephen Bull of Westham co. Essex yoman, in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of William Allsopp of St. 
Leonard's, Shoreditch, goldsmith, at the next Gaol Delivery, the said 
William undertaking to do his best in the mean time to produce the 
body of John Finder yoman. G. D. R., 22 Dec, 30 Eliz. 

11 December, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J.P., of John Marshe of the Inner Temple, 
London, gentleman, and Robert Danby of the parish of St. John 
Zachary London goldsmith, in the sura of twenty pounds each, and 
JuUus Marshe of Tottenham co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said Julius Marshe's appearance at the next Session 
of the Peace in the county. G. D. R., 22 Dec, 30 Eliz. 

16 December, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before William 
Fleetewood S.L., J. P. and Recorder of London, of William Skiddey of 
the Inner Temple gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds, for the 
appearance of Andrew Barrett at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. 
G. D. R., 22 Dec, 30 Ehz. 

12 January, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of Thomas Mountague of Southmimes co. Midd. 
vpholster, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Thomas Moun- 
tague's appearance at " the next Session," to give evidence against John 
Hunt and Elizabeth Harris. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz. 

16 January, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hanwell co. Midd., on view of the body of Agnes East, late 
of Hanwell . . . .; With Verdict that, on the isth instant 
between the hours eight and nine a.m., the said Agnes East and a 
certain John Pryor were together in a certain place called " the hall," 
within the dwelling-house of a certain Thomas Millet at Hanwell, when 
he struck her on the head with an axe, giving her a blow, of which 
she died immediately ; and that after so murdering her, John Pryor fled 
and made good his escape. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

12 February, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Eastsmythfeild co. Midd., on view of the body of Mathew 
Egers, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the loth inst. 
between the hours twelve and one p.m. of the same day, the said 
Mathew Egers and a certain Joyce Ov.en Howson alias Joyce Overs, 
late of . . . ., CO. Midd., was in a certain place called "the hall" 



176 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

within the dwelling-house of a certain Coone Johnson at Eastsmyth- 
field aforesaid brewer, when the said Joyce Overs assaulted the said 
Mathew Egers with a meat-knife, striking him therewith on the fore part 
of his body, and giving him a wound in the left side of his belly, of 
which wound he died on the following day. — On his arraignment Joyce 
Oven Howson alias Joyce Overs alias Joyce Overhowse put himself 
' Not Guilty ' of killing with aforethought, but Guilty of manslaughter ; 
when asking for the book, he received it and read it like a clerk. 
G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

7 March, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that William Goughe, late of 
Islington co. Midd. inholder, on the said day and at divers times 
before and afterwards, sold and uttered to divers persons unknown 
twenty gallons of Gascoyne wine at 2s. T,d. per gallon, and twenty 
gallons of sack at 3^. 4^. per gallon, being beyond the prices appointed 
and limited by the statute in that case provided. G. D. R., 19 April, 
30 Eliz. 

8 March, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Westminster, on view of the body of James Yonge, an infant of 
seven years, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 25 February 
30 Eliz. between the hours nine and ten a.m., the said James Yonge 
and a certain Margaret Yonge late of Westminster spinster, were to- 
gether within the dwelling-house of John Yonge the same James's father 
at Westminster, when the said Margaret assaulted the said James, and 
with both her hands took him and held him over a fierce fire burining 
up the chimney, and so held him for the space of a quarter of a 
half-hour, with the intention of killing and murdering the same James 
Yonge, whereby the " nates " and left " tibia " of the said James were 
much burnt ; from which burning he languished till the 6th instant, 
when he died ; and that in so dealing with the child the aforesaid 
Margaret murdered him. On her arraignment, Margaret Yonge put 
herself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 April, 
30 Eliz. 

18 March, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said 18th of 
March at Wliitechapple, Lion Aldworth late of London yoman stole a 
sword, worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Smythe. 
Putting himself ' Guilty ' of Petty Larciny, Lion Aldworth was tried by 
a Jury who appraised the sword at eleven pence half-penny. G. D. R., 
19 April, 30 Eliz. 

20 March, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Philip Baker of Step- 
ney CO. Midd. gentleman, Nicholas Lee of Clarkenwell gentleman, and 
Richard Palmer of Edmonton yoman, for not going to church, chapel 
or any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 20 March 30 Eliz. 
to the 17th of June then next following. G. D. R., . . ., 30 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 177 

30 March, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem 
taken at the parish of Stebunheth, on view of the body of Arthur 
Gardyner, late of London yoman : With Verdict that, on the 29th 
inst. between the hours nine and ten p.m., a certain Thomas Comes 
late of London yoman and a certain unknown person were together in 
a certain place called the Brickhills, within the field called Spittell 
FeiJd in the aforesaid parish, when they were joined by the said Arthur 
Gardyner and a certain Henry Gierke late of London shoemaker ; 
whereupon the aforesaid Thomas Comes with malice aforethought 
assaulted the same Arthur Gardyner, and with a sword gave him on the 
left side of his breast a blow, of which he instantly died. — At the foot 
of the bill, a memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery held on 16 Jan. 
31 Eliz. Thomas Comes put himself 'Not Guilty,' and was acquitted. 
G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

15 April, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Walter Hassellwricke, 
late of London yoman, stole a fetherbed worth forty shillings, " vnum 
straggulum voc' an Irish Caddo" worth twenty shillings, a blanket 
worth ten shilHngs, and " a pillowe of downe " worth nine shillings, of 
the goods and chattels of Robert, Earl of Essex, at Twickenham co. 
Midd. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz. 

27 April, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Strande co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Bradford late of London yoman stole and 
carried off " unam peciam argenti vocat' a spice box " worth four 
pounds, and a linen tablecloth worth six shillings, and a woollen cloak 
of " bricke collour " worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
John Carroll. — Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Bradford was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz. 

27 April, 30 Elizabeth.^— True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. 
during the night of the said 27th of April, Rowland Bellyn, and George. 
Bold, both late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwell- 
ing-house of Thomas Ardern esq. (Cecilia the wife of the same 
Thomas Ardern being then in the same house with her family then at 
rest), and stole therefrom " a cheyne of golde of small linckes '' worth 
twenty pounds, another gold chain worth twelve pounds, a pair of gold 
bracelettes worth nine pounds, thirty-two gold buttons worth six pounds, 
a pair of gold " tablettes " worth eight pounds, two gold rings set with 
" diamondes " worth seven pounds, another gold ring set with a " turkys " 
worth four pounds, " unum alium annulum vocat' an emerald " worth 
five pounds, twelve gold rings called " hoope ringes " worth six pounds, 
a jewel called " a border of perle " worth three pounds, a jewel of 
silver called " a bodkyn of silver " worth two shillings, twelve pieces of 
coined gold called " angelles " worth six pounds, one piece of coined 
gold called "a piece of xxxj-.," three pieces of coined gold called 

N 



178 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

" duble ducckettes " worth forty shillings, two pieces of coined gold 
called " Englisshe Crownes " worth ten shillings, one piece of coined gold 
called a " Frenche Crowne " worth six shillings, one piece of silk worth 
forty shillings, a silk purse worth twenty shiUings, of the goods, chattels 
and moneys of the said Thomas Ardern. Confessing the indictment, 
Rowland Bellyn was sentenced to be hung. Against George Bold's 
name appears the note "extra prison'." G. D. R., . . . , 
30 Eliz. 

28 April, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Robert Leadbeater 
yoman, Thomas Newberry ......... Thompson yoman, 

Richard Heyward yoman, and Francis Gravener cobler, all of West- 
minster, conspired together on 20 April 30 Eliz. to beat, wound and 
slay Richard Elye of Westminster gentleman, in consequence of which 
conspiracy the aforesaid Richard Heyward on the 28th of the said 
April assaulted the same Richard Elye with a drawn sword and 
would fain have killed him. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

I May, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill against George Stocker gentle- 
man, Godfrey Barton yoman, John WilHams yoman, and William 
Braye yoman, all of Westminster, for not going to cTiurch, chapel, 
or any other usual place of Common Prayer from x May 30 Eliza- 
beth to 20th July, then next following. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

3 June, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Giles's-without- 
Creplegate in London on the said day, Nicholas Sye with malice 
aforethought assaulted Thomas Daffye with a rapier, and murdered 
him by giving with that weapon a blow, of which he died instantly. 
G. D. R., . . . . 30 Eliz. 

19 June, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Isack Cockar late of Lon- 
don yoman, who in the said gaol died by Divine Visitation of " the 
bloody fluxe" on the i8th inst. after five days of illness. G. D. R., 
30 Eliz. 

20 June, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day and at 
divers times before and afterwards, John Barthelett of Heston co. 
Midd. was and still is a common disturber of the Queen's peace. 
G. D. R , 30 Eliz. 

24 June, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Isabell Springall late of 
London spinster : With Verdict that, being within the same gaol, the 
said Isabell died there by Divine Visitation of " the pining sicknes," on 

the day aforesaid after a fortnight's illness. G. D. R. , 

30 Eliz. 

29 June, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Whitechappell co. Midd., on view of the body of William Hudson, 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 79 

late of London yoman : With Verdict that, on the 27th inst. between 
the hours three and four p.m. the said William Hudson and a certain 
Richard Moore, late of London yoman, were together in Pattes Close 
near Mile-end in the aforesaid parish, when after parleying with one 
another, they drew forth their swords and daggers, and made an affray 
with one another, in which affray Richard Moore with his sword gave 
William Hudson on the fore part of his head a mortal wound, of which 
he then and there died instantly. At the bill's foot, a memorandum 
that on his arraignment for manslaughter Richard Moore confessed the 
indictment, asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered 
according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., . . . . Aug., 
30 Eliz. 

8 July, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Fynesbury on view of the body of Richard Ryce late of London 
yoman, there lying dead : With verdict that, on the 7th inst, William 
Pennington late of Sowthemymes co. Midd. yoman was walking from 
the dwelling-house of Henry Crompton at Shoreditche yoman to the 
house of Francis .... in St. Giles's-without-Creplegate tallow- 
chaundler, to do business with the said Francis, when he was assaulted 
by Richard Ryce and three unknown persons, who came upon him 
with their swords and daggers drawn, and before whom he retreated as 
far as the bridge called " Turned Pyke " within the said field, where 
the same William Pennyngton standing at a certain post called " the 
rayles " drew forth his sword and dagger and lawfully defended himself 
against his assailants ; and that in the aifray thus forced upon him, the 
same William Pennyngton in self-defence with his sword gave the said 
Richard a blow on his left thigh, of which he died then and there. 
G. D. R., . . . . Aug., 30 Eliz. 

3 August, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jerom 
Hawley esq. J. P., of John Pope, Robert Pennaril and William Russell, 
all three of Hyllingdon co. Midd. husbandmen, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each, and of Thomas Pope of the same parish in the sum of 
forty pounds ; For the said Thomas Pope's appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery after next Michaelmas, to answer respecting the man- 
slaughter of a certain William Hunte, of which he is suspected and 
impeached. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

8 August, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Fynnesberrie in the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., 
Thomas Johnson, late of London yoman, assaulted Gregory Porter and 
with malice aforethought slew and murdered the same Gregory Porter 
by giving him with a sword a wound under the left side of his breast, 
of which wound the same Gregory died instantly. In its original state 
the bill indicted John Tugge for being an accomplice in the felony, but 

N 2 



l80 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

marks on the bill show that the jury found no truth in the charges 
against him. Endorsement that the bill was taken by the Grand Jury 
at the Castle in St. Johnstreete : and enough remains of mutilated 
memorandum at the head of the much-defaced bill to show that on his 
arraignment Thomas Johnson pleaded his clergy, and that the book 
was given to him. G. D. R Aug., 30 Eliz. 

30 August, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Clarckston, 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, being a 
prisoner within the said gaol, John Clarckston died by Divine Visita- 
tion of " the pining sicknes " on the 29th inst., after seventeen days of 
illness. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

31 August, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Francis 
Flower esq. J.P., of Garret Tasker and Thomas Williams of St. 
Gregory's parish in London merchant-taylors, in the sum of forty 
pounds each ; For the appearance of John Norris of St. Olave's parish 
in London " master of fence," at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. 
G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

18 September, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that William Hartley late 
of Holborne co. Midd. clerk, alias William Garton late of the same 
place clerk, born within this kingdom of England after the Feast of 
the Nativity of St. John the Baptist i Eliz. and made and ordained a 
priest at Rheims (?) in parts beyond the sea by authority derived from 
the See of Rome before the loth day of September 30 EHz., in no 
degree regarding the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, 
nor having respect to the penalty contained in the same, on the i8th of 
the aforesaid December was and remained traitorously and as a traitor 
at Holborn aforesaid, in contempt of the said Queen's crown and 
dignity, and also against the form of the statute in this case pub- 
lished and provided. With this memorandum (in Latin) at the foot of 
the bill, — " And the aforesaid William Hartley put himself ' Guilty ' 
with no chattels. Therefore it was decreed that he be drawn on a 
hurdle to the place of execution, and there be hung by the neck, 
whilst still alive be laid upon the grown, his members be amputated, 
his entrails be drawn out of his belly, he being still alive, and be 
burnt, his head be cut off and his body divided into four parts, and 
his head and quarters be placed where the Lady the Queen has been 
pleased to appoint." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 30 Eliz. 

ig September, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Hum- 
frey Smythe esq. J. P., of George Wille servant of Robert Walter of 
Wimbledon co. Surrey esq., Morgan Price and Denis Castlan servant 
of the same Walter, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For their ap- 
pearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against Gabriel 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. l8l 

Lingar, charged with "robbing Mr. Walter's howse." G. D. R., 4 Oct., 

30 Eliz. 

22 September, 30 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, whereas William 
Tedder late of Westminster clerk, born after the Feast of the Nativity 
of St John the Baptist i Eliz., was made and ordained a priest before 
26 August 30 Eliz. by authority derived from the See of Rome, Doro- 
thea White spinster alias Dorothea White wife of Humfrey White of 
Westminster gentleman, moved by the devil's instigation, knowing that 
the said William Tedder was such a priest, received, comforted, aided 
and maintained him being at large and out of prison, against the form 
of the statute in this case published and provided, and against the 
Queen's peace, dignity and crown. Endorsement that the Bill was 
taken at St. John's Street on 4 October 30 Elizabeth, before Sir Owen 
Hopton knt. and four other Justices "ad audiendum et terminandum" 
by the oath of under-written jurors. At the foot of the bill, this memor- 
andum (in Latin),— "And the aforesaid Dorothea White put herself 
' Guilty,' with no chattels. Sentence that she be hung. And after- 
wards, that is to say, at the Gaol Delivery made here on the 4th day of 
. . . . 31 Eliz., the aforesaid Dorothea White produced the par- 
don of the Lady the Queen under the Great Seal of England, bearing 
date II July 31 Eliz., and prayed that it might be allowed to her." — A 
bill so defaced and mutilated as to be in places decypherable only with 
extreme difficulty. — G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 30 Eliz. 

29 September, 30 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jerom 
Hawley esq. J. P., of John Heyes of Waltham Holie Crosse co. Midd. 
yoman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Sissemore of South- 
warke co. Surrey clothworker, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the 
said John Sissemore's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of New- 
gate, to answer concerning a certain felony of which he is suspected. 
G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz. 

2 November, 30 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Westminster on view of the body of John Bannester late of 
Westminster yoman : With Verdict that the said John, being sick and 
weak, died on the ist inst. by Divine Visitation of a certain disease 
called " plurisey and inflamacon of the longes.'' G. D. R., 1 1 April, 

31 Eliz. 

26 November, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Alice Cutler wife of Anthony Cutler of 
Whitechappell alias Alice Cutler of Whitechappell spinster, exercised 
and practised certain detestable impious and devilish arts, called 
witchecraftes inchauntementes charm es and sorceries, against and upon 
a certain Sibilla Chappell daughter of William Chappell, with the 
intention of murdering her, from which detestable unholy and diaboli- 



1 82 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

cal arts the said Sibilla languished from the said 26 November 31 Eliz. 
to 21 March 31 Eliz., on which last-named day the said Sibilla died of 
the same detestable arts, and that, by so practising on the said Sibilla, 
the aforesaid Alice Cutler killed her. At the bill's head, the clerical 
memorandum, ' Po se nou cul nee rec' — Also another True Bill 
(with the same clerical note at its head) against the same Alice Cutler 
for practising the detestable and devilish arts of witchcraft in and upon 
Juliana Cooper, wife of John Cooper of Whitechappell baker, on 

I March 32 Eliz., " de quibus quidem detestabilibus nefariis et 
diabolicis artibus predicta Juliana Cooper die anno et loco predictis 
languescebat et valde infirma et debiUs in corpore suo devenit. Et sic 
ibidem languescens jacebat per spacium unius anni tunc proxime 
sequentis per quod ac racione et vigore predictorum detestabilium et 
diabolicarum artium per prefatam Aliciam Cutler predictis die anno et 
loco nequiter et diabolice exercitatarum et practicatarum in et super 
predictam Julianam Cooper, eadem Juliana Cooper valde vastata et 
consumpta fuit in corpore suo et adhuc est contra formam statuti in 
hujusmodi casu editi et provisi &c." G. D. R., 16 April, 33 Eliz. 

23 December, 31 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Katherin's co. Midd. on view of the body of James 
Gardyner late of the same place cutler : With Verdict that, on the 
22nd inst. between the hours nine and ten of the night of the said 
day, the said James Gardyner and a certain Richard Churche late of 
St. Katherine's aforesaid cutler were together in the " hall " of the 
dwelling-house of Cecilia Johnson of St. Katherin's aforesaid spynster, 
when Richard Church, unaware that the weapon was loaded, took up 
from a table " quoddam tormentum de ferro vocat' a gonne alias diet' 
a horseman's peace, being chardged with gonnepowder and one bullet 
of lead," and without intending to do ill to the said James or any other 
person discharged the gun and shot James Gardyner in the throat, so 
that he died instantly. G. D. R., 11 April, 31 Eliz. 

21 January, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Maribone co. Midd. 
on the said day, Charles Wrenne late of London gentleman assaulted 
Rpbert Ratclyff and with a sword gave him a mortal blow, of which he 
then and there died instantly. On his arraignment Charles Wrenne 
put himself ' Not Guilty ' of the felonious killing called " manslater," 
but ' Guilty ' of killing the said Robert in self-defence. And afterwards 
at the Gaol Delivery, made on 14 May 31 Eliz., he produced the 
Queen's pardon under the Great Seal of England, dated 3 May 
31 Eliz., and prayed that it might be allowed to him. G. D. R., 

II April, 31 Eliz. 

7 February, 31 Elizabeth.— -Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. John's-strete co. Midd. on view of the body of Nicholas 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS* ROLLS. ■ 1 83 

Fawcett, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 8th of January 
31 Eliz. between the hours two and three p.m., the said Nicholas 
Fawcett and a certain Sidrake Vere, late of London gentleman, were 
in St John's Strete "in publica platea ibidem" when they exchanged 
insulting words, and then drew forth their swords and daggers, and 
made an affray with one another, in which affray Sidrake Vere with 
his sword gave Nicholas Fawcett on the fore part of his breast a mortal 
blow, from which he languished till the 15th of the said January, when 
he died of it. — The unusual length of the time between the fatal 
result and the date of the inquest is noteworthy. G. D. R., 1 1 April, 
31 Eliz. 

II February, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Edward 
Fenner, S.L., J.R, of Elizabeth Glascoke in the sum of twenty pounds, 
and of Richard Ovenden of Lincolnes Jnn and Frauncis Kychen of 
Bromley co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the said 
Elizabeth's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer to such 
matters as may be then and there objected against her. G. D. R., 
II April, 31 Eliz. 

20 February, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J. P., of Sir Walter Lewsey of Lilisthill co. Sallop knt. and 
William Mere of Shewe Halles co. Shropsher esq. in the sum of one 
hundred pounds, and Jane Twogood gentellwoman, in the sum of two 
hundred pounds ; For the said Jane's appearance at the next Session 
at Guide Bayly. G. D. R., 11 April, 31 Eliz. 

21 February, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jo: 
Haynes esq. J. P. of Sir Walter Lewsy of Lilisthill co. Sallop knt. and 
William Mere of Shewe Halles co. Shropsher esq. in the sum of one 
hundred pounds each, and Griffen Evans and Marian Chaplin, in the 
sum of two hundred pounds each ; For the appearance of the said 
Griffen Evans and Marian Chaplin at the next Session at Quid Bayly. 
G. D. R., II April, 31 Eliz. 

23 February, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of Thomas Searle of Westminster yoman, in the sum 
of ten pounds ; For his appearance at the next Session to be held in 
Middlesex, to give evidence against Edward Graye, " for breakinge open 
a chest of the said Thomas Searle's one of the Queenes Ma*"^ Garde 
and taking certen thinges out of the same." G. S. P. R., Easter, 
31 Eliz. 

26 February, 31 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Maribone on view of the body of Robert Radclyff gentleman, 
there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 21 January 31 Elizabeth 
between the hours eleven and twelve a.m., Charles Wrenne late of 
Grayes Inn co. Midd. gentleman walked in the fields from Grayes Inne 



1 84 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

towards Maribone Parke ; that, on seeing this, the aforesaid Robert 
Radclyffe followed the said Charles Wrenne, and on the said Charles's 
return met him in a certain lane called "Lustie Lane alias Longe 
Lane " at Maribone, and there demanded of him a certain sum of ten 
pounds which he (the said Robert) pretended was owed to him by the 
same Charles ; that by reason of the controversy arising between them 
on this matter, Robert Radclyffe drew forth his sword and dagger and 
made an assault on Charles Wrenne, who for the preservation of his 
life drew forth his sword and dagger, as he endeavoured to withdraw from 
the same Robert ; and that in the ensuing affray, resolutely and violently 
forced upon him by his assailant, the said Charles Wrenne in self- 
defence with his sword gave Robert Radclyffe a mortal blow on the 
right breast, of which blow he then and there died instantly at Maribone 
Park. G. D. R., ii April, 31 Elizabeth. 

28 February, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of John Pellam of the parish of St. Butolp-without- 
Algate, London, vintner, in the sum of ten pounds ; For his appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex, to give 
evidence against Robert Pratt, who is suspected of " stealinge of a 
silver cuppe pryce vii nobles out of the howse of the said John 
Pellam." G. S. P. R., Easter, 31 Eliz. 

28 February, 3 1 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of Thomas Bay lie, servant of Ralphe Bay lie of the 
parish of St. Edmund in Lumbertstreete, London, vintner, in the sum 
of ten pounds ; For the said Thomas's appearance at the next Session 
of the Peace, to be held in Middlesex, to give evidence against Reginold 
Joneson, suspected " of stealinge a silver cuppe price iii li. out of the 
howse of the said Rauff Baylie." G. S. P. R., Easter, 31 Eliz. 

I March, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J. P., of John Robotham of St. James's-at-Garlikehive, 
London, clothworker, and William Wooddam of the same parish draper, 
in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Reginold Joneson of St. 
Giles's-without-Creplegate draper, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For 
the said Reginold's appearance at the next Session of the Peace 
to answer to a charge of " stealing a silver cuppe pryce iii li. out 
of the howse of John Pellam vintner." G. S. P. R., Easter, 
31 Eliz. 

4 March, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Ralph Winwood of Magdalen Colledge in " the 
city " of Oxford, in the sum of forty pounds ; For his appearance at 
the next General Session of Peace to be held in Middlesex, to give 
evidence against John Tannett. G. S. P. R., Easterj 31 Eliz. 

26 March, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Humfrey 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. l8$ 

Smythe esq. J.P., of George Hodges of St. Brigitt's parish in London 
gentleman, and Arthur Beeddell of Walthamstowe co. Essex gentleman, 
in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Robert Coppyn of Hogsdon 
CO. Midd. gentleman in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex, of the 
said Robert Coppyn, suspected " of beinge one of theym that robbed 
Mr. Herrickes man the Goldsmith in Cheape syde of xv'= " in cheanes 
precious stones and other juels in the Highwaye towardes Islington." 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 31 Ehz. 

26 March, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Islington co. Midd. on the said 26th of March, John Tannett late of 
London gentleman and William Sendye late of London gentleman, 
with swords and daggers assaulted, beat, and maltreated Roland Brede- 
ford, servant of Nicholas Herick of London goldsmith, and stole from 
him and carried away a jewel of gold with divers precious stones set 
therein, worth one hundred pounds ; another jewel of gold with divers 
precious stones viz. an agget and divers dyamondes and rubyes fixed 
therein, worth ninety pounds ; another jewel of gold with divers 
precious stones, worth one hundred and thirty pounds ; a gold chain 
•worth fifty-four pounds ; two gold rings with diamonds set in them, 
worth one hundred pounds ; and another chain of gold and pearls 
worth fifty pounds, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas Herick, then 
in the custody of Roland Bredeford. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' both 
gentlemen were sentenced to be hung. But at the Gaol Delivery of 
Newgate, made on 18 February 32 Eliz., William Sendye produced the 
Queen's pardon under the Great Seal, dated on 27 January 32 Eliz. 
— It was also found by the same bill that Richard Clarke, late of 
London goldsmith, was an accomplice in the felony before its com- 
mission, and at Islington on 25 March 31 EUz. incited John Tan- 
nett and William Sendye to perpetrate the aforesaid robbery. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Richard Clarke was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
II April, 31 Eliz. 

28 March, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Humfrey 
Smythe esq. J.P., of John Walters of St. Dunstain's-in-west London 
cutler, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said John's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex, to give 
evidence against Thomas Pryce, suspected " of stealing of a sworde 
out of Walter's shoppe pryce xxs." G. S. P. R., Easter, 31 Eliz. 

3 April, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Tannett late of London yoman stole two 
pieces of silver called " 3. bason " and an " ewer " worth twenty 
pounds, and six silver-gilt spoons, of the goods and chattels of Law- 
rence Humfrye. G. D. R., 11 April, 31 Eliz. 



1 86 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

10 April, 31 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, whereas John Eastery 
one of the constables of Hackeney co. Midd. yoman on the said 
loth of April, by virtue of a certain writ directed to him took the 
body of Thomas Denham of Hackeney in accordance with the form 
of the said warrant, the said Thomas unlawfully withdrew and 
rescued himself from the said John's custody. G. D. R., 14 May, 
31 Eliz. 

11 April, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at St. 
John's Streate co. Midd. Arthur Stanhope, late of London yoman, 
stole a leather purse worth a penny, and ten pence in numbered money, 
of the goods and chattels of Thomas Sheppard, secretly from the 
person of Elizabeth the wife of the same Thomas. Acknowledging the 
indictment, Arthur Stanhope was sentenced to be flogged. G. D. R., 
II April, 31 Eliz. 

12 April, 31 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Edward Grey late of London 
yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said Edward died 
within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " the pining sicknes," on the 
9th instant after six days' illness. G: D. R., 14 May, 31 Eliz. 

20 April, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day of April 
at the parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd., Lucas Hutton late of 
London gentleman, stole and carried off a stone jugge adorned with 
silver-gilt worth three pounds, three silver-gilt boxes called " boxes for 
surgeons " worth three pounds, and a wooden box ornamented with 
silver worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas 
Kellaway gentleman ; and that Thomas Dewe of St. Clement's-Danes 
yoman and his wife Alice on the 21st of the said April received and 
comforted the same Lucas, knowing him to have committed the same 
felony. G. D. R., 14 May, 31 Eliz. 

22 April, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Cooke esq. J. P., of George Russell of the parish of St. Clement 
Danes co. Midd. taylor, and Thomas Fortune of St. ButtoU's parish in 
the city of London " coatchmaker," in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of Rowland Heighington of the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Field 
yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Rowland's appear- 
ance at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer to such things as may be 
objected against him. G. D. R., 14 May, 31 Eliz. 

23 April, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Mau- 
chell esq. J. P., of Thomas Williames of the Inner Temple gentleman 
and William Halle of Highe Holborne taylor, in the sum of ten pounds 
each ; For the appearance of Simon Askewe gentleman at the next 
Session of the Peace held in the county, to answer to such things as 
may be objected against him, " vpon the complaint of the Constable of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 87 

Norton Folgate for frequenting suspected houses in that liberty." 
G. D. R., 14 May, 31 Eliz. 

26 April, 31 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before William 
Cooke esq. J.P., of Patricke Grante of Channell Rowe in the city of 
Westminster gentleman, Daniell Kelley of Westminster gentleman, in 
the sum of ten pounds each, and of Maurice Newegent, Irishman, in 
the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Maurice Newegent's appearance 
at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, then and there to answer to such 
things as may be objected against him. G. D. R., 14 May, 31 Eliz. 

17 May, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of William Pickeringe of St. Sepulchre's London 
barborsurgeon, and George Smith of Clerkenwell co. Midd. tailor, in 
the sum of twenty pounds each, and of William Daunsee of the city 
of Lymerick in Ireland gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds ; For 
the said William Daunsee's appearance at the next General Session of 
the Peace to be held in co. Midd., and in the mean time for his peace- 
ful bearing towards all persons, and more especially towards John 
Hardon and his wife Joan, and towards John Pugsley and his wife 
Agnes. G. S. P. R., Mich., 31 Eliz. 

2 July, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Sir John Arundell knt. 
and John Talbott esq., both of Clarkenwell ; George Hewett of St. 
Giles's-in-the-Fields yoman, Henry Leake of Eastesmythefelde gentle- 
man, Mathew Small of Paddingeton gentleman ; George Mackworth 
esq. and John Jones yoman, both of Harnesey co. Midd. ; the Lady 
Alice Barkeley of Holborne co Midd. widow, and Katherine Pyne of 
Whitechappell spinster, for not going to church, chapel or any usual 
place of Common Prayer, from 2 July 31 Eliz. to 28 Sept. then next 
following. G. D. R., 3 Oct, 31 Eliz. 

7 July, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day about ten a.m. 
at Joan Potteres (sic) in the parish of Enfeild co. Midd., Alicia Ward 
wife of Thomas Ward butcher, Margery Hunsdon wife of William 
Hunsdon yoman, Katherine Elborne wife of John Elborne laborer, 
Gertrenda Weston wife of Thomas Weston miller, Margaret Wigges 
wife of Robert Wigges laborer, Joan Thome wife of Henry Thome 
laborer, Alice Beckett wife of John Beckett laborer, Joan Lathbury' 
wife of Robert Lathbury myller, Elizabeth Cubley wife of Francis 
Cubley laborer, Agnes Wood widow, Alice Burrell wife of John Bur- 
rell maltman, Joan Abbott wife of Nicholas Abbott laborer, Joan 
Chapman wife of ... . Chapman maltman, Anne Turner 
widow, Agnes Bussher widow, Mary Cooke wife of Thomas Cooke 
shoemaker, Johanna Bazell a/ias Twigger wife of John Bazell laborer, 
Joan Sparke wife of Robert Sparke maltman, Elizabeth Beckett wife 
of Thomas Beckett laborer, Neele Harlowe wife of Luke Harlowe 



1 88 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

tanner, Alice Bates wife of William Bates jun. maltman, Mary Gyles 
spynster servant to John Bassett, Helen Page wife of William Page 
taillor, Jane Ryone wife of Robert Ryone junior maltman, Elizabeth 
Bozam wife of John Bozam paynter, Margaret Delowe spynster servant 
to William Randall, and Barbara John wife of John John, all of 
Enfeilde aforesaid, assembled themselves riotously and in warlike 
manner, being armed with swords, daggers, staves, knives and other 
weapons, and then and there maliciously injured and pluckt up a cer- 
tain fence of a certain close belonging to Alice Hayes widow, at Jone 
Potter {sic) aforesaid, to the grave injury of the said Alice Hayes. 
Endorsed " Apud Edmonton xxxi die Julii anno xxxi° EHz. Rne. coram 
Roberto Wrothe, Henr' Midlamoye, et Joh' Machell, ar. Justic' &c." 
G. D. R., . . . .,31 Eliz. 

26 July, 31 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Marybone co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Clarke late of London yoman assaulted 
Henry Oxon, and robbed him of a russett-coloured woollen cloak worth 
thirteen shillings and four pence and " vnum vestimentum vocat' a man- 
dilion " worth four shillings ; and that John Stevens late of Westminster 
yoman, John Lavys late of London yoman and William Pearson late of 
London yoman, knowing that he had perpetrated the said felony 
received and comforted the said Richard Clarke on 27 July 31 Eliz. 
Acknowledging the indictment, Richard Clarke asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the statute. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' William Pearson was discharged in consideration of 
Richard Clarke's benefit of clergy (per beneficium clericale principalis). 
John Stevens and John Lavys were at large. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 31 Eliz. 

9 September, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the night of the 
said 9th of September, Francis Blossom and Henry Robardes, both late 
of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of John 
Clarke of Highholborne, and stole therefrom nine yards of velvet 
worth nine pounds and ten shillings, certain pieces of silver lace worth 
forty shillings, and certain pieces of " silk and sylver frynge " worth 
twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Gilbert Talbott knt., 
Lord Talbott, at Higheholborne aforesaid. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 31 EHz. 

20 September, 31 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Marybone on the said day of September, John Hall, John Raven and 
John Skevington, all three late of London yomen, assaulted Thomas 
Powell and robbed him of a " pucke " colored woollen cloak worth 
thirty shillings, a sword worth nine shillings, a dagger worth three 
shillings, " unum fistulum argenti voc' a whissell ad valenciam xxx^.," 
and nine shillings in numbered money. On their arraignment all 
three prisoners put themselves ' Not Guilty,' and held to the declara- 
tion. G. D. R., 3 Oct., 31 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 189 

I October, 31 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood S.L. and Recorder of London, of Richard Kytchins of 
Cliffordes Inne gentleman and Humfrey Rowland of Easte Smyth- 
field horner, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Christofer 
Marley of London gentleman in the sum of forty pounds ; For the 
said Christofer's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 
3 Oct., 31 Eliz. 

8 October, 31 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Shepparton co. Midd. on view of the body of Robert 
Wroote .... there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Robert Wroote and a certain Robert Wigges, each being armed and 
fighting with sword and dagger, made on 3 September 31 Eliz. an 
affray with one another at Shepparton aforesaid, in which affray the 
said Robert received from his adversary's sword a mortal wound, of 
which he languished from the said 3rd of Sept. to the 24th of the same 
month when he died thereof — A fragmentary parchment. G. D. R., 
..... 31 Eliz. 

28 April, 32 Elizabeth, — True Bill that, at Shorediche co. Midd. 
on the said day, Morgan Dollinge late of London yoman stole " a 
foote-clothe of velvett " worth three pounds, six yards of velvet worth 
three pounds and ten shillings, four ells of the silk called Grene 
Taffatye worth thirty shillings, "a payer of pillowbers" worth ten 
shillings, a pair of sheets worth sixteen shillings, " a payer of pillowbers " 
worth eight shillings, and " tres pecias panni linei voc' three rotchett 
sleeves of Holland " worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
John, by divine permission Archbishop of Canterbury. At the bill's 
head a Memorandum that Morgan Dollinge put himself ' Guilty,' and 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 33 Eliz. 

II May, 32 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at .... on the 
said day, William Lawrence of the parish of St. Botulph-without- 
Aldrechgate of London gentlertian and . . . . " did drive a 
bargain and contract between Thomas Everinge of London gentleman 
and Nicholas Mylward of . . . ., whereby it was agreed that 
the said Nicholas should lend the said Thomas ten pounds at a rate 
of interest exceeding the lawful rate. — A bill so blackened and 
defaced by damp as to be illegible in material clauses. G. D. R., 
3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

30 July, 32 Elizabeth. — -True Bill that, on the said day in the 
dwelling-house of William Isloppe at Nortonfolgate co. Midd., Albert 
Atkynson of Seynt Marye-hill in London victeler, was guilty of 
adultery with Jane Isloppe, wife of the aforesaid William Isloppe. 
Putting himself 'Guilty,' Albert Atkynson was sentenced "to be 
carted." G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 



1 90 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

I October, 32 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Barram of 
St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. gentleman, John Haywood of the 
same parish gentleman, and James Grippes of Shorediche co. Midd. 
gentleman for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Com- 
mon Prayer, from the said i Oct. 32 Eliz. to the 4th of December 
then next following. G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 

6 October, 32 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Margaret Baxfeilde, 
Elizabeth Tatam, Christofer Rede, Thornas Thompson, Joan Parker, 
Amie Powell, Jenkin Evans, David Pryce, John Harris, Nicholas 
Malley, Nicholas Sherley, Rowland Williams, Lewis Stones, Richard 
Hasted, Henry Bisshoppe, Siderak Ellys, Joan Warde, John Hickes, 
John Jackeson, William Harrison alias Glasier, Evan Davies, John 
Phillippes, John Horseley, Robert Cooford, Edward Asheberrie, John 
Bowmaii, Edward Carre, Faith Grene, Sara Dobson, Agnes Marten, 
Joan Monninge, Argenta Robertes, Anne Catesbye, Elizabeth Foster, 
Joan Andrewes, Alice Parson, for being vagabonds on the said 6th of 
October at Acton co. Midd., and in divers other parts of the said 
county, over fourteen years of age, strong in body and fit for labour, 
but masterless and having no lawful means of livelihood, in contempt 
of the Lady the Queen, and against the form of the statute in this 
case provided : With sentence, that each of the said vagabonds should 
be severely flogged and burnt on the right ear (graviter flagelletur et 
cremetur in dextra auricula) according to the form of the statute. — 
Similar True Bill, with conviction and the same sentence, against 
William Robinson, Adam Smythe, Thomas Bowe, Thomas Cowper, 
John Dudley, Helen Beeche and Helen Wilson, for being vagabonds 
&c. on 15 October 32 Eliz. at Fulham co. Midd. and in divers other 
parts of the said county. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that 
Richard Grove of Bromeley co. Midd. milner took Adam Smythe into 
his service for an entire year, and bound himself in a sum of ten 
pounds, to keep the same Adam as his servant for the year, and at the 
end of the term to produce him at Session of the Peace, or then and 
there to produce good proof of his death. — Similar True Bill with the 
same judgment against Alice Walker, Henry Allen, Thomas Cleveley 
and Thomas Curtis, for being vagabonds &c. on 23 October 32 Elii. 
at Islingeton co. Midd. and at divers other parts of the same county. 
— Similar True Bill, with the same sentence, against Edward Thomp- 
son, William Barrett, Margaret Chapman, Thomas Corser and Timothy 
Garland, for being vagabonds &c. on 3 Oct. 32 Eliz., at Fulham 
CO. Midd. and. in divers other parts of the said county. — Similar 
True Bill, with the same sentence, against Nicholas Caxson, Mary 
Conquest, John Symes and Mary Parker, for being vagabonds &c., on 
6 November 32 Eliz., at Westminster co. Midd. and in divers other 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 19I 

places of the same county. — Similar True Bill, with the same sentence, 
against Edward Holmes, Cristofer Ellis, Maurice West, Francis Pigott^ 
Gracian Taylor, John Goodeman and Ambrose Byrde, for beiijg vaga- 
bonds on 9 November 32 Eliz. at Westminster co. Midd. and in 
divers other parts of the said county. — Similar True Bill, with convic- 
tion and tlie same sentence, against Henry Clyff, Elizabeth Browne- 
well, Stephen Morrys, Benedict Edwardes and William Thomas, for 
being vagabonds &c. on 21 November 33 Eliz. at Seynt Johns Strete 
CO. Midd. and divers other parts of the same county. — Similar True 
Bill, with the same sentence, against George Bates, Edward Miles and 
Andrew Hellvishe, for being vagabonds &c. on 14 December 33 Eliz. 
at Maribone co. Midd., and in divers other parts of the same county. — 
Preserved on the same file with documents relating to them, and apart 
from other sessional matters, these eight bills are in a wrapper, 
endorsed " Di'v's' Session' Pacis tent' apud le Castell in Seint Jon- 
streete in p'dco Com' Midd pro punic'on' vagabund' .... 
annis regni Regine Elizabeth xxxii & xxxiii." — Hence it appears 
that in the ten weeks between 6 Oct. 32 Eliz. and 14 Dec. 33 Eliz. 
7 1 persons, male or female, and aged fourteen or upwards, were sen- 
tenced to be severely whipt and branded with a hot iron for being 
masterless vagrants in the county : — viz. rather more than seven a 
week. 

22 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before George 
Assheby esq. J.P., of Jerom Peter of Westminster yeoman and Thomas 
Roberts of Westminster cooke, in the sum of five pounds each, and 
Ingram Willis alias Willon of the same city ' singingman ' ; For the 
said Ingram's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, 
and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all people, and 
especially towards Simon Benbow of Westminster tailor. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 33 Eliz. 

20 December, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Arrundell of 
Clarkenwell co. Midd. esq. for not going to church, chapel or any usual 
place of Common Prayer, from the said 20 Dec. 33 Eliz. to 31 Dec. 
34 Eliz. G. D. R., . . . ., 34 Eliz. 

4 February, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hyghegate co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Halle late of London yoman stole a black 
velvet cloak " faced with shagge silke " worth five pounds, a " blake silke 
grograne " cloak " lyned with Tafifatye " worth four pounds, a pair of 
satin breeches of " seawater grene " color worth thirty shillings, a 
beaver hat worth twenty shillings, and " vnum frenum velvetti voc' a 
bridle of velvett " worth ten shillings, and " a velvett jerkyn " worth forty 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Evered Dygbye^ esq., found at 
Hyghegate. At the head of the bill a memorandum that John Halle 



192 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

put himself ' Not Guilty,' but was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 33 Eliz. 

22 February, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day in a 
certain field in St. Leonard's parish in Shorediche co. Midd., George 
Crosse late of London shoemaker, assaulted one Leonard Lyster, then 
being in God's and the Queen's peace, and with a " pycked stafe " 
gave the said Leonard a mortal blow under the right eye, of which 
blow he died on the 25th of the same February; and that in so 
doing George Crosse murdered Leonard Lyster. G. D. R., 19 May, 
33 Eliz. 

II March, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Walter 
Wotton esq. J. P., of John Kychen of Totridge co. Midd. gentleman, 
Anthony Kychen of Barnardes Inn gentleman, and James Kychen of 
the same Inn, gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and 
of Richard Mouse of Wylsdon co. Midd. carter, in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said Richard Mouse's appearance at the next Session 
to be held in Midd., for an enquiry concerning a riotous and unlawful 
assembly made by the same Richard at Holloway in the parish of 
Islington. — -With similar recognizances, for the appearance of Edward 
Payne of St. Geiles co. Midd. carter, Thomas Herytage of Harrowe 
CO. Midd. carter, William Symson of Eastsmithfylde in London carter, 
John Major of Eastsmithfylde carter, Henry Brocken of Eastsmythfyld 
carter, Walter Barley of Islyngton carter, Thomas Hall of Sylney Streat 
carter, Henry Atkinges of Islington carter, John Kychen of Tottridge 
aforesaid gentleman, Anthony Kychen of Barnard's Inne gentleman, 
James Kychen of Barnards Inn gentleman, Thomas Bynfyld of Isling- 
ton inholder, John Craven of Hollaway yoman, Henry Hatton of St. 
Martyn's-in-the-fields carter, Peter Gardner of St. Geiles's co. Midd. 
carter, William Osborne of St. Gregories London carter, John Dicking- 
son of Barnardes Inne yoman, Robert Myllington of Totridge laborer, 
Edward Conkes of Totridge yeoman, Robert Clarke of Hollaway 
husbandman, .... Thompson of Hollaway husbandman, at 
the next Session in co. Midd. for an enquiry respecting the same riot- 
ous assembly made at Hollaway by the persons thus put under bonds. 
G. S. P. R, Easter, 33 Eliz. 

20 March, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmylstrete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Arnold late of London spinster, stole 
an imbossed ring worth forty shillings, " a ronn hollowe ringe with a 
whissell " worth forty shillings, a " Turkys ring," worth twenty shillings, 
a " ringe with a pearle in yt " worth twenty shillings, " a foldinge ringe " 
worth thirteen shillings and four pence, a " blacke enameld ringe " 
worth six shillings and eightpence, together with divers articles of 
wearing apparel, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Collier of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 193 

Turmylstrete aforesaid gentleman ; and that Elizabeth Hawtrey, wife of 
James Hawtrey of Turmylstrete yoman, knowing her to have com- 
mitted the said felony, feloniously received and comforted the said 
Elizabeth Arnold on 21 March 33 Eliz.— Also, another True Bill that, 
at Lymehouse co. Midd. on i April 33 Eliz., Elizabeth Arnold late of 
London spinster, stole three " sylver whistells" worth five pounds, seven 
silver spoons worth forty shillings, two gold rings, set with rubies worth 
three pounds, "a gold ringe with an emerald" worth five pounds, 
together with other articles of jewellery &c., and seven pounds in num- 
bered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of John Smythe at 
Lymehouse ; and that Elizabeth Jonson late of Westminster spinster, 
knowing her to have committed the said felony, feloniously received and 
comforted the said Elizabeth Arnold, on 2 April 33 Eliz. — On each 
bill appears a clerical memorandum, that Elizabeth Arnold acknow- 
ledged the indictment and pleaded pregnancy, was found ' Not Pregnant ' 
by a jury of matrons, and was therefore sentenced to be hung. From 
memoranda on the bills it also appears that Elizabeth Hawtrey put her- 
self ' Guilty,' pleaded pregnancy, was found by examination ' Not Preg- 
nant,' and was sentenced to be hung ; and that Elizabeth Jonson put her- 
self ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 April, 33 EHz. 

3 April, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the said 
day, Edmund Chapman late of the said city yoman, assaulted Agnes 
Gravener, a child of nine years, " et ipsam Agnetem tunc et ibidem 
felonice rapuit et defloravit." — At the head of the bill, a memorandum 
that Edmund Chapman put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 16 April, 33 Eliz. 

14 April, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir Owin 

Hopton knt., J.P., of William Skelton of Chaulton co yoman, 

in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said William's appearance at the 
next Session of the Peace to be held in Midd., to give evidence against 
Nicholas Wenlock. G. D. R., 16 April, 33 Eliz. 

14 April, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisiiion-post-mortem, taken 
at Lymehouse in Stepney co. Midd. on view of the body of Edward 
Glasse, there lying dead and killed : With Verdict, the said Edward 
Glasse on the 13th (?) inst. made an affray with a certain Thomas 
Androwes late of London gentleman, who had been appointed by 
Thomas Cavendishe esq. "the steward overseer and paymaster" of 
certain workmen doing divers things needful for the fitting out of the 
ships of the same Thomas Cavendishe, and that in the affray the said 
Thomas Androwes in self-defence killed the said Edward Glasse by 
giving him a blow, of which he died in a quarter-of-an-hour. — This 
parchment is so defaced and fragmentary as to afford few other par- 
ticulars of the fray. G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 

o 



194 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

i6 April, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Meridithe ap Davy, late of 
London yoman, who died within the said gaol on the 15th inst, by 
Divine Visitation of " the Pininge Sicknes," after seven days' illness. 
G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Ehz. 

18 April, 33 Elizabeth,— True Bill that, on the said day at West- 
minster, viz. in the Church of the College of St. Peter of Westminster, 
William Dethick, Garter Chief King of English Arms, assaulted and 
made an affray on Henry Browne gentleman then and there being in 
God's and the Queen's peace, and then and there maliciously drew 
from its sheath a dagger, with the intention of striking the aforesaid 
Henry Browne with the same weapon, and further that the said William 
Dethick with the said dagger then and there struck the said Henry 
Browne on the left part of his head. At the head of the bill a memo- 
randum, that Garter King put himself ' Not Guilty ' and was acquitted. 
— Also, on the same file, True Bill that William Hammon of St. Peter's- 
ad-vincula within the Tower of London gunner, Francis Farton of the 
same parish gunner, and Robert Evelyn of St. Peter's parish in Corne- 
hill, London, powder-maker, on 3 May 33 Eliz. stole twenty-three 
barrels of gunpowder, worth ^£92, of the goods and chattels of the said 
Queen, then and there found at the Tower of London. On the head 
of the bill a memorandum that on their arraignment William Hammon 
and Robert Evelyn put themselves ' Not Guilty,' and held to the 
declaration ; and that Francis Parton was out of prison. These bills 
and other documents touching the two matters are on a separate file, 
in a wrapper endorsed " vii August! xxxiii"° R. Eliz. — Session Pads tent. 

apud le Castell in Seint John's Street &c coram Owine 

Hopton milite et William Fletewood Seruien' ad legem ac Recordatore 
Ciuit' London Justic' &c. S. S. O. T., 7 Aug., 33 Eliz. • 

20 April, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. Clement- 
Danes without the bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on the said day, 
William Nevell late of London gentleman stole a willowe-coler satten 
doublet and a pair of willowe-coler silk breeches worth twenty-four pounds, 
two pairs of silk stockins worth four pounds, a dagger worth five shillings, 
and a linen " indusium " worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Thomas Vavesey esq. ; and that .... Hutchinson, late of the 
same parish gentleman, knowing him to have perpetrated the said 
felony, received, aided and comforted the same William Nevell on the 
2 1 St of the said April, at the said parish. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

24 April, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherine's parish 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Nicholas Flewellyn late of London 
yoman stole a silver cup called " a Taverne Cuppe " worth forty-five 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas Hyckes ; and that 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 195 

Robert Alwinkle, late of St. Katherine's aforesaid goldsmyth, after the 
commission of the said felony, feloniously received and comforted the 
said Nicholas. G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 

2 May, 33 Elizabeth.- — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Withers late of 
London yoman, who died on the ist inst. within the said gaol-by 
Divine Visitation of "the pining sicknes," after a month's illness. 
G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 

6 May, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seynt Johns Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Robert Phillippes, Stephen Bower, Nicholas 
Garrard and John KnoUes, all late of London yomen, stole "a nether 
part of a gowne of figured satten " worth twenty-two pounds, " a nether 
parte of a gowne of black satten " worth eleven pounds, " a kyrtle of 
purple cloth of golde " and a " stomager of clothe of gold " worth 
eleven pounds, "a kyrtle of clothe of sylver" and "a stomager of 
cloth of silver " worth ten pounds, " a payer of silke stockinges 
collo'. sea-grene" worth thirty-five shillings, " vnum par' calligarum 
sereci colar' watched" worth thirty-five shillings, a velvet zone 
" imbrodered with pearle " worth twenty-nine shillings and sixpence, 
a velvet zone " sett with buttons of golde and pearle " worth fifty- 
nine shillings, a chain of gold " sett with pearle " worth sixty pounds 
and nineteen shillings, and " a payer of braslettes of golde " worth 
eleven pounds and four shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir 
Nicholas Le Strange knt. at Seint John's Strete aforesaid. — Over the 
name of each of the thieves there appears in the bill the clerical 
memorandum " extra p'son." The thieves were at large. G. D. R., 
19 May, 33 Eliz. 

II May, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at Isling- 
co. Midd. in the presence and hearing of divers of the Queen's faithful 
subjects, Nicholas Haselwood of Islington aforesaid yoman spoke with 
malice and feloniously against the same excellent Queen, saying that 
he desired and wished her death, and further " That he hoped to see 
his enemyes burnt in Smythefeild before Michaelmas." At the bill's 
head a memorandum, that on his arraignment Nicholas Haselwood 
put himself ' Not Guilty ' of felony, but ' Guilty ' of trespass and 
contempt, and that he was sentenced to be put on the pillory (Ideo 
ponetur {sic\ super collistrigium), with a paper setting forth his offence 
over his head. G. D. R., 19 May, 33 Eliz. 

14 May, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Elizabeth Woodward alias 
Woolward, who died within the gaol on the 3rd inst by Divine Visitation 
of "thepininge sicknes," after eight months' illness. G. D. R., 19 May, 
33 Eliz. 

2 



196 MIDDLESKX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

6 June, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Elizabeth Chaundeler 
of Hoggelane in Whitechappel spinster, Anne Drurye of Popler 
widow, Katherine Inwayne of Whitechappel widow, and William 
Mompesson of Clarkenwell, gentleman, for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 6 June 
33 Eliz. to 26 Sept. then next following.— Also, on the same file, 
similar True Bill against Abraham Pulberrie of St. Leonard's parish in 
Shorditche gentleman and his wife Joan, for not going to any usual 
place of Common Prayer, from i June 33 Eliz. to 27 Sept. then next 
following, — Also, on the same file, similar True Bill against John 
Wilkinson of St. James's parish in Clarkenwell yoman, for not going 
to any usual place of Common Prayer from 20 November 33 Eliz. to 
28 Sept. then next following. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 33 Eliz. 

20 June, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Enfeilde co. Midd., Eleanor Trevener of the said parish spinster, not 
having the fear of God before her eyes, but moved and seduced by 
the devil's instigation, and her own malice aforethought, gave and 
offered to her mistress, Susanna Jackson, a certain dish filled with 
pieces and mixed with a certain poison called ratesbane, with the 
intention of killing and murdering the aforesaid Susanna Jackson ; 
which same Susanna Jackson immediately after the taking of the same 
mixture (post receptionem intoxicac'onis) became languid and feeble 
in her body and still remains in great peril of her life. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 33 Eliz. 

6 July, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on 
the said day, Philip Kempe and Henry Battersbye, both late of 
London yomen, stole secretly from the person of Frances Chace a 
leather purse worth sixpence and five shillings of numbered money in 
the same purse, of the goods, chattels and moneys of her hus- 
band, Henry Chace. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' both thieves 
were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 27 August, 33 Eliz. 

7 July, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Greyse Inne Lane co 
Midd. on the said day, John Mathewe late of London yoman 
assaulted Thomas Owen, and murdered him by giving him with a sword 
a fatal wound, of which he languished from the said 7 July 33 Eliz. to 
24 August then next following, when he died thereof. Putting himself 
' Not Guilty ' of murder, but ' Guilty ' of manslaughter, John Mathewe 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R ,35 Eliz. 

17 July, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Younge, esq. J. P., of John Farrar of the parish of St. George in 
Botulph Lane in London haberdasher and John Farrar of the 
same parish husbandman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of 
Edward Shelley of Charterhouse Lane tailor, in the sum of twenty 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 1 9/ 

pounds; For the said Edward Shelley's appearance at the next 
Session of the Peace, to be held in Midd. co. G. D. R., 27 August, 
33 Eliz. 

25 July, 33 Elizabeth. ^True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. 
on the said day Stephen Trefulack late of London gentleman, 
exercised and practised certain wicked detestable and diabolical artes 
called "wytchecfaftes inchauntementes charmes and sorceryes'' wickedly 
and diabolically, with the intention of provoking George Southcott 
gentleman to unlawful love of a certain Elianore Thursbye. At the 
foot of the bill a memorandum that Stephen Trefulack put himself 
' Guilty ' ; that judgment was deferred by the Court ; and that after- 
wards at the Gaol Delivery of 3 December 34 Eliz. it was ordered by 
the Court that he should have the penalty of the statCite. G. D. R., 
7 Oct., 33 Eliz. 

31 July, 33 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. 
on the said day, Mary Hill wife of William Hill of the said parish 
baker murdered Alcibiades Sutton, an infant of the age of half-a-year, 
by putting a linen cloth over his mouth and so suffocating him. Po 
se non cul nee rec. G. D. R., .... 34 Ehz. 

7 August, 33 Elizabeth. — Precept of " Venire Facias," running 
in the Queen's name, directed to the Sheriff of Middlesex ; For the 
immediate appearance before Her Justices of the Peace and of Oyer 
and Terminer at the Castle in St. John's Strete, of twelve free and 
loyal men of the view of the City of Westminster, to ascertain and 
declare upon their oath whether William Dethick, Garter King of 
Arms (Garter principalis Rex Armorum Anglicorum) late of London 
esq. is guilty or not of certain transgressions and contempts of which 
he is indicted. Testibus Owino Hopton milite, et Willo' Fletewood 
S.L. &c. — Also, on the same file, a similar precept of " Venire Facias," 
for twelve free and loyal men of the view of the parish of St. Peter-ad- 
vincula within the Tower of London, to ascertain and declare whether 
William Hamon of the said parish gunner and Robert Evelyn of St. 
Peter's Cornhill in London powder-maker or either of them be guilty 
or not of a certain felony of which they are indicted. Testibus Owino 
Hopton, milite, et Willo' Pleetewood s'vien ad legem.- S. S. O. T-, 
7 Aug., 33 Eliz. 

12 August, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fleetwoode, S.L., J. P., and Recorder of London, of John Bridges of 
Westminster brewer, in the sum of five pounds ; For the said John's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against William 
Martin " for stealinge of xxx sackes and ix barres of yron owte of 
the CoUedge of Westminster." G. D. R., 27 August, 33 Eliz. 

27 August, 33 Elizabeth. — Memorandum, that proclamation 



1 98 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

having been made at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate on 30 June last past, 
that George Gataker of Islingeton co. Midd. should surrender his body 
to the Sheriff of Midd. before the next Gaol Delivery, which is this Gaol 
Delivery, to answer for certain trespasses and contempts in not going to 
church, of which he was then indicted, the aforesaid George Gataker 
failed to appear at this Gaol Delivery, and is therefore convicted of the 
same trespasses and contempts. G. D. R., 27 August, 33 Eliz. 

28 August, 33 Elizabeth. —Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Norton Folgate co. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas 
Bardesley late of London yoraan, there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the said Thomas came by his death from an affray, begun and moved 
by him and a certain unknown person at Norton Folgate aforesaid, 
between the hours ten and eleven of the 21st inst., against a certain 
James Browne vintner and Francis Mason yoman, of the same parish, 
in which affray, Francis Mason with "abrowne bill." gave the said 
Thomas Bardesley on the fore part of his head a mortal wound, of 
which he died on the 27th inst. ; and that the said James Browne was 
present at the affray with his sword drawn, and aided and encouraged 
the said Francis Mason to commit the said felony. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 

33 Eliz- 

31 August, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Francis Grene of St. 

Martin's-in-the-fields co. Midd. gentleman and Thomas Smythe of St. 
Clement's-Danes co. Midd. gentleman, for not going to church, chapel 
or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 31 Aug. 33 Eliz. to 
31 March then next following. — Also, similar True Bill against Lucy 
Smythe spinster and Elizabeth Sheppie widow, both of St. Clement's- 
Danes aforesaid; Jane wife of WilUam Shelley of Holbourne co. 
Midd. esq. ; Francisca wife of Ferdinand Bawde gentleman, and 
Francis Bastard gentleman, both of Stokenewington co. Midd. ; William 
Weston of Clarkenwell gentleman, and John Bastard yoman and 
servant of the same William Weston ; Ferdinand Bawde gentleman 
and Elizabeth Button spinster, both of Stokenewington ; Mary wife of 
WiUiam Cole of St. Giles's-in-the- Fields gentleman; Elizabeth 
of Clarkenwell widow ; Elizabeth Allen of Stokenewing- 
ton spinster ; William Thorosberrie of Nortonfollgate yoman and 
Stephen Vaughan of the same parish esq. ; Thomas Sleepe of Clarken- 
well yoman and his wife Katherine ; William Charnocke of Holborne 
gentleman ; William Burde of Harlingetqn gentleman ; Mary Grene 
daughter of Norton Grene of Islingeton gentleman ; Colletta Pottenger 
of Islingeton spinster ; Mary Copley of Holborne spinster; Dorothy 
Woodeward of the same parish spinster; James Laweles of St. 
Katherin's gentleman ; Robert Willes of Harrowe yoman ; and William 
Pryce of Holborne yoman, for not attending any usual place of Com- 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. I99 

mon Prayer from 20 Dec. 34 Eliz. to the last day of March then next 
following. G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

7 October, 33 Elizabeth — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of ... . Glinn of the parish of St. Botolph- 
without-Bushopsgate gowldsmith, in the sum of ten pounds, and Richard 
Bromley of Clerkenwell glover, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the 
said Richard Bromley's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer 
all such things as may be objected against him. 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

13 October, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of William Johnson St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. 
tailor and William Starkye of St. Dunstan's " in le West London " 
cordwayner, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Edward Parre 
of the parish of Prescott co. Lancastre gentleman, in the sum of forty 
pounds ; For the said Edward Parr's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery for Middlesex. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

20 October, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edelmeton co. Midd. 
on the said day, in violation and contempt of a certain statute of 
4 & 5 Philip and Mary, Richard Lylliard laborer and Anthony Walden 
needleman (sutor vestiarius) took possession of a certain Mary Burton, 
one of the daughters of Launcelot Burton druggist deceased, she being 
thirteen years of age, and the said Launcelot having by his testament and 
last will given and bequeathed for her advantage and marriage-portion the 
sum of thirty pounds, and also by his said testament and last will in 
lawful manner entrusted her education and government to a certain 
Briget, now the wife of John Ayshe of East Barnet co. Hartford gen- 
tleman ; and that in so doing the said Richard Lylliard and Anthony 
Walden, being over fourteen years of age, withdrew the said Mary 
from the possession of the said John and Briget, against their will. 
G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

23 October, 33 Elizabeth.— Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at 
Tuthellstrete in St. Margaret's parish in Westminster, on view of the 
body of Robert Crosyer late of Westminster yoman, there lying dead : 
With Verdict that, on the 22nd inst. between the hours two and three 
p.m., John Keckham late of the said parish was going in the public 
way of the said street to the Gatehouse on the business of Margaret 
Braye widow, his mistress, when the said Robert Crosyer, on his way 
to the Gatehouse from another part of " the place," crossed over the 
same place to encounter John Keckham, and assaulted him with a 
Cowle Staffe, beating wounding and striking him down with the inten- 
tion of slaying him, whereupon the said John lying on the ground and 
seeing that his life was in danger then and there with a drawn rapier 
which he had in his hand defended himself against the said Robert 
Crosier; and so lying on the ground, because he could not arise by 



200 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

reason of the violence of his adversary's assault, John Keckham in lawful 
self-defence and for the preservation of his life with his sword gave 
Robert Crosyer under the left side of his breast a mortal wound, of 
which he died on the following day of the present month. G. D. R., 
3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

28 October, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the parish of St. Clement-Danes without the bar of the New Temple 
CO. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Wrighte late of London 
taylor, there lying dead : With Verdict that Humfrey Williams late of 
London yoman and the said Thomas Wrighte spoke insultingly to one 
another in the dwelling-house of William Redishe in the said parish, 
on the 26th inst., and that afterwards, between the hours seven and 
eight p.m. of the night of the same day, the said Thomas came upon 
the same Humfrey in a certain place in the same parish, and then and 
there assaulting him beat him and broke his head with a faggott-sticke ; 
whereupon the same Humfrey with a knive gave the same Thomas in 
the left groyne a mortal wound, of which he died on the 28th inst., and 
that in so doing Humfrey killed and slew Thomas Wrighte feloniously. 
On his arraignment for manslaughter Humfrey Williams acknowledged 
the indictment, asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered 
in accordance with the Statute. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

28 OctoBER, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of Laurence Gillman of Stanford-le-Hope co. Essex 
maryner and George Harrison of St. Dunstan's " in le Easte London " 
maryner, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and of Peter Bartil- 
mew of Stanford aforesaid maryner, in the sum of two hundred marks ; 
For the said Peter's appearance at the next Session of Gaol Delivery 
for Middlesex. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

4 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Clement's Danes without the bar of the Nevif Temple co. 
Midd., on view of the body of Thomas Coxon, then and there lying 
dead : With Verdict that, on the 2nd inst. between the hours nine and 
ten a.m. the aforesaid Thomas Coxon and a certain Daniell Carter 
late of Westminster yeoman were about to go together between " the 
twoe gates" near Whitehall, when Thomas Coxon assaulted Daniell 
Carter violently, giving him on the face several wounds with a dag- 
ger, whereupon Daniel Carter said " What meanest thou to strike 
me ? I have nothinge to doe with thee," and did his utmost to 
withdraw from the same Thomas, and whilst followed by his assail- 
ant with a drawn sword did retreat before him to the angle of a 
wall beyond which he could not go ; and that after receiving divers 
wounds from his enemy, Daniel Carter in self defence drew his sword, 
when Thomas Coxon ran in upon the point of Daniel's sword and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 20I 

so, against the same Daniel's wish, received in the left part of his 
body a mortal blow, of which he died on the 3rd inst. — Thomas's 
surname is spelt Croxon as often as Coxon in this prolix writing. 
G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

5 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Pynwell of Yslington co. Midd. musician 
(musicus) and John Palmer of the same place tailor, in the sum of ten 
pounds, and of Walter Stables of the same place tailor, in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said Walter's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

7 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Hawtrey esq. J. P., of John Wyngester and John Redinge of Ryslipe 
CO. Midd. " yeraen " and Richard Upton of the same parish joyner, in 
the sum of ten pounds each ; For their appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery for co. Midd. to give evidence against Richard Collyns, a 
vagrant, " charged with felonies and traytorous counterfeitinge of the 
Quenes Majesties coyne called a syxpence." G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

7 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood S.L. and Recorder of London, of John Dra water of Black- 
friers mercer and Richard Tysdale of Goldingelane farrier, in the sum 
of ten pounds, and John Lucas of St. Giles's parish silkweaver, in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John Lucas's appearance at the 
next Session holden " at Newgate in the olde Bayley in the suburbes of 
London,'' and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all 
people and especially towards " the company of weavers." G. D. R., 
3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

9 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of William Leafe of the parish 'St. Bothi' near 
Billingsgate in London yremonger and Ambrose Hackett of St. Olave's 
parish Hartstrete in Loridon stationer, in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of Henry Duffield of Lewis co. Sussex gentleman in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said Henry Duffield's appearance at the next 
Session of Gaol Delivery for Middlesex. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

13 November, 33 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisitionpost-mortem, 
taken at Whitechapple co. Midd. on view of the body of a male infant 
then and there lying dead : With Verdict that Elizabeth Webbe gave 
birth to the said infant secretly, and immediately after its birth killed 
it, by rolling it up in a piece of cloth with the intention of suffocating 
and murdering it. — A fragmentary parchment. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 
34 Eliz. 

15 November, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at the 
parish in the Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Parker and 
Richard Fee-James, both late of Clarkenwell gentlemen, assaulted and 



202 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

beat John Clarke and robbed him of two gold rings worth twenty 
shillings, and a leather purse worth sixpence, and thirty-seven shillings 
of numbered money. The bill exhibits clerical memoranda that the 
two gentlemen were at large. G. D. R., 3 Dec, 34 Eliz. 

15 November, 33 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sowthemymes co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Culpeper of Balcombe co. Sussex 
gentleman, Thomas Jurden of Arlingeton in the same co. gentleman, 
and John Threel jun. of London gentleman, entered forcibly on a 
certain manor or tenement with appurtenances in Sowthemymes afore- 
said, being the freehold of William Lee esq., against the Queen's peace 
and the form of a certain statute of 5 Ric. II. — Also, True Bill that, 
at Sowthemymes co. Midd. on 7 November 32 Eliz., Thomas Culpeper 
of Balcombe co. Sussex gentleman, Edward Leedes of Selmeston co. 
Sussex gentleman, Thomas Jurden of Arlington co. Sussex gentleman, 
John Threell of London gentleman, John Parrott of Sowthemy.mes 
husbandman, and John Androwe of the same parish laborer, unlawfully 
assembled in a certain manor or tenement called " Durhams," and with 
violence took possession of two parts of a certain field called Parke- 
feilde, to be divided into three parts, being the freehold of William Lee 
esq. G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

9 December, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Istellworth co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Newman late of London yoman stole 
three pigs worth thirty shillings and a sowe worth ten shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of the Lady Anne Gresham widow. G. D. R., 
34 Eliz. 

18 December, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackeney co. Midd. 
on the said day, Garrett Radkyn late of Stratford-at-Bowe co. Midd. 
assaulted Katherine Newby, an infant of eight years, " et ipsam Kathe- 
rinam tunc et ibidem felonice rapuit defloravit et carnaliter cognovit." 
G. D. R., . . . ., 34 Eliz. 

26 December, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of Henry Sackford of St. Joanes Jerusalem 
near Westsmithfeilde in London and Lancelot Clerk of London 
citizen and cooper, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Gregory Patson 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Gregory's appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd. G. D. R., . . . ., 34 EUz. 

3 January, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Gabriel 
Goodman, Dean of the Cathedral Church of Westminster, Francis 
Flower and Jerom Hawley, Justices of the Peace, of John Reason of 
Harlyngton co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said 
John Reason's appearance at the next Session of the Peace to be held 
in Midd., '■' then and there to answer vnto suche thinges as shalbe 
obiected against hym touchinge his Recusancye in absentinge and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 203 

absteyninge hym self from devyne seruice vsed in the Churche of 
England." G. D. R., . . . ., 34 Eliz. 

15 January, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Wapping co. Midd. 
on the said day, Baltazer Burrowemaster and Harman Myne, both say- 
lors, spoke scandalously and seditiously of the Lady the Queen, saying 
amongst other things " S . . . . upon the Quene." — Enough of a 
clerical memorandum appears on this mutilated bill to show that 
Baltazer Burrowemaster was sentenced to the pillory. G. D. R., . . . ., 
34 Eliz. 

20 January, 34 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Mathew Ebbes late 
of London yoman, who died in the gaol on the 19th inst. by Divine 
Visitation of " a pininge sicknes," after a month's illness. G. D. R., 
. . . .,34 Eliz. 

20 January, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Edgeworthe co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Garroll alias Lyllye alias Lawrence alias 
Garrett, late of London gentleman, stole a bay gelding worth twenty 
pounds and a pyed gelding worth ten pounds, of the goods and 
chattels of Robert Bosevyle esq. — Memorandum that the culprit was at 
large. G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

I February, 34 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Hawley 
late of London clerk, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the said William died of "the pininge sickn-es." — A fragmentary 
parchment. G. D. R., ... ., 34 Eliz. 

5 February, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Anne Paynes late of London spinster stole forty 
shillings in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys 
of Thomas Lilley. She put herself ' Guilty.' G. D. R., 7 April, 
34 Eliz. 

20 February, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J. P., of Emery Tilney of the Inner Temple 
London gentleman and Clement Caldicott of Clerkenwell gentleman, 
in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Hugh Owen of the same parish 
" servingman," in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Hugh's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to be held in the county. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 34 Eliz. 

23 February, 34 Elizabeth. — Seven several True Bills, against 
Rowland Jones, Paul Stringer, Robert Ball, David Crokers, Danyel 
Conyers, John Clarke and Clement Williams, all late of London 
yomen, for conjointly committing seven different highway robberies 
at Islington co. Midd. ; three of the robberies being committed on the 
23rd, three on the 24th, and on? on the 2Sth of the said February. 



204 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Putting themselves 'Guilty,' Rowland Jones, Paul Stringer, Robert 
Ball, David Crokers, Danyel Conyers and John Clarke were sentenced to 
be hung. Clement Williams was at large. G. D .R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 
24 February, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Francis Cumberford late of London gentle- 
man stole two velvet cloaks worth thirty pounds, two satten tunics 
worth twenty pounds, a pair of " clothe of golde " breeches worth 
five pounds, and five pairs of silk " stockins ' ' worth four pounds, of 
the goods and chattels of Anthony Denton. The thief was at large. 
G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

26 February, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Thomas Hobkins late of London yoman stole a 
woman's gown " de buffen " worth three pounds, a violet-coloured 
woollen-cloth gown worth fifty shillings, a russett-coloured woollen 
cloak worth twenty shillings, and a felt hat worth nine shillings, of 
the goods and chattels of Thomas Trystram. Acknowledging the 
indictment, Thomas Hobkyns asked for the book read like a clerk and 
was delivered. G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

27 February, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J. P., of Richard Skipwith and Rowland Flud 
of Westminster gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds, and John 
Henchman of the same city tailor, in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the appearance of the said John Henchman, and also of Mary 
Roccabett, wife of Paul Roccabett of the same city " drawer," at the 
next Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 34 Eliz. 

— March, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Grayes Inn Lane 
on ... . day of the said March, Thomas alias John 
Strelley of ... . Gloucester gentleman stole a dapple-graye 
gelding worth five pounds, a bridle worth two shillings, a girdle 
. . . ., a dagger worth four shillings, " unum strophiolum 
anglice a scarff," a cambric band worth eight shillings, a gauntlett worth 
eight shillings, a pair of shoes, with other things, of the goods and 
chattels of John Saire.- — A fragmentary parchment. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 34 Eliz. 

4 March, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Alsop of the parish of St. Michael-in-le- 
Querne in London goldsmith and David Fludd of Hackney co. Midd. 
yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Robert Ackland of 
Hackney aforesaid joyner, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said 
Robert Ackland's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex. 
G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz, 

13 March, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Richard 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 205 

Young esq. J. P., of Robert Bossevile of Aynesford co. Kent esq., in 
the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Robert Bossevile's appear- 
ance at the next Gaol Delivery for Midd., to give evidence against 
Thomas Bunninge and John Garrell alias Garrett alias Larrans. 
G. D. R., 7 April, 34 Eliz. 

27 March, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill against Richard Richardson, 
late of St. James's in Clarkenwell yoman, and Briget . . . ., 
servants of Elizabeth .... widow, and John Sappton of 
Hampsted co. Midd. gentleman, for not attending church, chapel or 
any usual place of Common Prayer. G. D. R., . . . ., 34 Eliz. 

6 April, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of Henry Bett of St. Leonard's in Shordich 
gentleman and .... Burbage in the Strond yeoman, in the 
sum of ten pounds each, and James Burbage of Shordiche gentleman, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said James Burbage's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace for the county of Middlesex. 
G. D. R., ..'.., 34 Ehz. 

12 April, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of John Home of St. Swithin's parish London and 
James Avenell of Whitecrosstreet in St. Giles's-without-Creaplegate 
tallowchandler, in the sum of ten pounds each, and William Burgen 
servant of William Johnson of ... . bricklayer, in the sum of 
twenty pounds ; For the said William Johnson's appearance at the 
next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. G. D. R., . . . ., 
34 Eliz. 

16 April, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Fulham 
CO. Midd. between the hours seven and eight p.m. of the said day, William 
Arnold of Fulham aforesaid yoman, with a sword gave Peter Jones 
late of London yoman on the right part of his belly a mortal blow ot 
which he then and there died instantly. Putting himself ' Not 
Guilty ' of the felonious killing called Manslaughter, William Arnold 
put himself ' Guilty ' of killing Peter Jones in self-defence. G. D. R. 

. , . ., 34 Eliz. 

17 April, 34 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Fulham co. Midd. on view of the body of Peter Jones late of 
London yoman : With Verdict that, on the i6th inst. William Arnolde, 
late of Fulham yoman was journeying in God's and the Queen's 
peace towards the dwelling-house of his father in Fulham aforesaid 
between the hours six and seven p.m., when there came to him the 
said Peter Jones who called out to him " Syrrha Syrrha you with the 
longe sworde stay for I must talke with thee," to whom William Arnold 
answered " I have nothinge to saye to thee," whereupon Peter Jones 
made an assault on the said William ; and that in the ensuing affray, 



2C6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

thus forced on him, William Arnolde in self-defence, and in no other 
way, gave Peter Jones on the right part of his breast a mortal blow, of 
which he then and there died. — A fragmentary parchment. G. D. R., 
.... 34 Eliz. 

26 April, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. 
during the night of the said day, Leonard Skelton late of London 
yoman broke burglariously into the house of Thomas Peasaker, and 
stole therefrom a woman's gown of sheep's russett colour worth twenty 
shillings, six pewter pottes worth ten shillings, eight pewter dysshes 
worth six shillings and eightpence, two'brasse kettles worth six shillings 
and eightpence, and two brasse pottes worth ten shillings. Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' Leonard Skelton was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
. ■ • -,34 Eliz. 

7 May, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fynnesburye co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Merricke yoman, Thomas Bemary (?) baker, 
Lawrence Morrys cutler and Robert Jerwood alias Arnold baker, all 
late of London, stole two books called " Foxe against Osocius " 
worth eight shillings, six books called " Testamentes " worth thirteen 
shillings, two bookes called " Psalme bookes " worth three shillings 
and sixpence, and two books called " Quintus Curtius " worth three 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Proctour. — Lawrence 
Morrys and Robert Jerwood were " extra prison'," John Merricke "po 
se cul nee rec," Thomas Bemary put himself ' Guilty,' asked for the 
book, read like a clerk and was delivered according to the form of the 
Statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 34 Eliz. 

17 May, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Evans late of London alien assaulted Giles 
Braunche alien, and with a poniard gave him in his left side a mortal 
wound of which he died instantly, and that Richard thus murdered the 
said Giles. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 34 Eliz. 

29 May, 34 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields on view of the body of 
Richard Cockett, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on . . . • 
between the hours three and four p.m. one George Asheley late of 
London yoman was at the house of a certain .... Sandes widow, 
when thither came Richard Cockett who forthwith said to the same 
George Asheley these English words, " George I have occacon to goe 
to the feildes and I praye you walke with me thether,'' whereupon 
Richard Cocket armed with " a longe sworde " and George Asheley 
armed with a rapier walked together, till they came to a close called the 
" Mase " in the parish of St. Martin aforesaid, where after speaking 
words to one another they drew forth their weapons and made an affray, 
in which affray George Asheley with his sword gave Richard Cockett on 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 207 

the outer part of his left leg a mortal wound, of which he died within a 
quarter of an hour ,34 EHz. 

I June, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Mayehewe gentle- 
man, Francis Fletcher gentleman and Henry Mayehew gentleman, all 
three of the parish of St. Clement Danes without the bars of the New 
Temple co. Midd., for not going to church, chapel or any usual place 
of Common Prayer from i June 34 Eliz. to 20 April then next following. 
G. D. R., 25 April, 35 Eliz. 

II June, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Seint Katherins co. 
Midd. on the said day, Simon Adams late of London yoman, 
assaulted John Ariens alien, and with a dagger gave him a blow of 
which he instantly died. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Simon Adams was 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R , 34 Eliz. 

26 June, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that (whereas Robert Sowth- 
well alias Robert Cowper alias Robert Cotton, late of London clerk, 
being born in the dominions of Elizabeth Queen of England &c. at 
St. Feigthes {i.e. St. Faith's) co. Norfolk, and after the feast of the 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist in i Eliz., was ordained a priest at 
Rome in parts beyond sea by authority derived and pretended 
from the See of Rome) Katherine Bellamy late of Uxenden in the 
parish of Harrowe co. Midd. spinster alias Katherine Bellamy wife of 
Richard Bellamy of Uxenden aforesaid, not having God before her 
eyes, but moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, knowing 
the same Robert Sowthwell alias Robert Cowper alias Robert Cotton 
to be such a priest as is specified fully above, and out of prison, on the 
said 26 June 34 Elizabeth knowingly and willingly received comforted 
aided and maintained him at Uxenden in Harrowe aforesaid, against 
the form of the Statute in that case provided, and against the said 
Queen's crown and dignity. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

26 June, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that (whereas Richard Wing- 
feild alias Richard Davies late of London clerk, being born at the city 
of Worcester co. Worcester, and after the feast of the Nativity of St. 
John the Baptist of i Eliz. was ordained a priest at Rheims in parts 
beyond sea by authority derived and pretended from the See of Rome) 
Katherine Bellamye late of Uxendon spinster alias Katherine Bellamye 
wife of Richard Bellamye of Uxendon in the parish of Harrowe co. Midd. 
gentleman, not having God before her eyes but moved and seduced by 
the instigation of the devil, knowing the same Richard Wingfeild alias 
Davies to be such a priest and out of prison, on the said 26 June 
34 Eliz. knowingly aixd willingly received comforted aided and main- 
tained him at Uxendon in the parish of Harrowe aforesaid, against the 
form of the Statute in this case provided, and also against the said 
Queen's peace crown and dignity. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 



208 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

21 July, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J.P., of James Kinvine of St. Brigitt's parish London 
marchaunt-tayler, in the sum of ten pounds, and WilHam Bull of Win- 
sore Castell in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said William Bull's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Midd. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 34 Eliz. 

12 August, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Douglas late of 
London gentleman assaulted Thomas Crowe and murdered him by 
shooting him with "a dagg charged with gunpowder and a buUett 
of leade," which bullet wounded the said Thomas, so that he died 
instantly; And that Clains Cornelys late of London yoman and 
Mathew Dodsworthe of the city of York gentleman aided and abetted 
the same John Douglas to commit the said murder. At the bill's foot, 
a memorandum that John Douglas and Clains Cornelys were acquitted 
of murder, and found guilty of manslaughter. — Also, on the same 
file, a True Bill, against the aforesaid John Douglas, Mathew Dods- 
worth and Clains Cornelis, for assaulting Thomas Crowe at St. Martin's- 
in-the-Fields, and stealing his grey gelding, worth three pounds. On 
the bill appear clerical memoranda, that John Douglas and Clains 
Cornelis put themselves 'Not Guilty,' and that Mathew Dodsworth was at 
large. —Also, the Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish 
of St. Margaret in Westminster, on 14 August 34 Eliz., on view of the 
body of Thomas Crowe, there lying dead. G. D. R., . . . .,35 Eliz. 

16 August, 34 Elizabeth. ^Recognizance, taken before I von 
Chalkhill coroner, of Mathew Dodsworth of the city of York gentle- 
man, John Swinborne of the same city yoman and Aquila Weekes of 
Wapley co. Gloucester gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each ; 
For their appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Midd., to give evi- 
dence against John Douglas for a certain murder. G. D. R., . , . ., 
35 Eliz. 

16 August, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Ivon 
Chakhill coroner, of Lancelet Davies yoman and Agnes Lyppes 
spinster, both of Knightesbridge co. Midd. in the sum of ten pounds 
each ; For the appearance of the said Lancelet and Agnes at the next 
Gaol Delivery for Midd., to give evidence against John Douglas for a 
certain murder. This bill by an obvious mistake is dated 35 Eliz., 
instead of 34 Eliz. G. D. R., 35 Eliz. 

20 August, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill against Fardinando Parrys 
gentleman, his wife Frances Parrys (alias Frances Parrys spinster), 
Elizabeth Parrys spinster, Thomas Crosbye yoman, Roger Wood-' 
warde yoman, Joan Breddis spinster, Richard Wilson yoman, Robert 
Woolward yoman, Anne Becker spinster, William Jackson yoman 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 209 

all of Tottenham co. Midd. ; Margaret Turner wife of John Turner, 
Elizabeth Taylor widow, Godfrey Barton yoman, John Davys yoman, 
his wife Katharine Davys, Katherine Momperson wife of Lawrence 
Momperson gentleman, Rachel Arrundell wife of Thomas Arrundell 
gentleman, Francis Payne yoman, his wife Mary, and John Williams 
yoman, all ten of Clarkenwell, for not going to church, chapel or 
any usual place of Common Prayer, from 20 August 34 Eliz. to 10 
December then next following. G. D. R., . . . . 35 Eliz. 

25 August, 34 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Robert Arnolde, Lawrence Morris, Abraham Symons, John 
Johnson and Dennis . . . ., all late of London yomen, stole a 
russett-coloured woollen-cloth cloak " with dunishe (?) velvett and layde 
on with silver lace" worth six pounds thirteen shillings and four 
pence, a sword called "a gilte rapier" and a girdle worth three 
pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Thomas Sicile knt.— 
Memoranda on the bill that Robert Arnolde and Lawrence Morris 
put themselves 'Guilty,' and were sentenced to be hung; and that 
Abraham Symons and John Johnson were out of prison ; no indica- 
tion being given of Dennis . . . 's fortune. — Also, on the same 
file, a True Bill that Lawrence Morryce and Robert Arnolde, at St. 
Katheryn's co. Midd. on the 4th of September 34 Elizabeth, stole 
a rapyer worth twenty shilUngs, of the goods and chattels of Henry 
Rogers gentleman ; and that Alexander Younge knowing the said 
Lawrence and Robert had committed the said felony, received and 
comforted them on 5 Sept. 34 Eliz. at Wapping. Over Alexander's 
name appears the clerical note " Extra " ; it being again recorded of 
Lawrence Morryce and Robert Arnold, " Po se cul Bus." G. D. R., 
6 Oct., 34 Ehz. 

10 September, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bromeley co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Typtoe late of Bromeley assaulted 
Suzan Foxe daughter of Thomas Foxe, an infant of eight years, " et 
ipsam Suzannam tunc et ibidem felonice rapuit defloravit et earn contra 
voluntatem suam carnaliter cognovit." Po se non cul nee rea 
G. D. R., 6 Oct., 34 Ehz. 

10 September, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bromeley co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Typtoe late of Bromeley aforesaid mil- 
ler, assaulted Joan Baldewyn daughter of Charles Baldewyn, an infant 
of ten years, "et ipsam Johannam tunc et ibidem felonice rapuit 
defloravit et earn contra voluntatem suam carnaliter cognovit." Po se 
non cul. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 34 EUz. 

19 September, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at 
Acton CO. Midd. on the said day, Edmund Neele, John Morrys, 
Dennis ..... John Johnson, William Moztooke, Richard Carter, 

p 



2IO MIDDLESEX SESSIONS* ROLLS. 

Abraham Symons, and William Browne, all late of London yomen, 
assaulted seven unknown men being in God's and the Queen's peace, 
and then and there beat wounded and maltreated them, and robbed 
them of two silver-gilt salts, four silver cups, two parcel-gilt silver cups, 
a parcel-gilt cup called "a Nutte," and eighteen parcel-gilt silver 
spoons, worth forty pounds; two black-and-russett woman's gowns 
worth ten pounds, two taffytye hattes worth twenty shillings, a woman's 
aperne worth sixteen shillings, a gold ring worth twenty shillings, three 
pairs of linen sheets worth three pounds, and forty parcels of linen 
cloth worth twenty pounds, of the goods and chattels of Richard 
Whateley, in the custody and possession of the same seven unknown 
men at Acton aforesaid. — Memoranda that seven of the eight robbers 
were out of prison. Of Dennis . . . ., nothing is said by the 
clerical annotator. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 34 Eliz. 

26 September, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Kentishtowne co. 
Midd. on the said day, Henry Baylie late of London gentleman stole 
a dapple-grey gelding flea-bitten about the face, worth ten pounds, of 
the goods and chattels of Paul Bellamye gentleman. Po se non cul 
nee rec. G. D. R., 25 April, 35 Eliz. 

I November, 34 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of Richard Fletcher of Aldersgate Street 
London, Master of the noble science of Fence and John David of St. 
Ethelburgh's parish in London of the said science, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and of John Harris " de parochia Creechurch London de 
nobilissima scientia predicta," in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the 
said John Harris's appearance at the next Session of the Peace co. 
Midd., and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing to ... . 
Greene widow. G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

16 November, 34 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. 
Midd. on the said day, Margaret wife of Robert Farmer late of St. 
Clement's Danes co. Midd. carpenter, with the intention of murdering 
Elizabeth the wife of Edward Crumwell at that time esq. and now the 
Lord Crumwell, mixed and administered to the said Elizabeth, then 
being sick, a certain potion, containing a poison called " mercurie alias 
ratesbane," the said Margaret knowing that ratesbane would kill the said 
Elizabeth, which poisonous potion the said Elizabeth Crumwell, in her 
confidence in said Margaret and in ignorance of the composition of the 
draught, drank then and there ; the result being that she languished 
from the said 16 Nov. 34 Eliz. to the 2nd of Jan. 35 Eliz., when she 
died of the said potion ; and that in so dealing with her, Margaret 
Farmer murdered the said Elizabeth Crumwell. G. D. R., . . . ., 
35 Eliz. 

17 December, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 211 

Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of John Maye of St. Johnstreet co. Midd. 
inholder, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Thomas Maddy of Staple 
Inne gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Thomas 
Maddy's appearance at the next Session of the Peace co. Midd., then 
and there to answer &c. to "the complaint of one Saxton, for that 
comeinge to the said Saxton's howse, and beinge by him denyed to 
haue a woman lodged in his house, he rayled vpon him and openly in 
the street exclaimed that the plague was in his howse, and diverse 
other wayes did both abuse himselfe and the sayd Saxton. G. D. R., 
..... 35 Eliz. 

17 January, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of Richard Salmon of St. Bride's parish London 
tallowchaundler and Richard Evans of St. Clement's Danes tailor, in 
the sum of ten pounds each, and of Thomas Nevell of Dunchurche 
CO. Warwick Turkeyworkewever, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For 
the appearance of the said Thomas Nevell and his wife Isabel at the 
next Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for the said Thomas's 
best efforts to produce the body of Robert Johnson alias Tassell. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

23 January, 35 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at the parish of Stepney co. Midd. on view of the body of 
William Atkyns late of London marryner : With Verdict, that Thomas 
Fleete on the said 23 Jan. 35 Eliz. was at Rattclyffe co. Midd. in God's 
and the Queen's peace, journeying towards Whitechappell between the 
hours six and seven a.m., when the aforesaid William Atkyns with his 
sword drawn assaulted him, whereupon Thomas Fleete retreated from 
the same William Atkyns, and so far as he was able fled towards a 
certain field called Welfielde near Whitechappell, when William 
Atkyns followed him and renewed his attack upon him with the 
intention of murdering him, upon which Thomas Fleete drew his 
sword; and that in the affray thus forced upon him the said 
Thomas with his sword gave the said William, on his right leg over 
the knee, of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 25 
April, 35 Eliz. 

28 January, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J.P., of WiUiam Stile of the precinct of St. Katherine co. 
Midd. yoman, in the sum of ten pounds, and Michael Mansell, servant 
of Edmund Stephens of the parish of AUhallowes Barkine, London, 
waterman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Michael 
Mansell's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer &c. 
to "the complaint of the wife of one Stephens, for that being hir hus- 
bandes prentice and by him apointed to goe to sea in a marchantes 
shipp, he notwithstanding went with the Lord of Cumberland, and 



212 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

being come home he refuseth to serve and to give his pay to his sayd 
mistress." G. D. R., . . . ., 35 Eliz. 

I February, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J.P., of Henry Reade of the Middell Temple in London 
gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Henry Reade's 
appearance at " y° nexte Sessions of Inquiry at the Castell within the 
county of Midd., and then and there to give evidence and pursue 
the lawe with effecte againste Alias Rodes alias Brome, and in like 
manner at y" Sessions Hall in thoulde Baly." G. D. R., . . . ., 

35 Eliz. 

14 March, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of Roger Easton of the parish of Allhallowes 
Bawkine in London glover, in the sum of five pounds, and of Philip 
Dowman of the precinct of St. Katherine near the Tower of London 
CO. Midd. glover, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Philip 
Bowman's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, then 
and there to answer inc. " For that he hath diuersely abused his wife 
as well by beatinge, as by putting hir from him withoute anye main- 
tenance or any lawfull cause." G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

29 March, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J.P., of Ralphe Trehearne taylor and George Kerfoote 
silkewever, both, of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and John Reade of Finchlye co. Midd. smithe, in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John Reade's appearance at the 
next Session of the Peace in co. Midd., and in the mean time for 
his peaceful bearing towards all people, and more especially towards 
Anthony Tomsonn of Finchelye yoman. G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 
Eliz. 

31 March, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westdrayton co. 
Midd. on the said day Elizabeth Robertes wife of Nicholas Roberts 
of the said parish yoman, alias Elizabeth Roberts of the same parish 
spinster practised " witchraftes (sic) enchauntmentes charmes and 
sorceries " upon and against Richard Yerley an infant of four years, by 
reason of which devilish practice the said Richard languished from the 
said 31 March 35 Eliz. till the last day of April 37 Eliz., on which last- 
named day he died of the same exercise of diabolical arts. — Also, on 
the same file, a True Bill against the same Elizabeth Roberts, for 
practising witchcraft, at West Drayton on 31 May 36 Eliz., upon and 
against Thomas Huttchinn and Robert Huttchin (of ages not given), 
so that they languished from the said day till i June 37 Elizabeth, 
when they died at West Drayton by reason of the same devilish 
practice. — Also, on the same file, another True Bill against the same 
Elizabeth Robertes for practising witchcraft &c., at West Drayton on 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 213 

7 June 37 Eliz., upon and against Thomas Lazenby (of an age not 
stated) so that he languished and died at West Drayton by reason of 
the same exercise of devilish arts, on 30 November 38 Eliz. On her 
arraignment, Elizabeth Roberts put herself ' Not Guilty ' and did not 
retract. The dates of these charges are the more noteworthy, as 
Elizabeth Robertes was not indicted till the October of the Queen's 
43rd year. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 

6 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Barne 
esq. J. P., of William Kinersley of the parish of St. Mary Overies co. 
Surrey gentleman and Zacheus Harllackenden of Tunstall co. Kent 
gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each ; For the appearance 
of Thomas Borrowe at the next Session of the Peace in Midd., to 
answer to a charge of felony preferred against him by Thomas 
Engeham. G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

10 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of William Gomersall servant of George Gibson of 
Westsraythfeild brewer, and Richard Richardson of St Botolph's- 
without-Bushopsgate London surgeon, in the sura of ten pounds each, 
and of Thomas Hanson of London yoman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said Thomas Hanson's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace, to answer for " beatinge and woundinge of the 
wife of Robert Robbinson . . . ., afermed to be in some danger 
of her death, but since is well recoverd." G. S. P. R., Easter, 
35 Eliz. 

14 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of John Jenkes of Eaton co. Salop gentleman, John 
Downes of Tickhill co. York gentleman, and Thomas Gower of 
London gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Henry 
Gower of Bolton co. Worcester gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said Henry Gower's appearance at the next Session 
of the Peace co. Midd. G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

14 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt J. P., of John Every of St. Buttolph's-without-Aldersgate 
in London perfumer and Anthony Pafry of Whitchappell co. Midd. 
yoman in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Peter Phillipps of 
Peterborowe co. Northampton gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the appearance of the said Peter Phillipps at the next General 
Session of the Peace co. Midd., and in the mean time for his peace- 
ful bearing to all people and more especially to Hellen Blunte widow. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 35 Eliz. 

15 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of John Hunte of ... . and Edward Turrell 
of St. Sepulchre's London inholder, in the sum of forty pounds 



214 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

each, and of ... . Droninge of St. Mary's Southwark inholder, 
in the sum of one hundred marks ; For the said Droninge's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace in Midd. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
35 EHz. 

20 April, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Game of 
Clerkenwell co. Midd. yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any 
usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 20 Ap. 35 Eliz. to the 
20th of April then next following. G. D. R., 15 May, 36 Eliz. 

22 April, 35 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Dowglas 
" estraunger " : With Verdict that the said John Dowglas died in the 
said gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknes" on the 21st inst., 
after six weeks of illness. G. D. R., 25 April, 35 Eliz. 

30 May, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Graies Inne co. 
Midd. on the night of the said day, James Lee late of London 
yoman, burglariously entered the dwelling-house of Lancelet Loveles 
in the said Inne, and stole therefrom "a Lawe Booke " worth 
thirteen shillings and four pence. Putting himself ' Guilty ' of felony, 
but ' Not Guilty ' of the burglary, James Lee asked for the book, 
read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of the 
Statute. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 35 Eliz. 

I June, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Francis 
Flower J. P., of Edward Boorde of Cuckefilde co. Sussex and 
Andrew Roch of Plymouth co. Devon, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and Thomas Diar gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For 
the said Thomas Diar's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of 
Newgate, then and there to answer to such matters as may be 
objected against him. G. D. R., 5 July, 35 Eliz. 

I June, 35 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hoxton co. Midd. on view of the body of a certain unknown 
female infant, then and there lying dead : With Verdict that Jane 
Little late of Hoxton co. Midd. spinster alone and secretly gave birth 
to the said female infant, living at the time of birth, on a certain 
field called the Common Field, and forthwith in order to kill the 
same infant put and buried her in a hole of the same field and so 
murdered the same infant. On her arraignment, putting herself 
' Guilty,' Jane Little was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 5 July, 
35 Eliz. 

22 June, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Francis 
Flower esq. J. P., of Robert Tirrell of Barnesey co. Surrey and Richard 
Hare of London gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of 
Launcelott Clayton alias Captaine Cleyton, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said Launcelott Clayton's appearance at the next 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 21 5 

Gaol Delivery of Newgate, then and there to answer to such things 
as may be objected against him. G. D. R., 5 July, 35 Eliz. 

30 June, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Strand (le strond) 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Edward Revill gentleman stole nine 
pounds in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of 
William Jackett. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

2 July, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of Thomas Swetnam of London citizen and draper, 
in the sum of ten pounds, and of Roger Tedder of Whitechappell 
taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Roger Tedder's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, and in the 
mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all people, and especially 
towards his wife Margaret. G S. P. R., Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 

7 {sic) July, 35 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Margaret's parish in Westminster, on view of the body of 
George Barton gentleman, there lying dead and killed : With Verdict, 
that between the hours one and two p. m. of the said day, Edmund Wilton 
late of London gentleman was in God's and the Queen's peace at the 
said parish, in the parlour (parler) of the dwelling-house of Nicholas 
Nelson, when the said George Barton with a drawn dagger worth two 
shillings and eightpence and with a sword called " a curtelaxe " worth 
five shillings, then and there drawn, made an assault on the aforesaid 
Edmund, and furiously hurled at him the aforementioned dagger ; Where- 
upon the said Edmund withdrew himself from the said George Barton 
into a corner of the parlour, and the said George Barton in continuing 
his assault furiously followed the said Edmund Wilton with his 
drawn sword with the intention of slaying and murdering him : By 
reason of which, and because the aforesaid George Barton was between 
him and the door of the same parlour, so that he (the said Edmund) 
could not escape with his life, he, having a certain rapier worth five 
shillings, which he then and there held in his right hand drawn, in law- 
fully defending himself then and there with the said sword gave the 
said George a mortal blow, of which he then and there died instantly ; 
and that in thus killing George Barton, the said Edmund Wilton slew 
him lawfully in self-defence and for he preservation of his own life. 
G. D. R., 5 July, 35 Eliz. 

12 July, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin Hop- 
ton knt. J. P., of Alexander Cosby of Stradally " in com' dne n're Regine " 
in Ireland esq. and Owen Garven servant of the said Queen, in the 
sum of twenty pounds eacTi, and of Patrick Brangan, servant of the 
said Alexander Cosby, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said 
Patrick's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for co. 
Midd. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 



2l6 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

I August, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Fletewood esq. J. P. of John Dilkes gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds, and of Edward Dylkes and John Assheton gentlemen, in the 
sum of forty pounds each ; For the appearance of the said Edward 
Dylkes and John Assheton at the next General Session of the Peace 
to be held in Middlesex, and in the mean time for their peaceful 
bearing towards all people and especially towards John Madox gentle- 
man.— Also, similar sets of Recognizances, taken before the same Jus- 
tice of the Peace, for the appearance of John Gyrdler and David Jones 
yomen, and of William Byllinges and Anthony Garlicke yomen, at the 
next General Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for their 
peaceful bearing towards John Madox gentleman. G. S. P. R., Michael- 
mas, 35 Eliz. 

I August, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Le Mynories co. 
Midd. on the said day, Patrick Masterton late of London yoman 
entered the dwelling-house of John Nowell M.D., and stole therefrom 
twelve silver-gilt spoons worth twelve pounds, a pair of bracelettes 
worth ten pounds, a gold ring set with ajacinthe worth thirteen pounds, 
a gold ring with a ruble set therein worth forty shillings, a gold ring 
with a gem called " a corialine " set in it worth twelve shillings, a paire 
of knyves with silver haftes worth eight shilUngs, three hundred pounds 
of gold, and forty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods and chattels 
of the said John Nowell " doctor in medicinis.'' At the bill's foot, this 
memorandum, " Po se respectuatur et vacat quia patet per evidenc' 
qd' felon' fact' fuit in London et non in Com Midd." G. D. R., 
27 July, 39 Eliz. 

20 August, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of John Nowell of the parish "de le Mynorites 
medicinse doctor" and Thomas Beale of Norton-folgate co. Midd. 
butcher, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Edward Payne of 
Hoxton gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said Edward's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace to be held in co. Midd., 
and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all people. 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 

27 August, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at the 
house called " le three Cuppes " of WilHam Grome inholder of St. 
Johnstreate in St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd.j Jane Baylye late of 
the said street widow stole twenty-one pounds in numbered moneys, of 
the goods and chattels of John Eastwood clothier. — Also, True Bill 
that, at the same house on the same day, the same Jane Baylye stole 
forty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods, chattels and moneys 
of George Horsfoll. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

6 September, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Henry Stydley of 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 21/ 

Laleham co. Midd. gentleman, Elizabeth Waters wife of Richard 
Waters of Ickenham co. Midd. gentleman alias Elizabeth Waters of 
Ickenham spinster, Edward Wynsore of Cranford co. Midd. gentleman, 
his wife Helen alias Helen Wynsore of Cranford spinster, Jane Snoden 
wife of Richard Snoden of Cranford labourer alias Jane Snoden of the 
said parish spinster, Nicholas Russell of Edgeware co. Midd. yoman, 
and Edward Grymes alias Underwood of Clarkenwell co. Midd. yoman, 
for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common 
Prayer from the said 6 Sept. 35 Eliz. to the ist of January then next 
following. G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

II September, 35 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highholborne 
CO. Midd. between the hours eight and nine of the night of the said 
day, John Wright late of London yoman broke burglariously into the 
house of John Beste gentleman, and stole therefrom a pepper-boxe 
of silver double-gilte worth forty shillings, a gold chaine worth six 
pounds and thirteen shillings, a redde mantle of woollen cloth 
trimmed with "bilUmente lase " worth twenty shillings, a testerne of a 
bedde of silke worthe thirty shillings, a damaske kirtle worth ten 
shillings, and a kercher worth ten shilhngs, of the goods and chattels 
of the said John Beste gentleman. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 36 Eliz. 

11 September, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J. P., of James Burbage of Hallywell (? Street) 
yoman ; For the appearance of the said James Burbage at the next 
Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex, then, and there to 
answer &c. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 

13 September, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of John Hostman of St. Marten's-le-graund in London 
goldsmith, Simon Hostman of the parish of the Savoy goldsmith, and 
Peter Musard of the town of Cambrige goldsmith, in the sum of forty 
pounds each ; For the appearance of the said John, Simon and Peter 
at the next General Session of the Peace in Middlesex. G. S. P. R., 
Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 

3 October, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J.P., of John Sharpe of St. Johnstreete co. Midd. victular, 
in the sum of five pounds ; For the said John Sharpe's appearance at 
the next General Session of the Peace, then and there to answer " for 
obstinatly refusinge to pay the Fyfteenes : and for that he is a very 
frowerd stubberne fellow." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 35 Eliz. 

12 October, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance of Thomas Hankine, 
servant of WiUiam Beecher of London esq., in the sum of twenty 
pounds, and of John Winn, also servant of the said WiUiam Beecher, 
in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said Thomas Winn's appearance at 
the next General Session of the Peace, to answer " for strikeinge and 



2l8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

greatly abusinge of the Constable of Hoxdon as well by blowes, as by 
most opprobrious revileing speches." G. S. P. R., Easter, 36 Eliz. 

17 October, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of William Harman of Lymehouse co. Midd. 
lymeman, in the sum of five pounds ; For the said William's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. 
"for that havinge a warrant to apprehende one that had gotten a maide 
with childe, he apprehended him and suffered him to escape." 
G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

8 November, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J.P., of George Blackstone of Blackstone co. 
York gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; P'or the said George 
Blackstone's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to 
answer &c. " for that he was charged with ridinge awaye with another 
man's horse." G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

8 November, 35 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Young esq. J.P., of Robert Jones and Thomas Pope, both of 
St. Saviour's in Southwarke gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of Edward Harris of the same parish waterman, in the sum 
of twenty pounds ; For the said Edward's appearance at the next 
Session of the Peace for Middlesex. G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

I December, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J. P., of William Mathewes master of fence (magister 
defensionis) and John Wells barbor-surgeon, both of St. Sepulchre's in 
London, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Luke Goldinge of 
Charterhouselane " coachcoverer," in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the said Luke's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for 
Middlesex. G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

8 December, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of George Richbell of Bansteade co. Surrey 
yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said George Richbell's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Middlesex, to give evi- 
dence against John Nashe respecting a certain felony, for which the 
said John has been attached at the said George's suggestion. G. D. R., 
21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

20 December, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within the Gaol of Newgate on view of the bodies of Ralph 
Willoughby and William Hasellwood, both late of London yeomen : 
With Verdict that Ralph Willoughby died within the gaol by Divine 
Visitation of "the pestilence" on the 19th inst. after six days of 
illness, and that William Hasellwood died within the gaol by Divine 
Visitation of " a pyninge sicknes " on the 1 7th inst. after three days 
of illness. G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Ehz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 219 

26 December, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Eastesmithefeilde on view of the body of Thomas Jones, late 
of Eastesmythefeilde brewer : With Verdict that, on the night of the 
25th inst. between the hours ten and eleven p.m., the said Thomas 
Jones was in bed in the dwelling-house of John Vanhulste of Easte- 
smithefeilde brewer, when John Simpkinson of the same place labourer 
broke in upon him and with a knife gave him on the right part of his 
body a mortal blow, of which he died on the following day. On his 
arraignment John Sympkinson put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

28 December, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. John's Strete 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Sara Jackson late of London spinster stole 
five yards of woollen cloth " coloris Peach-culler vocat. Pennistoun 
ad valenciam xxvs.," of the goods and chattels of George Hawfeilde. 
G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

JO January, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Haynes esq. J. P., of Walter Gower and Thomas Smithe, both of 
Paddington co. Midd. gentlemen, and of John Smithe of Blackamore 
CO. Essex gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds each ; For the 
appearance of the said Walter, Thomas and John, at the next Session of 
Enquiry at Westminster, then and there " to answer to fellony layde 
againste them by one Story." G. D. R., 21 Jan., 36 Eliz. 

10 January, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Katherine the wife 
of Anthony Kytchyn of Harnesey co. Midd. gentleman, alias 
Katherine Kytchyn of the said parish spinster, for not going to church, 
from the said loth of January to 13th of February then next following. 
G. D. R., IS Feb., 36 Eliz. 

15 February, 36 Elizabeth. — Memorandum that (proclamation 
having been made at the last Gaol Delivery of Newgate, of 2 1 Jan. 
last past, for Henry Stydley of Laleham co. Midd. gentleman, Eliza- 
beth Waters wife of Richard Waters of Ickenham co. Midd. gentle- 
man a/ias Elizabeth Waters of the said parish spinster, Edward 
Wynsor of Cranford co. Midd. gentleman, and his wife Helen ah'as 
Helen Wynsor spinster, Jane Snodon wife of Richard Snodon of 
Cranford aforesaid laborer, Nicholas Russell of Edgeware co. Midd. 
yoman, and Edward Grymes alias Underwood of Clerkenwell co. 
Midd. yoman, to surrender themselves to the Sheriff of Middlesex 
before the next Gaol Delivery for the said county, which is this present 
Gaol Delivery, then and there to answer respecting certain transgressions 
and contempts in not going to church, of which they were indicted) 
the aforesaid Henry Stydley &c. have not come to this Gaol Delivery, 
and are therefore convicted of the said transgressions and contempts. 
G. D. R., 15 Feb., 36 Eliz. 



220 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

4 March, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hackney on view of the body of Thomas Goldston, then 
and there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 3rd. instant between 
the hours four and five p.m., the said Thomas Goldston and a certain 
Richard Carpenter of Hackney yoman, sixteen years old, were playing 
together in the house, of a certain William Harrison of the said 
parish, when they found in " the hall " of the same house " a dagg" 
charged with powder and ball and " a fowlingepece " also charged with 
powder and ball, with which weapons they played, in ignorance that 
the dagg and fowlinge pace were loaded, Richard Carpenter having 
the fowlinge pece and Thomas Goldston the dagg ; and in so playing 
Richard Carpenter unintentionally and by mischance shot Thomas 
Goldston in the face, so that he died instantly. On his arraignment, 
Richard Carpenter put himself ' Guilty ' by mischance. G. D. R., 
21 June, 36 Eliz. 

16 March, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chelsey co. Midd. 
on the said day, Henry Manninge late of London yoman, stole a 
silver bason and a silver ewer worth twelve pounds, " duas mamillas 
vocat' white fustian waistcoates ad valenciam iiij li.," a bearinge clothe 
of crimson taffatye worth forty shillings, two yards of blacke broade 
clothe worth three pounds, and a russet-colour woollen-cloth cloak 
worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Reverend 
in Christ Richard the Bishop of Worcester. G. D. R., 21 June, 
36 Eliz. 

20 March, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Magdalen Benson of 
Cranford co. Midd. spinster, Helena "vxor Edwardi Winsour de Cran- 
ford in com. Midd. predict' spinster," John Derevers of Shorditch 
CO. Midd. yoman, and John Calvyn of Shoreditch aforesaid yoman ; 
For not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common 
Prayer, from the said 20 March 36 Eliz. to 30 September then next . 
following. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

4 April, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Hardmondsworthe co. Midd. on view of the body of Edward 
Culver, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on 26 Dec. 36 Eliz. be- 
tween the hours eleven and twelve p.m., the said Edward Culver, 
George Hulett labourer and Robert Glynne yoman, all of Harmonds- 
worthe aforesaid, quarreled and fought together with their fists, in which 
affray George Hulett with his teeth bit the middle finger of Edward 
Culver's left hand, so that the same left hand and the arm became 
putrid and sick, and that Edward Culver languished from the said 26th 
of December to the 2sth of March next following, on which day he 
died of the wound so given him. On his arraignment for thus killing 
Edward Culver, George Hulett put himself ' Not Guilty,' and the 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 221 

jurors on their oath declared "quod Johannes Atstyle interfecit et 
occidit predictum Edwardum Culver." G. D. R., 21 June, 36 Eliz. 

4 April, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. John's Strete co. Midd. on view of the body of Joan Saxton, there 
lying-dead : With Verdict that, on the night of the 3rd inst. between 
the hours nine and ten p.m., the said Joan was in her bedroom in her 
dwelling-house in the said street, preparing herself for the bed in which 
her husband William Saxton of the same street cook was lying, when he, 
having a quarrel with her and not wishing her to lie with him, threw at 
her " quandam matulam stanni voc' a chamberpote," which struck her 
violently " super dextram partem ventris," so as to take away her 
breath and cause her to die instantly. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

23 April, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill, that John Browne, Robert 
Ambrose, William Standley, Francis Brewerton and John Weekes, all 
late of London yomen, at Howneslowe in the parish of Heston co. 
Midd. were seen and found in the consort or society of vagabonds 
commonly called Egipcians, and that the same John &c. call themselves 
Egipcians, and that thus they feloniously did, continued and remained 
there and elsewhere in the same county for the space of a month, from 
23 April 36 Eliz. to 24 May then next following. — John Browne and 
Robert Ambrose were at large ; William Standley, Francis Brewerton 
and John Weekes put themselves ' Guilty,' and were sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 21 June, 36 Eliz. 

26 April, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Thomas 
Fowler esq. J.P., of Thomas Gladwine of Hatfeilde co. Hartford, 
servant to Lord Henry Cocke (apud dominum Henricum Cocke), in 
the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Thomas Gladwin's appearance at 
the next Session to be held in Middlesex, to give evidence against John 
Tucker for a highway robbery. G. D. R., 15 May, 36 Eliz. 

I May, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Edward Chester, lateofWest- 
minster yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any place of Common 
Prayer, from i May 36 Eliz. to i May 37 Eliz. — Also, on the same file, 
similar True Bill against Josias Wakefeilde of Heston co. Midd. glasier, and 
Elizabeth Waters of Ickenham co. Midd. spinster alias Elizabeth Waters 
wife of Richard Waters of Ickenham aforesaid gentleman, for not going 
to church from 20 Dec. 37 Eliz. to the 22nd of March then next follow- 
ing. — Also, on the same file, similar True Bill against William Weston 
gentleman, and his wife Elizabeth Weston (alias Elizabeth Weston 
spinster) of Clarkenwell , John Charnocke gendeman, his wife Eliza- 
beth (alias Elizabeth Charnock spinster), Dorothy Charnock spinster 
and Edith Charnock spinster, all four of Muswellhill in the parish of 
St. James in Clarkenwell ; Isabell Pearsey spinster, William Hipperyn 
alias Hipporon yoman, Anne Stubbyns widow, Francis Thynne gentle- 



222 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

man, and Samuel Todd yoman, all five of St. James's, Clarkenwell ; 
Alice Pawlen of St. Johnstreete in the parish of St. Sepulchre in 
London widow ; and Charles Chillibrand gentleman, Francis Milles 
gentleman, Thomas Pallmer yoman, Thomas Hope yoman, William 
Woadsowne gentleman, James Duckett gentleman, his wife Anne 
Duckett {alias Anne Duckett spinster) and Martha Milles wife pf 
Francis Milles aforesaid {alias Martha Milles spinster), all eight of 
Chauncerylane in St. Andrew's Holborne, for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer from 20 Dec. 37 Eliz. 
to the 22nd of March then next following. G. D. R., 2 May, 
37 EHz. 

6 May, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Stephen Standishe, late 
of St. Clement's-Danes without the bars of the New Temple gentleman, 
for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer 
from the said 6 May 36 Eliz. to the last day of October then next follow- 
ing. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

18 May, 36 Elizabeth.- — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Westminster co. Midd. on view of the body of Reginald Launcaster, 
there lying dead: With Verdict ' that, on the 1 6th inst. between the 
hours three and four p.m., a certain William Slade late of London 
yoman was at the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, journeying towards 
Holborne about the business of his master Sir George Savill knt. when 
the said Reginald Launcaster with his sword and dagger drawn 
attacked the same William Slade, who retreated from his assailant as 
far as a ditch full of water beyond which he could not go ; and that 
then in self-defence the said William Slade drew his sword, and with it 
in the ensuing affray gave the said Reginald a mortal blow, of which he 
died on the following day. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

24 May, 36 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Whitechappell co. Midd. on view of the body of John Smyth, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 19th inst. between the hours 
seven and eight p.m., in the highway at Shoreditch in the parish of St. 
Botolph-without-Bushopgate, the said John Smyth and a certain George 
Hall late of London carpenter fought together with their fists, when 
John Smyth, being the stronger man, knocked George Hall down and 
fell upon him, Whereupon George Hall drew his dagger and with it gave 
John Smyth under his right breast a mortal blow, of which he lan- 
guished from the said 19th inst. to the 22nd inst., when he died of the 
same blow. Memorandum, that at the Gaol Delivery of 17 Jan. 
37 Elizabeth George Hall put himself 'Not Guilty,' "nee rec set 
Johannes Death occidit hominem." G. D. R., 4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

10 June, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highe Holborne co. 
Midd. on the said day, Allan Starlinge late of Highe Holborne aforesaid 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 223 

cook assaulted beat and wounded Elizabeth Conyers, wife of William 
Conyers of the same place cobler, so that her life is despaired of. 
G. D. R., 21 June, 36 Eliz. 

16 June, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J.P., of Gilbert Yelvertoft of the Middle Temple gentle- 
man and Robert Crofte of London gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds each ; For the appearance of Katherine Arden of Norton-folgate 
CO. Midd. at the next Session of the Peace in the said county. G. D. R., 
21 June, 36 Eliz. 

2 July, 36 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, on the said day at the parish 
of St. Clement-Danes without the bars of the New Temple in London, 
Richard Phillippes late of the said parish yoman assaulted Thomas 
Walter yoman and with a dagger gave the said Thomas " on the lower 
parte of his necke " a mortal blow and wound, of which he languished 
from the said 2nd of July 36 Eliz. to the 24th day of the said month, 
when he died of the same blow. Acknowledging the indictment, Richard 
Phillippes asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to 
the custody of his bail till the next Gaol Delivery after Hilary term. 
G. D. R., I Dec, 40 Eliz. 

22 August, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. John's Strete co. Midd. on view of the body of Edward 
Favour late of the said street laborer, there lying dead ; With Verdict 
that, in Cheapside on the 21st inst. between the hours four and five 
p.m., the said Edward Favour and a certain Nicholas Bankes late of 
London cutler exchanged words of insult, whereupon Edward Favour 
with his fist struck Nicholas Bankes, after which blow Edward Favour 
drew out his dagger in self-defence against his assailant, and with it in 
the ensuing affray gave Edward Favour in the left part of his belly a 
mortal blow, of which he died on the following day. On his arraign- 
ment for manslaughter, Nicholas Bankes put himself ' Guilty,' asked 
for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered according to the form 
of the Statute. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

10 Sefiember, 36 Elizabeth. ^ — True Bill that, at Tottenham co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Welde late of Edmonton co. Midd. 
yoman stole a tambe («r) stagge of red colour worth ten shillings, with 
a bell worth two pence and a leather collar attached to the neck of 
the same stag, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Henry 
Lord Hunesdon, Lord Chamberlain of the Queen's Household. 
G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

18 September, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Tottenham co. 
Midd. on the said day, Edmund Warde late of London yoman stole a 
mallard-coloured woollen cloth cloak worth fifty shillings, a fustian 
doublett worth twenty shillings, and two silver-gilt rings worth six 



224 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Windre. G. D. R., 
4 Oct., 36 Eliz. 

I October, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Palmer 
yoman, James Duckett yoman, his wife Anne Duckett (alias Anne 
Duckett spinster), Agnes Pluckett spinster {alias Agnes Pluckett, wife 
of Olyver Pluckett yoman), all of Higholborne co. Midd. ; William 
Weston, and his wife Elizabeth Weston (alias Elizabeth Weston 
spinster), both of St. James's Clarkenwell ; and John Charnock of 
Muswellhill in Clarkenwell gentleman; For not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer from i Oct. 36 Eliz. 
to the 22nd of December then next following. G. D. R., 2 May, 

37 Eliz- 

16 October, 36 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on 
the said day, Thomas Mersom alias Masham late of London 
yoman stole ten pounds in divers pieces of coined gold and ninety 
pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods, chattels and moneys of 
Edward Bisse, William Barnarde and Stephen Strowde. Rep', pro 
comitatu Sowthampton per J. Popham milit. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 
37 Eliz. 

23 October, 36 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Roger Downes, 
there lying dead : With Verdict that the said Roger died within the 
gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknes" on the 22nd inst. 
after thirteen days of illness. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

II November, 36 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir 
Owin Hopton knt. J. P., of Edward Zacheverell of Golding-lane 
gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Edward's 
appearance at the next Session. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

20 November, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before 
Richard Skevington esq. J. P., of William Crosley of Pycorner, 
London, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said William 
Crosley's appearance "at the next Sessions holden at the Castle in 
St. Joanes Streete without Smythfield Bars," to give evidence against 
one Richard Gorton. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

25 November, 37 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Shordiche on 
the said day, Richard Defoye late of London yoman stole a blankett 
worth five shillings and a woollen-cloth coverlet worth sixteen shill- 
ings, of the goods and chattels of Sicillia Smythe. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 
37 Eliz. 

30 November, 37 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the highway at 
Haies co. Midd. on the said day between three and four p.m., Edward 
. . . . gentleman, Tristram Hutchins yeoman, Nicholas Webster 
yeoman, and John Linsey yeoman, all late of London, assaulted Edward 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 225 

Wattes and robbed him of a skycoloured woollen cloak worth ten 
shillings, a hat worth five shillings, and a sword worth three shillings. 
On the bill appears a clerical memorandum that Tristram Hutchins on 
arraignment put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. — 
Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same four highwaymen, 
for assaulting John Noble, at the same parish between the same hours 
of the same day, and robbing him of a white gelding worth thirty 
shillings, a saddle and bridle worth ten shillings, and seventeen shill- 
ings in numbered money. — Also, on the same file, a True Bill against 
the same four highwaymen, for assaulting Gilbert Frognier, at the 
same place between the same hours of the same day, and robbing him 
of a sword worth five shillings, a dagger worth eighteen pence, and 
nine shillings and sixpence in numbered money. — Also, on the same 
file, a True Bill against the same four highwaymen, for assaulting 
Edward Wattes, at the same place between the same hours of the same 
day, and robbing him of a purple gown worth four pounds, a tawney- 
coloured cloak worth thirty shillings, a pair of black velvet breeches worth 
twenty shillings, and a pair of straw-coloured breeches worth thirteen 
shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Wolfe, in 
the keeping of the said Edward Wattes. — In the indictments one of the 
highwaymen is variously described, as " yoman " and " gentleman." The 
name of the place, where the robbery was committed, is spelt variously 
" Haies," " Heesse," " Hesse " and " Hayes." G. D. R., 2 Dec, 37 Eliz. 

I January, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in 
Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Josia Ryley of the said parish 
widow practised the wicked and devilish arts called " witchcraftes 
enchauntementes charmes and sorceries " upon Herbert Apshawe, so 
that he languished from the same detestible arts, from i Jan. 37 Eliz. to 
the second day of the same month, "per spacium trigint' horarum et 
amplius," and died on the same 2nd of January. At the bill's head, this 
memorandum, " Po se mortuus [sic] in facie curie." — Also, on the same 
file, a True Bill that the same Josia Ryley widow, at the same parish 
on II July 39 Elizabeth, practised the same impious and detestable 
arts of witchecraftes &c. on a certain Margaret Burroughes, so that 
" languebat et languidus (sic) vixit et adhuc in periculo vite sue existit " 
=so that she languished and lived feebly and still remains in danger 
of her life. The same clerical memorandum (Po se mortuus (sic) 
in facie curie) at the head of this indictment also. G. D. R., 27 July, 
39 Eliz. 

6 February, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Savoy co. Midd. 
in a house called " the Savoye," John Kidd late of London yoman 
assaulted Margaret Darsye, an infant under ten years of age, and then 
andthere " eandem Margaretam Darsye felonice illicite et carnaliter 

Q 



226 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

cognovit." Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Kidd was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz. 

19 February, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Suffeild 
late of London yoman : With Verdict that the said William died by 
Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sicknes" on the i8th inst. after nine 
days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz. 

3 March, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Stanhop and John Fatte, both late of Lon- 
don yomen, stole twenty-nine yards of woollen broadclothe, of the 
colour muskecullor, worth nine pounds, and fifty yards of the woollen 
cloth called " bayes," of black colour, worth three pounds, of the goods 
and chattels of Robert Atkinson. G. D. R., 10 July, 37 Eliz. 

3 March, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before George 
Asshebye esq. J.R, of Thomas Lovegroe of Westminster yoman and 
William Woodward e of the same city yoman, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and of Thomas College of Westminster yoman, in the 
sura of twenty pounds ; For the said Thomas College's appearance at 
the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to answer 
concerning a felony, of which he is suspected. G. S. P. R., Easter, 
37 Eliz. 

9 March, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Crisp 
late of London yoman : With Verdict that the said William died 
within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sicknes " on 
the 8th inst., after thirteen days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 
37 Eliz. 

II March, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of 
Anthony Barnes late of the said parish yoman, there lying dead : With 
Verdict that, on the 9th instant, between the hours five and six p.m., 
a certain James Perte late of the said parish yoman was within the 
same parish, and making his way in God's and the Queen's peace 
towards St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, when the said Anthony Barnes with 
his rapier drawn made an assault upon him ; that James Perte vainly 
retreated from his assailant in order to escape from him ; and that in 
the affray thus forced upon him James Perte, fighting lawfully in self- 
defence and for the safety of his life, with his sword gave Anthony 
Barnes in the right part of his belly a mortal wound, of which he then 
and there instantly died. G. D. R., 3 Sept, 37 Eliz. 

25 March, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Elizabeth Scott 
late of London spinster, there lying dead : With Verdict that she died 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 22/ 

within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sickness " on the 
23rd inst. after five days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz. 

— April, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Thomas 
Knyvett esq. J.P., of Thomas Lea of London esq. in the sum of 
twenty pounds, and of John Burbadge and Edward Burbadge, both of 
London gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the appear- 
ance of the said John and Edward at the next General Session of the 
Peace for Middlesex, and in the mean time for their peaceful bearing 
towards all people and more especially towards William Craggar of 
St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yoman. G. S. P. R., Easter 37 Eliz. 

II April, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert Scott late 
of London yeoman : With Verdict that the said Robert died within the 
gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sicknesse " on the present 
nth inst. after seven days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz. 

II April, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at St. Martin's-in-the-P'ields co. Midd. on view of the body of John 
Langton late of the said parish cutler : With Verdict that, on the loth 
inst. between three and four p.m., the said John Langton and a cer- 
tain Michael Pinkney late of the same parish, exchanged insulting 
words and had an affray in a certain place of the said parish, Michael 
Pinkney fighting with a rapier and John Langton fighting with a staff; 
in which affray Michael Pinkney with his rapier gave John Langton 
on the upper part of his right arm a mortal wound, of which he died 
within a quarter of an hour. — On his arraignment, acknowledging the 
indictment, Michael Pinkney asked for the book, read like a clerk, and 
was delivered. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz. 

13 April, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of James Seeny late of 
London yeoman : With Verdict that the said James Seeny died within 
the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sicknes " on the present 
13th inst., after three days of illness. G. D. R., 14 April, 37 Eliz. 

21 April, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within the Gaol of Newgate, on view of the body of Mary 
Shaw late of London spinster : With Verdict that the said Mary died 
within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sicknesse '' on the 
20th inst. after eleven days of illness. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz. 

26 April, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Thomas 
Fowler of Islington esq. J. P., of Richard Craddock of St. John's 
Streat co. Midd. locksmith, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said 
Richard Craddock's appearance at the next Session of the Peace in co. 
Midd., to give evidence against John Cromwell, for a certain felony of 
which he is suspected. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz. 

Q 2 



228 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

28 April, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within the Gaol of Newgate on view of the body of William Esson late 
of London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
William died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sick- 
nesse " on the 27th inst., after a day's illness. G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz. 

I May, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within the Gaol of Newgate on view of the body of Richard Wallys 
late of London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Richard died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyning 
sicknesse'' on the 29th of last April, after twelve days' illness. 
G. D. R., 2 May, 37 Eliz. 

31 May, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at the parish of St. Leonard-in-Shordiche co. Midd., on view of the 
body of Nicholas Torapson, there lying dead : With Verdict that the 
said Nicholas, at his dwelling-house in the said parish, died by Divine 
Visitation of the infirmity called "apyninge sicknes" on the 29th inst, 
after three days of illness. G. D. R., 3 Sept.', 37 Eliz. 

28 June, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of Richard Hurste of the parish of St. Buttolph 
without Bushopsgate vintenour, and Thomas Hurste of the parish of 
St. Buttolph without Aldgate merchant-taylor, in the sum of ten 
pounds each, and Teale Magansa van Gulique in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the appearance of the said Teale Magansa van Gulique 
at the next Session for Middlesex, to answer " for a niutineus con- 
spiracy by him and others against Mr. Tice Fersis?" G. D. R., 
10 July, 37 Eliz. 

28 June, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir Owin 
Hopton knt. J. P., of Anthony Wryte of St. Katherin's co. Midd. yeoman 
and John Edwards of Blackefryers London lynnen-draper, in the sum of 
ten pounds each, and of Walter Myhelson of St. Katherin's aforesaid 
joyner, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Walter's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, " for that he was 
charged with the suspicion of stealinge a Signe in St. Katherine's." 
G. D. R., 10 July, 37 Eliz. 

28 June, 37 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Stepney co. Midd. on view of the body of Richard Achan late of 
London gentleman : With verdict that, on the 27th inst. between five 
and six p.m., the said Richard Achan and a certain William Carvell 
late of London gentleman, being together at Stepney in the " London 
fielde," exchanged insulting words, and drawing forth their rapiers 
made an affray with one another, in which affray William Carvell with 
his sword gave Richard Achan a mortal wound, of which he then and 
there instantly died. G. D. R., 3 Sept., 37 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 229 

8 September, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Southall in the 
parish of Heese co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Weekes alias Har- 
trowe late of London gentleman and Thomas Simpson late of London 
yoman, assaulted Thomas Kidwell on the highway, and robbed him of 
forty-six pounds nine shillings and ninepence of numbered money. On 
their arraignment Thomas Sympson put himself ' Guilty ' and was sen- 
tenced to be hung ; but Richard Weekes, standing silent, was committed 
to the peine dure, the clerical memorandum over his name in the bill 
being, " Mutum se tenet Ideo consideratum est per Curiam quod eat ad 
penam duram." G. D. R., 3 Oct., 37 Eliz. 

8 September, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at 
Hampsted co. Midd. and in Warne Lane near the highway leading 
from London to Edgeware, John Hurford alias Marvyn alias Browne 
yoman, and Thomas Simpson yoman, and Richard Weekes alias 
Hartrowe gentleman, all late of London, assaulted George Beer late 
Hampsted laborer ; that the said Thomas Simpson with a dagg charged 
with powder and ball then and there shot the same George Beer in the 
said lane at Wilsdon in Hampsted, giving him on his forehead a 
mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 8 Sept. 37 Eliz. 
to the 13th day of the same month of September, on which last- 
named day he died ; and that John Hurford &c. aforesaid was present 
with the said Thomas Simpson, aiding and encouraging him thus to 
murder George Beere. Putting himself ' Guilty,' George Hurford was 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

13 September, 37 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hampsted co. Midd. on view of the body of George Bere, 
there lying dead : With Verdict that, in the night of the 8th inst. 
between the hours eleven and twelve p.m. the said George Bere was at 
Wilsdon CO. Midd. in God's and the Queen's peace, when he was 
assaulted by Thomas Sympson yoman, Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe 
gentleman and John Marvyn gentleman, all late of London, and that 
with a certain instrument charged with powder and ball Thomas 
Sympson shot the said George Bere in the forehead, giving him a 
mortal wound of which he died on the present 13th inst. ; and Further 
that Richard Weekes alias Hartrowe and John Marvyn were present at 
Wilsdon, aiding and abetting the same Thomas Sympson to commit 
the said felony and murder. On the bill appear clerical memoranda 
that Thomas Sympson put himself ' Guilty,' and was sentenced to be 
hung, that John Marvyn was at large, and that Richard Weekes alias 
Hartrowe held silence, wherefore it was adjudged " quod eat ad penam 
duram." G. D. R., 3 Oct., 37 Eliz. 

21 October, 37 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Young esq. J.P., of George PuUyard of Easte Smithfield co. Midd. 



230 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

shoemaker and Peter Cornellis of the same place knifemaker, in ten 
pounds each, and of Henry Milles of the same place carpenter, in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Henry Milles's appearance at the 
next Session of the Peace, and his forbearance in the meanwhile from 
building a certain new house, lately by him erected in Easte Smithfield 
against the form of the statute in that case provided. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 
38 EHz. 

6 November, 37 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Paddington co. 
Midd. on the said day, Phihp Collyn alias Osborne, late of London 
yoman, stole " vnum equum castratum vocat' a Geldinge " of roane 
colour, worth eight pounds, and a graye geldinge worth eight pounds, 
of the goods and chattels of William Morgan esq. Refusing to speak, 
Philip Collyn was committed to the peine forte et dure. Stat mutus 
Ideo cons' est p' cur' qd. habebit penam fort' et dur'. G. D. R., i Dec, 
40 EHz. 

8 December, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the night of the 
said day between eleven and twelve p.m., Robert Howarde and James 
Greye, both late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the house 
of George Royle at Hadley co. Midd., and stole therefrom a womman's 
gowne trimmed with violet-coloured velvet lace worth five pounds, a 
flannell petticote trimmed with " billament lace " worth thirty shillings, 
a woman's kyrtle trimmed with tawney-coloured " billament lace '' worth 
forty shillings, a woman's kyrtle of puke-colour worth thirteen shillings 
and fourpence, a hatt worth twelve shilUngs, a taffeta apron worth 
twenty shilHngs, a woollen-cloth keverlett worth five pounds, two pairs 
of wemmen's stockens of violet colour worth six shillings, six shirte- 
bandes worth ten shilUngs, a cubbardcloth of " seal " worth ten shillings, 
a child's vestment called a faceclothe worth seven shillings, a gold ring 
worth six shillings and eightpence, six woollen-cloth cushinges worth 
fifty shillings, the valence of a bedd worth three pounds, five woollen- 
cloth curtens worth thirty shillings, " unum parr geminorum argenti 

. . . vocat' a paire of bracelettes of silver innamelled ad valen- 
ciam xiiij. iiii^.," and forty-eight shillings in numbered moneys, of the 
goods and chattels of the said George Royle. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 
38 Eliz. 

7 January, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Paddington co. Midd. 
on the said, day, Thomas Johnson and John Bailey, both late of Lon- 
don yomen, stole a black woollen-cloth cloak worth twenty shillings, 
" vnam sarcinam vocat' a Portmantua " worth twelve pence, three 
linen-cloth shirts worth six shillings, "quatuor collaria panni linei 
vocat' fallinge bandes ad valenciam iii^.," a pair of worstead stockens 
worth three shillings, and a pair of shoes worth twelve pence, of the 
goods and chattels of Richard Fitzames (sic) gentleman. Over the name 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 23 1 

of each thief in the bill appears the clerical memorandum " Cognovit 
indictamentum petit librum legit vt clericus signatur cum litera T et 
deliberatur juxta formam statuti &c."=He acknowledged the indictment, 
asks for the book, reads like a clerk, is marked with the letter T, and 
is delivered according to the form of the statute &c." This precise 
description of the Tyburn brand appears for the first time in the rolls 
of this year. 16 Feb., 38 Eliz. 

21 February, 38 ELizABETH.--True Bill that, on the said day at 
the parish of Maribone, in the highway called " the footepath " in a 
field called " Broomefielde," John Nelson late of London yoman 
assaulted Timothy Bowdrye and robbed him of a pillowbeere worth 
twelve pence, " vnum securim vocat' a handebill " worth twelve pence, 
and twenty-three pence of numbered money. Po se non cul nee rec. 
G. D. R., 20 Jan., 39 Eliz. 

15 March, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Tyler late of Westminster yoman feloniously 
and traitorously coined and counterfeited two pieces of coin of copper 
and other false and mixed metals, in the image and similitude of the 
Queen's money called shillinges. At the foot of the bill, a memoran- 
dum that John Tyler put himself ' Guilty ' ; whereupon it was adjudged 
that he should be led by the Sheriff of Middlesex to Newgate, and 
thence should be drawn through the middle of the city of London to 
the gallows at Tyburn, and be hung on the same gallows (et abinde per 
medium civitat' London direct' vsq' ad furcas de tiborne trahatur, Et 
super furcas illas ibidem suspendatur per collum quousque &c." — 
Together with the Precept of " Venire Facias " directed to the Sheriff 
of Middlesex, for good and loyal men for jurors (showing that the case 
was taken by itself at the Castell in St. Johnstrete on 2 7 May 38 
Eliz., before Sir Richard Marten knt. and other Justices of the Peace 
and of Oyer and Terminer), and the list and panel of jurors, this bill 
is on a separate file. S. S. O. T. 27 May, 38 Eliz. 

I May, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Alveria Kellett of the 
parish of St. Clement's-Danes co. Midd. widow, for not going to 
church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from i May 38 
EUz. to 26th of June then next following. G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Eliz. 

7 May, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Oldestreete co. Midd. 
during the night of the said day, James Curke alias Lee, late of Lon- 
don yoman, broke burglariously into the house of Philipp Awdsley 
gentleman, and stole therefrom a woman's black-silk gowne worth eight 
pounds, two ruife-bandes, a leather purse with twenty shillings of 
numbered money in it, and a silver pott worth five pounds. Acknow- 
ledging the indictment James Curke was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R, . . . ., 38 Ehz. 



232 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

10 May, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Shordiche co. Midd. 
on the said day, Cristofer Manson and Edward Weste, both late of 
London yomen, stole six pounds of sugar worth four shillings, eight 
poun<is of cheese worth twenty pence, twenty yards of " cruell garther- 
inge " wofth twenty pence, four pounds of almonds worth twenty pence, 
and six dozen "poyntes " worth eight pence, of the goods and chattels 
of Thomas Prentice. Both thieves put themselves ' Guilty,' and 
pleading their clergy, were marked with the letter T and delivered 
according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 38 Eliz. 

21 May, 38 ELizABETH.^True Bill that, in the parish of St. 
Andrew in Highe Holborne co. Midd. on the said day between the 
hours eight and ten a.m., Samuell Gower late of London gentleman 
entered the house of Thomas Rooper esq. and stole therefrom a 
satten dublett worth forty shillings and " vnum par' calligarum velvetti 
cum serico ornaf vocat' a payre of veluett breches with canyons 
plucked out with satten valoris quadraginta solidorum." Acknowledg- 
ing the indictment, Samuell Gower asked for the book, read like a clerk, 
was marked with the letter T, and was delivered according to the form 
of the statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 38 Eliz. 

29 May, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, t3.ken before Thomas 
Flemynge esq. Solicitor-General, of John Holcroft of Kilseth co. Lan- 
caster esq., and of Robert Shawe of Traforde co. Lancaster gentleman, 
in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and of Gilbert Worsley of 
London gentleman in the sum of two hundred pounds ; For the said 
Gilbert Worsley's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, 
then and there to answer to such things as may be objected against 
him. G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Ehz. 

29 May, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before William 
Hickman J.P., of Richard Slater of Bishoppe Hattfield co. Hertford 
yoman, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Richard's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace to be held in Middlesex, to give 
evidence against Silvester Caulton gentleman. G. D. R., 2 July, 
38 Eliz. 

8 June, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before George 
Assebye esq. J.P., of John Gregorye of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 
barbour and William Wright of the same parish cochemaker, in the 
sum of ten pounds each, and of George Genefer of the same parish 
joyner, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said George's appearance 
at the next Session of Enquiry for Middlesex, to answer " for detayn- 
ing of lynnen laide to gage, togeather with the principall monys borowed 
and the Interest all paide, of the goodes of Peter Rowlandson, and 
yet the said Genefer kepes the pawn." G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Eliz. 

10 June, 38 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, on the said day, between 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 233 

six and seven p.m., on the highway at Southmymmes co. Midd., 
Lawrence WiUiams late of London yeoman with a drawn rapiour 
assaulted John Crosbye, then being in God's and the Queen's peace, 
and with malice aforethought slew and murdered the same John 
Crosbye. G. D. R., 11 May, 39 Eliz. 

15 June, 38 Elizabeth.— Recognizance, taken before Thomas 
Fowler esq. J. P., of John Ryley of Staple Inne gentleman in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John's appearance at the next 
Session of the Peace for Midd., to give evidence against Francis More, 
suspected of felony. G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Eliz. ' 

16 June, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Thomas 
Fowler esq. J. P., of William Goares of Harberowghe co. Lecester 
gentleman and Christopher Wilkes of IsHngton co. Midd. vintener, in the 
sum of ten pounds each, and of William Watton of Islington "inkeeper,'' 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said William Walton's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace in Middlesex, and in the mean 
time for his peaceful behaviour. At the foot of the bill, this 
memorandum, — "Wheatley and this Watton did fight, and theare 
weare fower more with weapons of their companye broughte before 
me, but whether they weare present wid any thing att their fightinge, it 
is to be enquired if theye did then make (?) a ryott, and therefore I did 
binde the six to be of good behaviour." — Also, on the same file, the 
recognizances referred to in the aforegiven memorandum. Wheteley 
alias Wheatley was of the parish of Christechurche near Newegate, 
pewterer. G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Eliz. 

16 June, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Wrothe esq. J. P., of Sir Edward Monnynges of Waldisheen (?) co. 
Kent knt. and his servant John Sanson, in the sum of twenty pounds 
each ; For the said John Sanson's appearance at the next Session of 
Enquiry at Finsburye. G. D. R., 2 July, 38 Eliz. 

27 July, 38 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Edward 
Vaghan esq. J. P., of Henry Hunte of St. Leonard's parish in 
Shordich gardiner, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Henry's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to answer to 
a charge of " stealinge of artichokes." G. D. R., i Sept., 
38 Eliz. 

4 August, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Kentishetowne co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Freeman late of London yoman stole a 
grey trottinge geldinge worth five pounds, an amblinge geldinge worth 
five pounds, a browne baye geldinge worth three pounds, and another 
castrated horse called " a black nagge " worth forty shilHngs, of the 

goods and chattels of John Gotten esq Also, two other 

indictments (endorsed " Billa Vera ") against the same John Freeman 



234 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

for thefts committed at Kentishetowne on the same day. G. D. R., 
1 Sept., 38 Eliz. 

30 September, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill against William Whitinge 
of Stepney co. Midd. butcher, for not going to church, chapel or any 
usual place of Common Prayer, from 30 Sept. 38. Eliz. to i January, 
then next following. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 39 Eliz. 

6 October, 38 Elizabeth. — True Bill against William Bensheforde 
late of Westminster co. Midd. yoman, for not going to church, chapel 
or any usual place of Common Prayer, from 6 Oct. 38 Eliz. to 
6 October of the next following year. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 39 Eliz. 

23 November, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pickthatche co. 
Midd. on the said day and for six months next before it, Elizabeth 
HoUande kept a common brothel. Elizabeth Hollande put her- 
self 'Guilty'; and it was adjudged by the Courte that "she shalbe 
put into a carte at Newgate and be carted with a paper on her hed 
shewinge her offence, from thence to Smythfeilde, from thence to her 
howse, from thence to Cornehill, from thence to the Standerd in 
Cheepe, from thence to Bridewell, and all the waye basons to be runge 
before her, at Bridewell to be punished, and from thence to be broughte 
to Newgate, there to remaine vntill she haue payed a fyne of xlli. 
and put in sewerties for the same, and to be bounde to her good 
behaviour." G. D. R., 16 Feb., 39 Eliz. 

10 December, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Hollowell Streete in St. Leonard's Shoredich co Midd., on 
view of the body of James Feake, there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the aforesaid James Feake and a certain Gabriel Spencer late of 
London yoman were together in the said parish at the dwelling-house 
of Richard Easte barber, on the 3rd instant between five and six p.m., 
when they exchanged insulting words, whereupon James Feake, having 
a copper-candlestick in his right hand, held it with the intention of 
throwing it at Gabriel Spencer, who, having his rapier in its scabbard, 
with the same rapier and scabbard gave the said James between the 
ball of his right eye and the eyebrow a mortal wound, which penetrated 
to the brain, of which wound the said James Feake languished from the 
said 3rd inst. at Hollowell Street to the 6th inst., on which last-named 
day he died of the said wound. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 39 Ehz. 

28 December, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Thomas 
Fowler esq. J.P., of Fulke Rutter of Islington co. Midd. gentleman 
and Richard Chambers of St. Olive's parish in Sowthwark co. Surrey 
habberdasher, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance 
of Margaret Rutter, wife of the said Fulke Rutter, at the next Gaol 
Delivery, to answer to a suspicion of felony. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 39 Eliz. 

30 December, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day in 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 235 

Paddington co. Midd. on a certain bridge called " Stonebridge," John 
Moore and Francis Palmer, both late of London yomen, assaulted 
John Apshawe and robbed him of eight shillings in numbered money. 
— Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same two highwaymen, 
for assaulting Thomas Mawborne at the same Stone Bridge on the 
same day, and robbing him of eleven shilUngs and sixpence of 
numbered money. Putting themselves ' Guilty ' of both robberies, 
both robbers were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 20 Jan., 
39 Eliz. 

I January, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pickthatche co. 
Midd. on the said day and through six months next before the same 
day. Prudence Crispe alias Drewrye alias Wingfeild kept a common 
brothel, thereby causing many unlawful assemblies and atrocious riots 
&c., to the disquiet and scandal of the inhabitants of Pickthatche, and 
of others the Queen's lieges. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Prudence Crispe 
was sentenced " to be had to Newgate, and ther to be put into a carte, 
from thence to be carted to Smithefielde, from thence to her howse, 
from thence to Cornehill, and from thence to the Standard in Cheepe, 
so to Bridewell, then to be whipped, then to Newgate and fined 
at xl li. and to be bounde to her goode behaviour." G. D. R., 20 Jan., 
39 Eliz. 

7 January, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Candeler esq. J.P., of Walter Medcalfe constable of Norton-folgate 
CO. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Walter's appearance 
at the next Session of the Peace held in Middlesex, "for that hetooke 
from one William Jackson iii li. in mony a gold ringe and other thinges, 
when as the said Jackson was sent to prison for suspicion of felloney, 
and wold deliver him none of his money to releve him in prison, 
beinge commaunded to doe the same j for that Jackson made his peticon 
he was redy to famishe in prison for want of releif." G. D. R., 
20 Jan., 39 Eliz. 

6 February, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the dwelling-house 
of a certain Thomas Andrewes at Edmonton co. Midd., Joan Gamble 
late of Edmonton aforesaid secretly gave birth to a male infant, living 
at the time of birth, and forthwith with the intention of murcjering it 
crushed and broke in the left part of its head, and so murdered it. 
Putting herself 'Guilty,' Joan Gamble was sentenced to be hung. 
G. D. R., 16 Feb., 39 Eliz. 

II February, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day, 
Richard Broomeley and Thomas Bowyer, both late of Clarkenwell co. 
Midd. yomen, gave to Polidore Longe late of London yoman certain 
counters of copper called " Cowpers," and by asserting to the same 

. Polidore that the same copper counters were pieces of coined gold, re- 



236 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

ceived from him ten shillings of lawful money, of which the same Richard 
and Thomas thus defrauded him. G. D. R., . . . ., 39 Ehz. 

13 March, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pynnor co. Midd. 
on the said day, Reginald Gurney late of London yoman stole two 
white sheep worth thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
John Edline. Acknowledging the indictment, Reginald Gurney asked 
for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and 
was delivered according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., 
. . . .,39 Eliz. 

26 March, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Elizabeth Walter {sic} 

of Ickenham co. Midd. spinster and her servant Margaret , 

spinster, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Com- 
mon Prayer, from 26 March 39 Eliz. to the 26th of June, then next 
following. ^ — Also, a similar True Bill on the same file against Anne (sic) 
Pluckett wife of Oliver Pluckett of Highe Holborne co. Midd. yoman 
alias Anne Pluckett of the said place spinster, William Woodfall of 
Highe Holborne yoman ; and Frances Burton widow, James Puddon 
yoman, and Salomon Lowe cardemaker, all three of St. Leonard's, 
Shorediche, for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer, 
from 25 Dec. 39 Ehz. to 26th of June then next following. G. D. R., 
27 July, 39 Eliz. 

15 April, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Ralph 
Waller esq. J.P., of Henry Carter of Westminster co. Midd. chirurgion, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Henry Carter's appearance 
at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to prefer a 
bill of indictment against John George alias Jones of St. Johnstreet 
CO. Midd. " for breaking open a box of the said Henry and takinge 
out of the same a peece of unicorne home, whiche he valued at forty 
powndes." G. D. R., 11 May, 39 Eliz. 

28 April, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Twickenham co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Prince late of Istleworth co. Midd. shot and 
killed pigeons with a handgun charged with powder and hailshott, 
against the form of a certain statute of 2 Edward VI. G. D. R., 
II May, 39 Eliz. 

4 May, 39 Elizabeth.— Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
at Islington co. Midd. on view of the body of William Thomas, late 
of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the night 
of the 3rd inst. between eleven and twelve p.m. the said William 
Thomas, in a certain highway at Islington leading towards Highgate, 
lay in wait for a certain John CorneUs late of London cowper, and 
with his sword drawn made an assault on him with the intention of 
murdering him, whereupon the said John Cornelis having in his hand 
a weapon called " a birding piece," charged with gonpowder and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 237 

haleshott, in self-defence and for the preservation of his life discharged 
the said piece in the breast of the said William Thomas, thereby 
giving the same William a mortal wound of which he died instantly. 
G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

15 May, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Harrison, late of London yoman stole a 
baye gelding worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
William Sandes esq. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

17 May, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Richard 
Candeler esq. J. P., of John Godfry of Endfild co. Midd. laborer, in 
the sum of ten pounds ; For the appearance of his wife, Agnes 
Godfrey, at the next Session of the Peace in Middlesex, to answer 
&c. " for that she is accused by certaine of the neighbours for sus- 
picion of witchcrafte." G. D. R., 17 June, 39 Eliz. 

18 May, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in a certain close called 
Bastian's Close in the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate on the 
said day, Edward Harwood late of London gentleman assaulted Adam 
Crosby gentleman, and then and there with a sword gave him a 
mortal blow, of which he died instantly. On his arraignment Edward 
Harwood put himself ' Not Guilty ' of murder, but ' Guilty ' of man- 
slaughter, and on asking for the book read like a clerk, whereupon he 
was branded with the letter T, and delivered according to the statute 
&c. G. D. R., 17 June, 39 EHz. 

7 June, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sowthmyms co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Shelley late of London yoman, stole a white- 
grey gelding worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Francis 
Normans. — Also, on the same file, a True Bill that, at Sowthmyms co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Shelley late of London yoman stole 
a brown mare worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Thomas Smytheson. — Acknowledging both indictments, Thomas 
Shelley was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 June, 39 Eliz. 

9 June, 39 Elizabeth.- — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within the Gaol of Newgate, on view of the body of William Foorde, 
late of London yoman : With Verdict, that the said William died 
within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sicknes," after a 
day's illness. G. D. R., 17 June, 39 Ehz. 

20 June, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Preston late of 
London yeoman : With Verdict that the said John died within the 
gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sicknes " on the said 20th 
inst,, after a fortnight's illness. G. D. R, 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

20 June, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Highe Holborne co. 
Midd. on the said day, Richard Tompson late of London yoman 



238 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Stole a woollen-clothe cloak of " myngle coUour " worth thirty shillings, 
and a rapiour worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Edward 
Giles. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

20 June, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jo. Croke 
J. P. Recorder of London, of George Scarlett of St. Giles's-without- 
Creplegate merchant taylor and John Harrison of St. Sepulchre's 
CO. Midd. taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds each ; For the appear- 
ance of Elizabeth Jones, wife of Richard Jones of St. Sepulchre's 
aforesaid clothworker, at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. 
G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

22 June, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at High Holborne on 
the said day, Thomas Goddard, John Cooper, John Younge and 
Nycholas Symons, all late of London yomen, stole " a payre of satten 
hose laced over with golde lace, colour flamecuUer " worth thirty 
pounds, of the goods and chattels of John Fit?williams gentleman. 
G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

14 July, 39 Elizabeth.^ — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Margaret Yardly late of 
London spinster : With Verdict that she died within the gaol by 
Divine Visitation of "a pyning sicknes" on the said 14th inst., after 
three weeks of illness. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

19 July, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Jno. Croke 
J.R Recorder of London, John Wrighte of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West of 
London sadler and Laurence Lee of the parish of St. Laurence Poult- 
ney cloth-worker, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Thomas 
Tomlinson of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. sadler, in the sum of one 
hundred pounds ; For the said Thomas's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

22 July, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Yonge, late of 
London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that on the said 22nd 
inst. John Yonge died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a 
pyneinge sicknes," after a month's illness. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 EUz. 

23 July, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Carter, late of 
London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said John 
died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sicknes '' on 
the said 23rd inst. after a week's illness. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

24 JuLY,^39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of Thomas Ashmore, late 
of London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Thomas died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyning sicknes" 
on the 23rd inst., after six days of illness. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 239 

28 July, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol, on view of the body of John Oldham late of 
London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said John 
died in the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge disease " on the 
27th inst., after four days of illness. G. D. R., 27 July, 39 Eliz. 

3 August, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Helen Spokes spinster alias Helen wife of 
William Spokes of the said parish practised certain impious and 
detestable arts, called witchcraftes enchauntementes charmes andsoceries, 
against and upon Anne Whitworthe the wife of James Whitworthe of 
the said parish, from which the said Anne sickened and languished till 
the 13th day of the same month, when she died of the same arts. Po 
se non cul nee rec. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 39 Eliz. 

10 August, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the parish of St. 
Dunstan-in-le-West of London on the said day, George Knappe, 
Michael Ballett and Roger Marshall, all late of London yomen, 
assaulted Richard Holderneyes late of London yoman, being in God's 
and the Queen's peace, and that Roger Marshall with a sword gave the 
said Holderneyes on his left breast a mortal wound, of which he lan- 
guished at St. Andrew's in Holborn from the said loth of August to 
the 15 th of September then next following, when he died of the said 
blow ; and that George Knappe and Michael Ballett were present at 
the said murder, and aiding and abetting Roger Marshall to commit it. 
George Knappe and Roger Marshall were at large : Michael Ballett, 
putting himself ' Not Guilty ' of murder but ' Guilty ' of manslaughter, 
asked for the book, read like a clerk and was marked with the letter T, 
but was remanded by the Court for good sureties, for his good behaviour. 
G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

22 August, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken at Salop co. 
Salop before Sir William Peryam knt. Chief Baron of the Exchequer 
and Mathew Ewens one of the Barons of the Exchequer 
(the Queen's Justices for taking the Assize of Gaol Delivery in co. 
Salop) of Phillip de Smethcott of co. Salop gentleman, Richard 
Lloyd of Hardewick co. Salop gentleman, and William Wellyns of 
Wescott CO. Salop gentleman, in the sum of one hundred marks 
each, and of Richard Phillippes of Smethcott co. Salop gentle- 
man, in the sum of two hundred pounds ; For the said Richard 
Phillippes's appearance at the next General Gaol Delivery of Newgate 
to be held after the 9th of October next coming, then and there to 
answer to those things that may be objected against him. G. D. R., 
I Dec, 40 Eliz. 

24 August, 39 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Travers late of the said parish vintener 



240 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Stole two hundred and twelve yards of woollen cloth called " Checkers " 
worth . . . ., ninety yards of black Irisherugges worth . . . ., 
certain Irish mantles worth forty shilHngs, thirty yards of woollen cloth 
(pannilanei) called " Whyte Gotten " worth . . . ., and forty yards 
of woollen cloth called "Whyte Celter." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 39 Eliz. 

26 August, 39 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of William Gibbes, 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
William died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pininge sick- 
nes" on the 25th inst, after six days of illness. G. D. R., . . . .,39 Eliz. 

31 August, 39 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at HoUowell in St. 
Leonard's of Shoredich on the said day, Daniel Burney alias Burne- 
well late of London alien assaulted Rachel Delalander, an infant of 
seven years in age, " et eandem Rachaelem tunc et ibidem felonice 
rapuit, defloravit et carnaliter cognovit." Putting himself ' Guilty,' 
Daniel Burney was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 
39 Eliz. 

27 September, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Henry 
Thoresby esq. J. P., of John South of Southwark co. Surrey card- 
maker; For the said John South's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace in Middlesex, — "for that he the sayd John, 
having an other wief, was suspiciously taken in a chamber with one 
Elizabeth Greene." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 39 Eliz. 

30 September, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Henry 
Thoresby esq. J.P., of John Ellis of London citizen and freemason ; 
For the said John's appearance at the next General Session of the 
Peace for Middlesex, to answer to what shall be then and there 
objected against him by Margaret Showard. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 
39 Eliz. 

2 October, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sunberye co. Midd. 
on the said day, Robert Beckenfeilde late of London yoman stole "a 
blewe cow " worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas 
Gosten. G. D. R., i Dec, 40 Eliz.. 

16 October, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Mathew 
Dale and Richard Blunte esqs., J. P., of Edward Holmes jun'. of Dand 
(? Dane) Inne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of two hundred 
pounds, and of Edward Holmes (father of the said Edward Holmes 
jun'.) of the parish of Christchurche in London freemason and Edward 
Robartes of Whitechappell co. Midd. freemason, in the sum of one 
hundred pounds each ; For the appearance of the said Edward Holmes 
jun'. at the next Gaol Delivery to be held in Middlesex, then and there 
to answer to those things that shall be objected against him. G. D. R., 
I Dec, 40 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 24I 

16 October, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Mathew 
Dale and Richard Blunte esqs. and J. P., of Henry Riche of All Saints'- 
in-Breadstreate merchant, in the sum of two hundred pounds, and of 
William Riche (brother of the said Henry) haberdasher and William 
Prastley merchant, both of All Saints'-in-Breadstreate, in the sum of 
one hundred pounds each ; For the said Henry Riche's appearance 
at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to answer 
to such things as shall be objected against him. G. D. R., i Dec, 
40 Eliz. 

26 October, 39 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir John 
Popham knt. Chief Justice &c., of Thomas Skriven of St. Giles's-in- 
the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman and Henry Kellawaie of St. Sepul- 
chre's in London, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For their appear- 
ance at the next Gaol Delivery for the city of London and the county 
of Middlesex, to give evidence against Richard Webbe, suspected of 
" stealing from the Earle of Rutlandes certeine parcels of linnen." 
G. D. R., I Dec, 40 EHz. 

28 October, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on the said day, John Goode late of London yoraan 
stole " vnam peciam auri vocat' a Soueraigne ad valenciam xs." and ten 
shillings in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of 
Dennis Devorex. G. D. R., i Dec, 40 EUz. 

30 October, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Evan Fludde of 
Goldingelane co. Midd. porter, for not going to church, chapel or any 
usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 30th of Oct. 39 Eliz. to 
4 October 41 Elizabeth. G. D. R., . . . .,41 Eliz. 

12 November, 39 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Grayes Inne of 
St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd. on the night of the said day be- 
tween nine and ten p.m., Richard Aunger jun'. of the said parish gen- 
tleman and his wife Agnes Aunger, and Edward Ingram of the same 
parish laborer, made an assault on Richard Aunger sen', esq. of Grayes 
Inne father of the said Richard Aunger jun'. aforesaid, and, with the 
intention of killing him by strangulation, with their hands violently 
broke, twisted and strangled' the neck of the same Richard Aunger sen', 
esq., so that he then and there died. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' 
Richard Aunger gentleman and his wife Agnes were sentenced to be 
hung. Of Edward Ingram it is recorded in a clerical note on the bill 
" Po se non cul nee rec." G. D. R., . . . ., 39 Eliz. 

24 November, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmyllstreete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Edward Edwardes late of London yoman 
assaulted Robert Chaundler, being then and there in God's and the 
Queen's peace, and with a knife gave him a mortal blow, of which he 
languished from the said 24th of November to the 9th of March then 



242 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 

next following at Hendon, on which last-named day he died at Hendon 
of the said blow. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Edward Edwardes was 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

25 November, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bednall-grene co. 
Midd. on the night of the said day, John Geoffrey alias Cowper of 
London plaisterer broke into the close and house of William Sebright 
esq. and stole therefrom six hundred pounds weight of sheet lead, 
worth three pounds six shillings and eight pence. G. D. R., i Dec, 
40 Eliz. 

30 November, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill against the Lady Kathe- 
rine Cornewallis wife of Sir . . . . Cornewallis of Highe Hol- 
borne co. Midd. knt., the Lady Margaret wife of Sir Henry Constable 
of Clarkenwell co. Midd. knt., and Richard Carrowe gentleman and 
William Woodfall taylor, both of Highe Holborne aforesaid ; For not 
going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer from the 
said 30th of Nov. to 3 1 May then next following. — Also, similar True 
Bill against Agnes Mylles of Stanmer co. Midd. spinster and Lucy 
Cole late of Heston co. Midd. spinster, for not going to any usual 
place of Common Prayer from 26 March 40 Eliz. to 27 th of May, then 
next following. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

I December, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Lincolnes Inne 
Feildes in the parish of St. Dunstain-in-the-West of London and near 
the highway there on the said day, Thomas Thoresbye late of London 
gentleman and Roger Fitzhughes late of London gentleman, and 
Francis Wakefeilde late of London yoman, assaulted and beat Thomas 
Sone and robbed him of one hundred pounds of numbei:ed money. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Thoresbye gentleman was sentenced 
to be hung; the other two highwaymen were at large. G. D. R., 
29 March, 40 Eliz. 

20 January, 40 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Agnes Knappe late 
of London spinster, there lying dead : With Verdict that she died in 
the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sicknes " on the i8th inst. 
after six days of illness. G. D. R., 29 March, 40 EUz. 

17 February, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Stonebridge 
in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd., John Frauncis late 
of London yoman assaulted Samuel Morris, and robbed him of a 
graye horse worth forty shillings, eight hundred egges worth forty 
shillings, three dead mallardes worth three shillings, a dead teale worth 
six-pence, seven dead larkes worth seven pence, two dead hennes worth 
three shillings, a black woollen-cloth cloak worth nine shillings, and 
twenty-two pence in numbered money. John Frauncis was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R , 29 March, 40 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 243 

17 February, 40 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on the said day, James Savadge late of London yoman 
assaulted William Davies, being in God's and the Queen's peace, and 
with a sword gave him on the fore part of his head a mortal wound, of 
which he languished from the said 17 th of February to the 8th of 
March next following, when he died of the said blow at the afore- 
said parish. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' of manslaughter, James 
Savadge put himself ' Guilty ' of killing William Davies in self-defence. 
G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

28 February, 40 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Katherine's co. 
Midd. on the said day, Edward Steward gentleman, John Fynch yoman, 
William Askewe yoman, and .... Ballard yoman, all late of 
London, entered the dwelling-house of John Soper, and stole therefrom 
a silver-gilt " salte " worth thirty-five shillings, a parcel-gilt silver " bole " 
worth fifty-two shillings, a silver " bekar '' worth forty shillings, a' silver 
cuppe worth thirty-three shillings, another silver " bole " worth thirty- 
three shillings and eight pence, a dozen silver spoones worth three 
pounds and thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of John 
Soper ; and a parcel-gilt goblett worth fifty shillings of the goods and 
chattels of Morgain Jones ; and a silver-gilt salt worth forty shillings of 
the goods and chattels of Hugh Whitbrooke. Steward and Finch were 
sentenced to be hung : the other two thieves were at large. G. D. R., 
29 March, 40 Eliz. 

28 February, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hollowaie in St. 
Leonard's parish at Shordiche on the said day, Bartholomew Adams 
yoman, Stephen Caver alias Willson yoman, Edmund Graye servant of 
William Hodgeskins of London baker, Thomas Needeham servant of 
Andrew Huntingdon of London baker, John Symons seirvant of 
William Hodgeskins of London baker, John Hickman servant of 
Thomas Adlington of Bushe Lane clothworker, and George Acourte of 
Mary Aldermanburie cordewayner, with other disturbers of the peace 
to the number of a hundred persons broke riotously into the dwelling- 
house of John Harris at Hollowaie aforesaid, and injured and broke 
"the chambers and roomes" of the said house. Bartholomew Adams, 
Stephen Caver, Thomas Nedeham and John Symons were found 
' Guilty ' ; wherefore it was adjudged by the Court that they should be 
taken to Newgate, whipt in their Halls (in awlis suis) and remain in 
prison during the pleasure of the Court. Edmund Graye, John Hick- 
man and George Acorte were found ' Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 29 March, 
40 Eliz. 

8 March, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes 
without the bar of the New Temple on the said day, William Edwardes 
late of London yoman stole a velvett footeclothe worth five pounds, 

R 2 



244 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

and a velvet vestment called "a furniture of hare-coloured velvett " 
worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas Wrighte. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' William Edwardes asked for the book, read 
like a clerk, was marked with the letter T and delivered according to the 
form of the Statute. G. D. R., 29 March, 40 Eliz. 

20 March, 40 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Thomas Mantell 
late of London yeoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Thomas died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of "a pyninge sick- 
nes," on the 19th inst., after thirteen days of illness. G. D. R., 
29 March, 40 Eliz. 

24 March, 40 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Jonas Pierson, there 
lying dead : With Verdict that the said Jonas died within the gaol by 
Divine Visitation of " a pyninge sicknes " on the 23rd inst. after seven 
days of illness. G. D. R., 29 March, 40 EHz. 

28 March, 40 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert Beckinfield 
late of St. John's Streete co. Midd. yeoman : With Verdict that the 
said Robert died within the gaol by Divine Visitation of " a pyninge 
sicknes ''on the 26th inst. after three weeks of illness. G. D. R., 
29 March, 40 Eliz. 

7 May, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the parish of St. Giles- 
without-Creplegate on the said day, Robert Hudson late of London 
gentleman assaulted Simon Askewe " in the feilde on the backside of 
the Peste House " of the said parish, and with a rapiour gave him on 
his right breast a blow of which he died instantly. Putting himself 
' Not Guilty ' of manslaughter, Robert Hudson put himself ' Guilty ' 
of killing in self-defence. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

2 June, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J. P., of Anne Arrundell of St Giles's-without-Creplegate, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For her appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery, to give evidence against Geoffrey Welsh and his wife Anne 
and Thomas Norman pewterer and Maria Wills wife of WilUam Wills, 
"towching poysen geven to children." G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

4 June, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in a certain close of St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields near St. James's Park, Edward Griffen late of the 
said parish locksmith, on the said day between two and three p.m., 
assaulted John Feylder, being in God's and the Queen's peace, and 
" did wreste and strangle " the said John, putting his knee on the said 
John's neck and twisting it until he had murdered him by suffocating 
him. Confessing the indictment, Edward Griffen was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 245 

4 June, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J. P., of Mary Norton of St. Buttolph's-within-Bisshops- 
gate CO. Midd. widow, in the sum of forty pounds ; For her appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace, to give evidence against 
Robert Weston and Joan Grove, " suspected to be accessarie to the 
stealing of the Countesse of Rutlandes plate." G. D. R., 7 July, 
40 Eliz. 

6 June, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir John 
Popham knt. Chief Justice &c., of John Warren of St. Andrew's in 
Holborne haberdasher and Thomas Shelley of the parish of the 
Savoy CO. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of 
Aron HoUande of the parish of the Savoy co. Midd. inholder, in the 
sum of one hundred pounds ; For the said Aron Hollande's appearance 
at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

10 June, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherine's co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Peirson late of the said place yoman 
assaulted Thomas Holden, being in God's and the Queen's peace, 
and with a knife gave him in " his bellie " a blow and wound two 
thumbs' breadths {i.e. inches) in depth and one inch in breadth. Con- 
fessing the indictment, John Peirson was fined twenty shillings. 
G. D. R, 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

20 June, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir John 
Popham knt. Chief Justice &c., of Patrick Derrick of St. Martin's 
in-the-Fields sadler and Walter Savadge of St. Sepulchre's in London 
inholder in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Daniel Savage, one 
of the Serjeants of the Queen's Great Chamber, in the sum of one 
hundred pounds ; For the said Daniel's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery for the city of London and the county of- Middlesex. 
G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

23 June, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sheerelane co. Midd. 
on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John 
Forster of Sheerelane aforesaid clothworker threw divers unclean 
matters, called " filthie pottes " and " chamberfilthe," into the said lane. 
G. D. R., 10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

25 June, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Grayes-Inne-Lane' 
CO. Midd. on the said day Hugh Walton late of London yoman 
assaulted Edmund Ballington, being in God's and the Queen's peace, 
and with a dagger gave him on his left hand a mortal wound, of which 
he languished from the said 25th of June to the last day of the same 
month at Grayes-Inne-Lane, on which last-named day he died of the 
said wound.. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Hugh Walton was sentenced to 
be hung. G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

2 July, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chiswellstreete in St. 



246 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Giles's parish-without-Creplegate co. Midd. on the said day, John Cooke 
late of London yoman " fuit persona otiosus et vagrans vt miles 
anglice as a souldiour .... and had not settled himself in 
aliquo servicio labore vel alio legittimo cursu vite." John Cooke put 
himself 'Guilty,' and was remanded before judgment. G. D. R., 
7 July, 40 Eliz. 

3 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before George 
Asshebye esq. J.P., of William Watkins of Creswell co. Hereford 
yeoman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Henry Foxe of Westmin- 
ster CO. Midd. yoman and Henry Kettlewood of the same city yeoman 
in the sum of twenty pounds each ; For the appearance of the same 
Henry Foxe and Henry Kettlewood at next Session of Enquiry for 
Middlesex, to answer " touching their behaviour abowt the matter of 
arrest and resquor in Mr. Masteres howse at the Bell in Westminster." 
— Also, Recognizances, taken before the same Justice, for the appear- 
ance , of David Powell of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields glover and Hugh 
Adowhurt late of London yeoman at the next Session of the Peace to 
answer &c. " towching their abuse about an arrest of Henry Kettle- 
wood at the Sighn of the Bell in Westminster." G. D. R., 7 July, 
40 Eliz. 

7 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Information, by John Parsons of London 
yoman, against Hugh Traps of St. James's parish at Clarkenwell co. 
Midd. gentleman, for keeping on i May 40 Elizabeth and nineteen 
several days between the said ist of May and the said 7th of July, 
at the aforesaid parish " a comon howse alley or place of Bowling 
. . . . for his gaine lucre and living." G. D. R., 7 July, 40 Eliz. 

8 July, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. by 
the river Thames on the said day, William Sabyne late of London 
waterman assaulted WilHam Aberyn, and with a piece of wood called 
" a scull " gave him on the right part of his head a mortal blow, of 
which he languished from the said 8th of July until the 25th of the 
same month, when he died of the same blow. Putting himself ' Guilty ' 
of manslaughter, William Sabyne asked for the book, read like a clerk, 
was marked with the letter T, and was delivered according to the form 
of the statute. G. D. R., 10 Aug, 40 Eliz. 

10 July, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes 
without the Bars of the New Temple, Mary Dixson late of London 
spinster broke into the dwelling-house of Edward Price and stole 
therefrom eighteen fallinge bandes of linen cloth, worth eighteen shill- 
ings. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Mary Dixson pleaded pregnancy : found 
by a jury of matrons to be ' Not Pregnant,' she was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., 10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

1 1 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Croke, 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 247 

Recorder of London, of William Jones of Lambeth co. Surrey gentle- 
man and Robert Ryche of St. Dunstan's-in-le-West of London taylor, in 
the sum of forty pounds each, and of Susanna Boulton of St Botolph's- 
without-Bishopgate, in the sum of one hundred marks ; For the said 
Susanna's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 
10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

13 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Croke, 
Recorder of London, of WiUiam Jones of Lambeth co. Surrey gentle- 
man and Robert Ryche of St. Dunstan's-in-le-West of London taylor, 
in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Jane Jackson of St. Botolph's- 
without-Bishopsgate widow, in the sum of one hundred marks ; For 
the said Jane's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. 
G. D. R., 10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

20 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Robert 
Wrothe esq. J. P., of Henry Sacheverill of RatclyfF co. Notingham 
esq. and Thomas Standishe of the county of Lyncoln gentleman, in 
the sum of forty pounds each, and of John Gaynsford (servant of the 
said Henry Sacheverill) in the sum of one hundred marks ; For the 
said John Gaynsford's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for 
Middlesex. 

25 July, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields on the said day, Thomas Williams late of London yoman 
assaulted Thomas Connowaye, being in God's and the Queen's peace, 
and with a knife gave him on the left shoulder a mortal wound, of 
which he then and there died instantly. Putting himself ' Guilty ' of 
the murder, Thomas Williams was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

27 July, 40 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Henry 
Thoresby esq. J. P., of William Williamson of Stepney co. Midd. 
" aqua vitae stiller " and Philip Jones of Milende co. Midd. brazier in 
the sum of five pounds each, and of William Jones of Stepney afore- 
said brazier, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said William Jones's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex. G. D. R., 
10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

I August, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. John's Strete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Joan Smithe late of London spinster stole 
two linen-cloth collars called " ruffe bands " worth ten shillings, a 
leather purse trimmed with golde lace worth two shillings, and forty 
shillings in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of 
Alexander Harrison. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Joan Smithe pleaded 
pregnancy : found ' Not Pregnant ' by a jury of matrons, she was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D. R., 10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

5 August, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill, at Holborne co. Midd. on 



248 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the night of the said day between eleven and twelve o'clock, Paul 
Bonton late of London yoman and Margaret Chappell broke burglari- 
ously into the house of Richard Wigginton, with the intention of 
murdering him. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' Paul and Margaret were 
sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 10 Aug., 40 Eliz. 

9 August, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chauncerylane co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Wrighte late of London yoman alias 
Thomas Cope late of London yoman stole " duo cithara ligni vocat' 
Citharnes " worth thirty shillings, and " six dozen of yellowe wier " 
worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of George Evattes. 
Putting himself ' Guilty ' of petty larceny, and the jury appraising the 
chattels at eleven pence, Thomas Wrighte was delivered on payment 
of the fee. G. D. R., . . . . Oct., 40 Eliz. 

31 August, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, William Dugdale 
of the said parish yoman sold " beere and ale '' to divers of the 
Queen's lieges in measures not containing the lawful assize, and on 
the Lord's Day during time of prayer then and there commonly sold 
and uttered the same drinks. — Also, on the same file, a True Bill 
that Wilham Dugdale of the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields co. 
Midd., on 4 October 40 Elizabeth, assaulted John Burde one of the 
bailiffs of the liberty of Westminster, when executing his said office 
in the said parish, in God's and the Queen's peace, and took and 
rescued from the custody of the said John Burde one Thomas Scoles, 
taken and arrested by the same John. G. D. R., .... Oct., 
40 Eliz. 

I September, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hampton co. 
Midd. on the said day, Reginald Edgerton of the said parish assaulted 
and beat Thomazine Galloway, " et eandem Thomazinam adtunc et 
ibidem felonice rapere et carnaliter cognoscere voluisset." Putting 
himself ' Guilty,' he was fined five pounds and was required to find 
sureties for his good behaviour. G. D. R., . . . . Oct., 40 
Ehz. 

15 September, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, within the precinct 
of St. Katherine co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Mydhouse, 
Henry Gill, Ralph Cowper, Henry Benson and John Tyler, all 
late of London yomen, stole nine silver spoons worth three 
pounds, " vnam peciam auri cuniati vocat' one Elizabethe Royall ad 
valenciam x.f,." one other piece of coined gold called "an Edward 
half-crowne " worth two shillings and sixpence, and " vnam aliam 
peciam auri cuniati vocat' an Angell ad valenciam xj-.," of the goods, 
chattels and moneys of Thomas Collett roape-maker. Putting them- 
selves ' Guilty,' Thomas Mydhouse, Henry Gill, Ralph Cowper and 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 249 

Henry Benson were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . 
Oct., 40 Eliz. 

19 September, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bednollgrene co. 
Midd. on the said day, Richard Birde and Edmund Spencer, both 
late of London yomen, stole two white sheep worth eighteen pence, 
of the goods and chattels of a certain unknown man, in the said 
parish. Richard Birde and Edmund Spencer put themselves 
' Not Guilty,' and did not retract. G. D. R., . . . . Oct., 
40 Eliz. 

22 September, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Benjamin Johnson, 
late of London yoman, for killing Gabriel Spencer in the fields of 
Shorediche on the said day. For the particulars of this indictment, 
vide The Preface of the present volume. G. D. R., . . . 
Oct., 40 Eliz. 

28 October, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. 
in the night of the said day between ten and eleven o'clock, Robert 
Moseley, Edward Robson and Richard Johnson, all late of London 
yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Jerom Bassano 
gentleman, and stole therefrom a golde cheyne worth twenty-four 
pounds, a paire of bracelettes of golde worth twelve pounds, eight 
golde ringes worth forty pounds, " vnam peciam auri vocat' a Jewell 
of Golde ad valenciam vi li. xiiij-." ; and seventeen pounds in numbered 
money. Edward Robson was at large ; Robert Mosley po' se' non 
cul' nee rec'. G. D. R., 23 May, 41 Ehz. 

4 November, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Marlowe late of London yoman 
stole' " a heafer " of black colour worth four pounds, of the goods 
and chattels of Richard Edwardes. Putting himself ' Guilty,' William 
Marlowe asked for the book, and reading like a clerk was marked with 
the letter T, and delivered in accordance with the statute. 

9 November, 40 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chauncerylane co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Warberton late of London gentleman 
stole a woollen-cloth " cushinge " of divers colours worth ten pence, of 
the goods and chattels of John Bevington. Putting himself ' Guilty ' 
of petty larceny, John Warberton gentleman was dehvered on payment 
of the fee. 

17 November, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway of 
the parish of St. Clement-Danes without the Bars of the New 
Temple co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Bettesworthe, John Millward 
and Thomas Kyndesley, all late of London gentlemen, assaulted John 
Stanley, struck him down, robbed him of a watchett-coloured woollen- 
cloth cloak worth twenty shillings, a leather purse worth four pence, 
and thirty pounds being in the same purse, and then put the body of 



250 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the same John Stanley into a certain fountain full of water in the same 
highway, so that he was suffocated and drowned, and died instantly in 
the said water on the said 17th of November; And Further, that, 
knowing them to have perpetrated the said felony, Henry Roffe (?) 
late of London gentleman received aided and comforted the said 
Peter Bettesworthe, John Millward and Thomas Kyndesley on the 
i8th of Nov. 41 Eliz., at the aforesaid parish. Putting himself 
' Not Guilty,' Peter Bettesworth was acquitted ; John Millward and 
Thomas Kyndesley were at large ; Henry Roffe (?) was exonerated on 
account of Peter Bettesworth's acquittal. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 43' Ehz. 

20 November, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Thomas Knighton 
late of St. Clement's-Danes without the Bars of the New Temple 
gentleman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Com- 
mon Prayer from the said 20 Nov. 41 Eliz. to i Feb. then next follow- 
ing. With an endorsement that the bill was taken at G. S. P. on the 
19th of April 41 Eliz. ; and at the bill's foot the memorandum, " Pro- 
clamacio facta est juxta formam statuti." G. D. R., 20 Ap., 41 Eliz. 

1 December, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stanes co. Midd. 
on the said day, Katherine Rawdin late of the said parish spinster beat 
wounded and maimed Barbara Heme, a female infant aged ten 
months. G.' D. R., 23 May, 41 Eliz. 

2 December, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hampstead on the 
said day, James Lumbert, Thomas Cooper and Richard Ardington, all 
late of London yomen, stole two red cows worth six pounds, of the 
goods and chattels of William Ewer. Each of the three thieves 
confessed the indictment (cognovit indictament) : James Lumberte 
and Thomas Cooper were sentenced to be hung ; after asking for the 
book and reading like a clerk, Richard Ardington was marked with the 
letter T and delivered according to the form of the Statute (sign' cum 
Ira T et del juxta formam statuti). G. D. R., 20 Ap., 41 Eliz. 

12 December, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in a room of the 
dwelling-house of James Lovegrove at Braneford co. Midd. on the said 
day between one and two p.m., Agnes Charche late of London spinster 
gave birth to a male infant, living at the time of birth, and forthwith 
then and there with her hands, twisted and broke the neck of the said 
infant. Po' se' non cul' nee rec'. G. D. R., 18 Jan., 41 Eliz. 

21 December, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that John Allen, Robert 
Moseley, Thomas Hutchins and Anthony Jarrett, all late of London 
yomen, with malice aforethought, at Hackney co. Midd. on the said 
day, assaulted a certain William Holmes, and that John Allen with " a 
longestaffe" then and there gave the said William on his head a mortal 
wound, of which he died instantly, and that the aforesaid Robert, Tho- 
mas and Anthony were present at the said murder, inciting the said 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 251 

John to commit it. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' John Allen and 
Robert Moseley were sentenced to be hung ; Thomas Hutchins and 
Anthony Jarrett were at large. G. D. R., 23 May, 41 Eliz. 

24 December, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Edge late of London yoman stole " fyve yardes 
and a halfe of Denshire cloth color' blushe couUour " worth eighteen 
shillings, of the goods and chattels of Richard Gryffen. G. D. R., 
18 Jan., 41 Eliz. 

I January, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of Ales Johnes of Theames-street London, in the 
sum of one hundred pounds, " That she shall preferre or cause to be 
preferred one bill of Inditement againste one David Johnes of Abergey- 
nie in the county of Monmouth yeoman, for a supposed murther by 
him committed vppon one Thomas Johnes her brother some thirtye 
yeares past or thereaboutes in the Countie of Monmouthe aforesaide, 
at the nexte Sessions of Gaole Deliuerye to be helde in the county of 
Midds. aforsayde." G. D. R., 14 Feb., 41 Eliz. 

8 January, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, between six and seven 
o'clock in the night of the said day, Owin Vaughan late of London 
yoman, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Lady the 
now Queen at St. James's Parke in the parish of St. Martin-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd., the said Lady the Queen being at the time in the 
said house, and stole therefrom nine linen sheets worth four pounds, 
three linen tablecloths worth twenty shillings, a linen pillobeere worth 
twelve pence, and divers other pieces of linen cloth worth four shillings, 
of the goods and chattels of the Honourable Frances the Lady Burghe 
at St. James's Parke. G. D. R., 18 Jan., 41 Eliz. 

20 January, 41 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Eastsmithfeilde co. Midd., on view of the body of William 
Clement late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, 
on the 19th instant between eleven and twelve a.m., a certain John 
Aldersey was in his own house at Eastsmithfeilde aforesaid, in God's 
and the Queen's peace, when the aforesaid William Clement, armed 
with sword and dagger, broke in upon him and assailed him with those 
weapons ; and that in the affray thus forced upon him, John Aldersey, 
fighting in self-defence and for the preservation of his life, vnth his 
sword gave William Clement in the left side of his breast a mortal 
wound, of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 14 Feb., 
41 EHz. 

22 February, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of 
Stebunheathe co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Browne late of the 
said parish gentleman feloniously and traitorously dipt and diminished 
twenty pieces of the said Queen's true and lawful coin called sixe- 



252 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

pences, and twenty other pieces of money of the same Queen's true 
and lawful coin called shillinges. Taken at the Castle in St. Johnstreete 
CO. Midd. on 20th May, 41 Eliz. At the foot of the Bill, a memoran- 
dum that " afterwards, towit at a Session of Oyer and Terminer held 
at the Castell in Seint Johnstrete co. Midd. on 23 May, 41 Eliz., before 
Sir Robert Wrothe knt.. Sir Richard Marten knt., and Nicholas CoUyn, 
Henry Thuresby {sic) and Edward Vaughan esqs., Justices of the Peace 
&c: &c. Robert Browne put himself ' Not Guilty,' and did not retract." 
S. S. O. T., 20th and 23rd May, 41 Eliz. 

2 March, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Giles-in-the-Fields 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Richardson late of London yoman 
assaulted Anthony Dunne late of London yoman, and with a rapiour 
gave him in the left side of his breast a mortal wound of which he 
then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 20 April, 41 Eliz. 

8 March, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Vincent 
Skynner esq. J. P., of William Nutt baker and Thomas Cole alebruer, 
both of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of twenty 
pounds each, and of William Dugdale of the same parish alebruer, in 
the sum of forty pounds ; For the said William Dugdale's appearance at 
the next General Session of the Peace at Westminster, to answer to all 
things that may be then and there objected against him. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 41 Eliz. 

9 March, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Higheholborne co. 
Tilidd. on the said day Thomas Hungerford late of Barnard's-Inne in 
London gentleman assaulted Bartholomew Graye late of London 
gentleman, and with a rapiour gave the said Bartholomew on his right 
shoulder a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. 
On his arraignment Thomas Hungerforde put himself ' Not Guilty ' 
of manslaughter, but ' Guilty ' of killing in self-defence. G. D. R., 
23 May, 41 Eliz. 

10 March, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Blounte esq. J.P., of .... Roberte of Whitechappell marchante- 
vintner, and William Garrett of the same parish tayller, in the sum of 
ten pounds each, and of John Calleri of the same parish marchant- 
vintner, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John Calleri's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace at Westminster, 
then and there to answer &c., he "beinge charged by Ralfe Suertis of 
Whitchappell vintner to have commytted audolterie with Grace Suertis 
his wyfe." G. S. P. R., Easter, 41 Eliz. 

27 March, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that Hugh Powell and Tho- 
mas Deapes, both late of London yomen, in the night of the said day 
between eleven and twelve o'clock, at St. Martin's-in-the-Field co. 
Midd., broke burglariously into the house of Thomas Knighte clerk. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 253 

and stole therefrom a tablecloth worth five shillings, and a napkin worth 
twelve pence. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Deapes was sentenced 
to be hung : holding himself mute, Hugh Powell was committed to the 
peine forte et dure. Mut' se tenet Ideo cons p' Cur' qd' h'eat penam 
fort' et duram." G. D. R., 20 April, 41 Eliz. 

I April, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ruyslippe co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Smithe late of the said parish gentleman entered 
the church of the same parish, and there disturbed and molested 
Henry Studley elk., priest of the same parish, when he was about to 
administer and celebrate the divine sacrament, and moreover threw 
down and abused the blessed sacrament of the body of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. G. D. R., 20 April, 41 Eliz. 

12 April, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherine's co. 
Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, Mar- 
garet Sutton, wife of William Sutton of Radcliffe co. Midd., committed 
adultery with Thomas Kidwell late of London yoman. G. D. R,, 
. . . ., 41 Eliz. 

I May, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the night of the said 
day, Silvester Niccolles late of London yoman broke into the dwelling- 
house at Grayes Inne co. Midd. of William Milles esq., and stole 
therefrom a man's tawney-coloured gowne, laide downe with lace, worth 
eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of Richard Dallidowne gentle- 
man. Cognovit indictameritum, Sus. D..G. R., . . . .,41 Eliz. 

9 May, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Knightsbridge co. Midd. 
on the said day, William Fetherstone late of the said parish yoman and 
. . . . his wife, otherwise styled Elizabeth Fetherstone of the 
said parish spinster, " seipsos vocantes Egiptianos adtunc et ibidem per 
spacium trium dierum felonice fuerunt continuaverunt et remanserunt 
&c." At the bill's foot this clerical memorandum, " Indictamentum 
InsufFiciens p' Ci:r'." G. D. R., 23 May, 41 Eliz. 

15 May, 41 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Fincheleyco. Midd. on 
the said day, in a place of the said parish called Colefall, Freman Norton 
alias Avery late of Fincheley aforesaid tayler assaulted Robert Haynes, 
being in God's and the Queen's peace, and with a handbill murdered 
the said Robert by giving him on the left part of his head a wound, of 
which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 23 May, 41 Eliz. 

23 May, 41 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill, on the highway at Stepney co. 
Midd. on the said day, James Metcalfe late of London yoman assaulted 
Simon Smithe, and with a rapiour gave the same Simon on his left side 
a wound, of which he then and there died instantly. Putting himself 
'Guilty,' James Metcalfe was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 41 Eliz. 

28 May, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before John Grange 



254 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

esq. J. P., of Ezekiel Grosse of Lyons Inne co. Midd. gentleman, in the 
sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of Anne Vaughan, wife 
of ... . Vaughan of St. Clement's-Danes co. Midd., at the 
next Session of the Peace, to answer to all things that shall then and 
there be objected against her, " suspected to be a lewde and incon- 
tinent woman." — Also, on the same file, the recognizances, taken on 
the same day before the same magistrate, of Ezekiel Grosse of Lyons 
Inne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Richard 
Dagge of St. Kene co. Cornwall, gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said Richard Dagge's appearance at the next Session 
of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. " for incontinence with one 
Anne Vaughan." G. D. R., . . . . 41 Eliz. 

— June, 41 Elizabeth. — Forty several True Bills, for not going to 
church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, against the fol- 
lowing forty-two persons, — (i) William Smyth of Shordich yoman, (2) 
Thomas Vachell late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, (3) Katherine 
Smyth of Shorediche spinster, (4) Thomas Burre of Shordich yeoman, 
(5) Elizabeth Abbs wife of Thomas Abbs of Shorediche, (6) Thomas 
Abbs late of Shordich, (7 ) Winifred WiUiams late of Whitechapell, (8) 
Thomas Gawen late of Westminster gentleman, (9) Edmund Tayler 
late of Edmonton gentleman, (10) Nicholas Crudde late of Golding- 
lane in St Giles's without Creplegate yoman, (11) Margaret Webbe late 
of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, (13) John Standen late of St. Dunstan's- 
in-the-West gentleman, (14) Arden Waferer late of St. Clement's Danes, 
(15) ... . Rosecarrett of St. Clement's Danes esq., (16) Nich- 
olas Bosgrave of St. Clement's-Danes gentleman, (17) Lucie Smyth of 
St. Clement's Danes spinster, (18) . . . . Lady Mounteagle late 
of Hoggesdonco. Midd., (19) Launcelett Porter late of St. Margaret's 
Westminster gentleman, (20) Jane Shelley of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 
widow, (21) Thomas Churchyarde of St. Margaret's Westminster 
gentleman, (22) Isabel Fortescue of St. Botolph's-without-Bishopsgate, 

(23) Elizabeth Lady Huddleston of St. Botolph's-without-Bishopsgate, 

(24) John Reason of St. Margaret's Westminster yoman, (25) William 
Page of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, (26) Isaack Allen of 
St. Margaret's Westminster yoman, (27) Henry Carye of St. Margaret's 
Westminster gentleman, (28) William Brasheforde late of St. Margaret's 
Westminster yoman, (29) Robert Lunne late of St. Margaret's West- 
minster yoman, (30) Patrick Seagrave late of St. Margaret's Westmin- 
ster yoman, (31) Richard Carrowe late of St. Andrew's Holborne 
gentleman, (32) Andrra (sic) Gifforde wife of William Gifforde, late of 
Northall co. Midd. gentleman, (33) William Goodaker late of St. 
Andrew's Holborne barber and (34) his wife Anne " nuper de eadem 
spinster," (35) Alice Nashe late of St. Johnstreete in St. Sepulchre's 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS ROLLS. 255 

widow, (36) Agnes Cole late of Heston co. Midd. spinster, (37) Thomas 
Pallmere, .... gentleman, (38) Margaret Webbe . . . ., 
(39) Alice Plunkett .... widow, (40) William Woodfall . . . ., 
(41) George Dethicke . . . ., and (42) .... spinster. — Four 
of these persons are indicted by two bills, but each of the other thirty- 
eight bills is a bill against a single individual. At the foot of each 
bill appears the clerical memorandum "Proclamatio facta est juxta 
formam statuti &c." All the offenders are indicted for not going to 
any usual place of Common Prayer for six months ; but whilst some of 
the offenders are charged with avoiding church &c. from the loth of 
June 41 Eliz. others are indicted for neglecting common worship from 
the last day of that month. That these bills were part of a Goal 
Delivery Roll appears from a remaining fragment of their original 
wrapper ; and the roll must have been a roll of the Queen's 42nd year. 
But they are placed with the rolls of the earUer year, and must be 

sought for in G. D. R ,41 Eliz. 

9 June, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster on the 
said day, Robert Sekes late of London yoman stole a silver "bole" 
worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble the 
Lord Mountacute. — Po se cul ca null petit librum legit vt clericus sign' 
cum Ira T Et del' juxta formam statuti Et postea rep', p' Cur. pro b. g. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 41 Eliz. 

28 June, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Norton-foUgate co. 
Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Crowe late of London spinster stole a 
piece of silver called " a silver toothpicker " worth three pence, 
another piece of silver called " a silver earepicker " worth three pence, 
a parcel-gilt silver ring worth twelve pence, and five shillings of 
numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of William 
Denbye. Putting herself ' Guilty ' of petty larceny, the chattels 
being appraised by the Jury at eleven-pence and a half-penny, Eliza- 
beth Crowe was discharged on payment of the fee. G. D. R., . . . ., 
41 Eliz. 

22 July, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J. P., of Robert Rove and John Crane, both of Graies 
Inne gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Elizabeth 
Welshe of Graies-Inne-lane widow, in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the said Elizabeth's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, then 
and there to answer &c., she being " charged to have stolen Fitz- 
herbert's Abbridgment at large out of the library in Graies Inne." 

G. D. R , 41 Eliz. 

28 July, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J.P., of Joseph Lyngley of Forsterlane London goldsmith, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Joseph's appearance at 



256 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

the next Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his good 
behaviour, because " he was taken by Mr. Nicholson in a lewde house." 
G. D. R., . . . ., 41 Eliz. 

6 October, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of Gilbert Trobrige of the Middle Temple in 
London gentleman and .... of the parish of St. Clement 
Danes co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and 
of Joan Blood in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said Joan Blood's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace at Westminster, 
and in the mean time for her peaceful bearing towards all people, and 
more especially towards Joan Owen of High Holborne spinster. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

6 October, 41 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of Gilbert Trobridge of the Middle Temple in London 
gentleman and William Perkins of the parish of Clement-Danes co. 
Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Barnard 
Lupton of High Holborne gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds ; 
For the appearance of the said Barnard Lupton and his wife at the 
next General Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for their 
peaceful bearing towards all people, and more especially towards Joan 
Owen of High Holborne spinster. G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

24 October, 41 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Goldinge Lane in 
the parish of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate co. Midd., Richard More 
late of London gentleman and Nicholas Garland .... assaulted 
Henry Heard, and that with a dagger the said Richard More slew the 
same Henry Heard by giving him on the right side of his head a 
mortal blow, of which he died on the 3rd of November then next 
following. G. D. R , 43 Eliz. 

30 November, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Pancras on the said day, George Hemsworthe late of ... . 
assaulted Henry Burnarde . . . ., and with a rapiour gave the 
same Henry in his left side a mortal wound, of which he died on the 
said day. G. D. R., 14 Feb., 42 Eliz. 

I December, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in- 
the-Fields on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
Christofer Chyme late of London yoman and Magdalen Gibson (the 
wife of Richard Gibson of the aforesaid parish yoman) have committed 
adultery. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 42 Eliz. 

6 December, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Grayes Tnne Lane 
CO. Midd. between eleven and twelve in the night of the said day, 
John Mathewe and Tobias Mathewe, both late of London gentlemen, 
broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Elie Dewell widow and 
stole therefrom six yards of satten " coloris Lyon Haie " worth three 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 257 

pounds, a red woollen-cloth petticoat worth twenty shillings, and a 
silk purse worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of the said 
Elie Dewell. G. D. R., 14 Feb., 42 Eliz. 

8 December, 42 Elizabeth.— True bill that, at My lend in the 
parish of Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Jacob late of 
London yoman assaulted Mary Corey, an infant of the age of three 
years, " et ipsam Mariam Corey tunc et ibidem rapuit defloravit et 
.... carnaliter cognovit." G. D. R., 17 Jan., 42 Eliz. 

23 December, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J.R, of Henry Asheley of Westminster esq., and William 
Sommelton of Porton co. Wiltes. gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of John Browne of Westminster yoman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the said John Browne's appearance at the next General 
Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing 
towards all people, and especially towards Mathew Royden of West- 
minster clerk. G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

23 December, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of William Sommelton of Porton co. Wiltes. gentle- 
man and Venus Hudson late of . . . ., in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of Henry Asheley (one of Her Majesty's Gentlemen Pentioners- 
in-ordinary) esq., in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Henry 
Asheley's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for 
Middlesex, and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all 
people, and especially towards Mathew Royden of Westminster clerk. 
G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. » 

23 December, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of Henry Asheley (one of Her Majesty's gentlemen 
pentioners) gentleman, and WilUam Sommelton of Porton co. Wiltes. 
gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Thomas Asheley 
of Westminster gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said 
Thomas Asheley's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, 
and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing towards all people and 
especially towards Mathew Royden of Westminster clerk. G. S. P. R., 
Easter, 42 Eliz. 

2 January, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J. P., of Thomas Foxall grocer and William Foxall grocer, 
both of the parish of St. Benedict Gracechurche, London, in the sum 
of twenty pounds each ; For the appearance of William Ridge of 
Clareley co. Salop yeoman at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, 
he being under " suspicion of a frenche silver cuppe stolne at the 
Whyte Lyon Tavernein Highe Holborne.^' G. D. R., 14 Feb., 42 Eliz. 

28 January, 42 Elizabeth. — ^True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. 
Midd. on the night of the said day, George Collins yoman, Richard 

s 



2S8 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Cholmeley gentleman and William Greene gentleman, all three late of 
the aforesaid parish, broke into the dwelling-house of Thomas Bedinge- 
fielde esq., and stole therefrom an iron chest worth ten shillings and a 
hundred pounds of money in the same chest. Putting themselves ' Not 
Guilty,' the three prisoners were remanded. G. D. R. , 42 Eliz. 

3 February, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Strond in the 
parish of St. Clement Danes without the Bars of the New Temple 
and in the highway there, on the said day, James Bell late of London 
yoman assaulted William Richards, then being in God's and the 
Queen's peace, and drawing his dagger threw it at him, so that the 
weapon gave the said William Richards on the right knee a mortal 
wound, of which he died on the i6th of March then next following. 
Putting himself ' Guilty,' he asked for the book, could not read and 

was remanded by the Court before judgment. G. D. R. , 

42 Eliz. 

25 February, 42 Elizabeth. — True bill that, at Norton-folgate 
CO, Midd. on the said day, John Gervis late of the said parish yoman 
and his wife Margaret Gervis assaulted and beat Edward Nicollson, 
Provismarshall of the said county, when he was in the execution of 
his office. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Ehz. 

28 February, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington co. 
Midd. on the said day, Catherine Cadmore late of London spinster 
stole a hattbande of pearle worth thirty shillings, a purse of cloth of 
silver worth ten shillings, a satten pynpillowe imbrodered with golde 
worth six shillings, a pair of keye-hangers of silke sett with pearle 
worth thirteen shillings and four pence, a black safegard .... 
worth three shillings and four pence, a silver whiste {sic, ? whistle) 
worth eight pence, a silver " harte '' worth eighteen pence, a silk'e-girdle 
worth two shillings, " vnam peciam auri vocat' a quarter-angel " worth 
two shillings and sixpence, " vnam aliam peciam auri vocat' a 
Soveraigne ad valenciam xf.,'' and "vnam aliam peciam auri vocat' a 
Supurryall ad valenciam xj'.," and twenty-nine shillings in numbered 
money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of Christofer Woodhouse 
gentleman. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

5 March, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Maribone co. Midd. 
on the said day, William Gooderidge late of London yoman assaulted 
John Hylton on the highway, and robbed him of a grey horse worth 
thirty pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Alice the 
Countess-Dowager of Derby, when the said horse was in the custody 
of the same John Hylton gentleman. — Also, on the same file, a True 
Bill against the same highwayman, William Gooderidge, for assaulting 
James Hylton gentleman on the highway at Maribone co. Midd., on 
the same 5 March 42 Eliz. and robbing him of a goyld ringe worth 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 259 

ten shillings, a dagger worth ten shillings and forty-five shillings in 
numbered money. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Ehz. 

II March, 42 Elizabeth.— Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyns esq. J. P., of Richard Fletcher of the city of Norwitch pewterer, 
in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Richard's appearance at the 
next General Session of the Peace, to give evidence against William 
Haukins, " chardged with a purse taken at a play at the Curten with 
xxvis. v\d. in it" G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

16 March, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. 
on the said day, Henry Sydall late of London yoman stole a balde- 
faced baye ambluige geldinge worth eight pounds, and a baye trottinge 
Geldinge worth nine pounds, of the goods and chattels of George 
Awsten gentleman. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

19 March, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyns esq. J. P., of William Acland yeoman and William Grene 
baker, both of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate, in the sum of twenty pounds 
each, and of William Haukins of the same parish barber, in the sum 
of forty pounds ; For the said William Haukins's appearance at the 
next Session of the Peace, he being " charged with a purse taken at 
the Curten." G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

25 March, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Edward 
Vaghan esq. J. P., of Francis Beridge of Oriel College, Oxford, gentle- 
man, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Francis Beridge's appear- 
ance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

25 March, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Edward 
Vaghan esq. J. P., of Hugh Holland M.A. of Trinitie College, Cam- 
bridge, in the sum of two hundred pounds ; For his appearance at 
the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

25 March, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Edward 
Vaghan esq. J. P., of Lewis Tresham of London gentleman, in the 
sum of one hundred pounds ; For the said Lewis Tresham's appear- 
ance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, then and there to 
answer &c. G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

26 March, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill against Robert Cattesbye, 
late of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. esq., for not going to church, 
chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer during the six months 
next following the said 26 March 42 Eliz. — Similar True Bill 
against Robert Hare late of St. Leonard's in Shorediche gentleman, 
for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer during the afore- 
said term. — Similar True Bill against Katherine Rooper late of St. 
Andrew's in Holborne spinster alias Katherine Rooper wife of William 
Rooper of the said parish esq., for not going to any usual place of 
Common Prayer during the same term.— Similar True Bill against 

s 2 



260 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

William Perrye, late of St. Andrew's in Holborne gentleman, for not 
going to any usual place of Common Prayer during the same term. — 
True Bill against Henry Harte late of Clarkenwell gentleman, for not 
going to any usual place of Common Prayer, during the two months 
next following the first of a month (no longer discoverable from the 
blackened parchment) of 42 Eliz. — Similar True Bill against John 
Gardyner of Islington gentleman, for not going to any usual place of 
Common Prayer, during the three months next following the loth of 
April, 42 Eliz. — Similar True Bill against Anne Williamson of Islington 
spinster alias Anne Williamson wife of ... . Williamson of the 
said parish gentleman, for not going to any usual place of Common 
Prayer during the three months next following 10 April 42 Eliz.— 
These seven Bills (on each of which appears the official memorandum 
of proclamation) have passed at some time or other from broken files 
to G. D. R., 17 Jan., 42 Eliz. 

1 April, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Sir John 
Peyton knt.. Lieutenant of the Tower of London, and Thomas 
Fowler, Tobias Woode, Edward Vaghan and Henry Thoresby esqs.. 
Justices of the Peace, of John Wolf of Eastsmithfeild co. Midd. 
stationer, in the sum of forty pounds ; The condition of the recognizance 
being " that, whereas the abovebouriden John Wolf hathe begun to 
erecte and builde a Playhowse in Nightingale Lane near East Smithe- 
feilde aforesaid contrary to Her Majesties proclamacion and orders sett 
downe in Her Highenes Court of Starrchamber. If therefore the said 
John Wolf do not proceede anie further in buildinge or erectinge of 
the same playhowse, unless he shall procure sufficient warrant from 
the Rt. Honourable the Lords of Her Majesties most honourable 
Privye Councill for further .... then this recognizaunce to be 
void or els to remaine in full force." G. S. P. R., Easter, 42 Eliz. 

2 April, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherine's co. 
Midd. on the said day, Richard Nelson late of London yoman prac- 
tised and exercised certain detestable and devilish arts, called " witch- 
craftes inchauntementes charmes and sorcerie " upon and against 
Katherine Corwell, an infant aged eleven weeks, by reason of which 
detestable practice the said infant has languished from the said 2nd of 
April 42 Eliz. until the day of the taking of this inquisition, to wit the 
4th of April 42 Eliz., " et adhuc valde infirma et languida existit." 
G. D. R., 4 April, 42 Eliz. 

18 April, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Thomas gentleman, William Poore 
gentleman and Francis Hull clerk, all late of London, assaulted Richard 
Thomas gentleman, and that then and there John Thomas with a 
sword gave the said Richard on the left side of his breast a mortal 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 261 

wound, of which he then and there died instantly. Putting themselves 
' Guilty,' John Thomas and William Poore were sentenced to be hung ; 
Francis Hull "po' se non cul' nee rec'." G. D. R., . . . ., 42 EHz. 

24 April, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the water of the 
river Thames at Hampton co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Chippes, 
the guider or steersman of a certain barge drawn by three horses, wil- 
fully and feloniously handled the same barge, so as to upset a boat in 
which Richard Nightingale esq. and his wife Frances Nightingale and 
their servant Mary Wager were then and there being rowed by Thomas 
Jones and John Savage, whereby the said Richard Chippes caused the 
same Richard, Frances and Mary to be submerged. G. D. R., . . . ., 

42 Eliz. 

25 April, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Fynche- 
ley CO. Midd. on the said day, Peter Gore late of London gentleman 
assaulted Tfiomas Hall, and robbed him of thirteen pounds in num- 
bered moneys. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Thomas Hall was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

4 May, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fyncheley co. Midd. on 
the said day, Joan Austen of the said parish made half-a-hundred 
weight of starche" de tritico,'' against the form of the Proclamation in 
this case published. — Also six other several True Bills against six 
different persons for the same offence, viz. against Mary Coyle of 
Brayneforde co. Midd. for making twoe hundred-weight of starch at 
Brayneford on 24 August 42 Eliz. ; Daniel Arthur of Kensington co. 
Midd. cowper for making two hundred-weight of starch on 4 Sept. 

43 Eliz. ; Richard Norton of Clerkenwell co. Midd. for making at 
Clerk enwell half-a-hundred weight of starch on 28 May, 43 Eliz. ,: 
Richard Savadge jun'. of Popler yoman, for making half-a-hundred- 
weight of starch at Popler on i August 43 Eliz. ; John Skynner of 
Clarkenwell for making a hundred-weight of starch at Clarkenwell on 
28 Sept. 43 Eliz. ; and Thomas Humfrye of St. Katheren's co. Midd. for 
making at St. Katheren's twoe hundred-weight of starch on 26 August, 
42 Eliz. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 

4 June, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. on 
the said day, Henry Bowyer late of London yoman stole a baye nagg 
worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Crowther. — 
Also, nine other indictments of the same Henry Bowyer, for stealing 
horses in and about London from different owners on days of June, 
August and October 42 Eliz., and November 42 and 43 Eliz., viz. at 
Stepney, Hackeney, Beddnollgreene, and Stratfordebowe. At the head 
of each bill, the memorandum "Cogn' Indictamentu' Sus'." He con- 
fessed the indictment, and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
16 Feb., 43 Eliz. 



262 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

24 June, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J.P., of William Haner of Norton Folgate co. Midd. yeoman, 
and Richard Drury and Francis Jeffery, both' of Eastsmythfield bruers, 
in the sura of twenty pounds each ; For the appearance of the said 
Richard and Francis at the next Session of the Peace in Middlesex, to 
answer for " misusing a woman great with child and throwing her down- 
stairs." G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

24 June, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Nortonfolgate co. 
Midd. on the said day, Richard Drury of Eastsmithfeilde brewer 
assaulted Bridget Strynger, wife of John Strynger, knocking her down 
and throwing her into a cellar. Putting himself Guilty,' Richard Drury 
was fined twenty shillings, and required to give security for his good 
behaviour. G. D. R., . . . .,42 Eliz. 

I July, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Turmillstreete co. Midd. 
and elsewhere in the said county for six months next following the 
said day, John Archer of the said street exercised the art and mystery 
of a blacksmith, without having served an apprenticeship of seven 
years to the same art and mystery, against the form of a certain statute 
of s Ehz. G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

1 July, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizances,- taken before John Grange 
esq. J. P., of John Darcye of Newington Buttes co. Surrey gentleman 
and Henry Atkinson of Fleete Lane in London tayler, in the sum of 
twenty pounds each ; For the appearance of Elizabeth Hawle, wife of 
Arthur Hawle of Newington aforesaid gentleman, at the next Gaol 
Delivery of Newgate, to answer &c. " for suspicion of fower yardes of 
broade cloth shee bought of one Duglas and two other men at the 

Signe of the Black Swanne in Westminster." G. D. R., 

42 Eliz. 

2 July, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Andrew's Holborne 
in the night of the said day between ten and eleven p.m., Elizabeth 
Gallant late of the said parish spinster assaulted a male infant, born 
alive of her body, and murdered the same infant by crushing in its 
head with her hands. G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

II July, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J.P., of John Cannon of Yateley co. Southampton gentle- 
man, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace, he having been " taken sus- 
piciously in the fieldes with a lewde woman." G. D. R., . . . ., 
42 Eliz. 

II July, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J. P., of Henry Hunninges, servant of Robert Maule of 
Kingsey co. Buckingham gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; 
For the appearance of the same Henry Hunninges, and Joan Cooke 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 263 

and Helen Bowyfelde of Bisshopsgate Street in London, at the next 
Session of the Peace, they being ' persons of lewde lieffe and con- 
versacon." G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

11 July, 42 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J. P., of John Porday of St. Katherin's near the Tower of 
London, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of the said 
John Porday and his wife Joan at the next Session of the Peace, they 
being « persons suspected of lewde lieffe." G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

12 July, 42 Elizabeth.— Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Candeler esq. J.P., of Thomas Pate of Tottenham co. Midd. gentleman 
and Thomas Franklyn of the parish of St. Peter Avincula {sic) in the 
Tower of London cutler, in the sum of five pounds each, and of John 
Francke of London gentleman ('•' ymployed in Her Majestes service 
for Ireland, beinge I>evetenaunt to Captayne William Newre")in the sum 
of ten pounds ; For the said John Francke's appearance at the next Ses- 
sion of the Peace, to answer for a breach of the peace charged against 
him by the Cunstable of Goldinge Lane. G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

20 July, 42 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Chauncerylane co. 
Midd. on the said day and during the next two months preceding this 
inquisition, William Strange of the said lane unlawfully received and 
and kept in his dwelling-house " quosdam subtenentes anglice Inmates," 
against the laws and ordinances of the kingdom of England. G. D. R., 
I Dec, 43 EHz. 

29 July, 42 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, in the Kinges Feild at 
Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, William Sharpe late of L<|idon 
yoman assaulted William Sammes (he being in God's and the 
Queen's peace)^ and with a staff called " a padlestaffe " gave the said 
William Sammes on the right part of his head a mortal blow, of 
which he died on the 7 th of August then next following. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 42 Eliz. 

I August, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in their house at St. 
Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day and at divers times before and 
afterwards, Edward Weldon gentleman and his wife Anne for gain and 
profit received and harboured persons of bad fame and life, to wit, 
" communes meretrices ociosas et suspectuosas personas ociose et 
suspectuose viventes." G. D. R., . . . ., 42 Eliz. 

31 August, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at his house in Chaun- 
cerylane CO. Midd. on the said day, and during the month next pre- 
ceding the present inquisition, John Smythe of the said lane received 
and maintained " quendam subtenentem anglice an Inmate," against the 
laws and ordinances of this kingdom of England. G. D. R., i Dec, 
43 Eliz. 

31 August, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 



264 

Stanwell co. Midd. on the said day, Edmund Shordiche late of 
Iver CO. Bucks, gentleman assaulted William HoUyday, and robbed 
him of a piece of undressed white cloth worth thirteen pounds. Po 
se non cul nee r'. G. D. R., i Dec, 43 Eliz. 

I September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Sonbury co. 
Midd. on the said day and during the six months then next following, 
Arnold Turner late of the same parish exercised the art and occupa- 
tion of a blacksmith, without having served an apprehticeship of seven 
years to the same art and occupation, against the form of the statute 
of 5 Eliz., in that case provided. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz. 

8 September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johnstreete 
in the night of the said day between ten and eleven p.m., Francis 
Pigott, George Trowte alias Gory, and John Fitzwilliams, all late of 
London gentlenien, broke burglariously into the house of William 
Fitzwylliams esq., with the intention of despoiling him of his goods 
and chattels and murdering him. Putting themselves ' Guilty,' the 
three burglars were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 
42 Eliz. 

20 September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Chauncerylane 
CO. Midd. on the said day, John Middleton of the same lane yoman 
refused to keep watches there. G. D. R., 1 Dec, 43 Eliz. 

20 September, ,42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Stephen's 
Alley in Westminster co. Midd., Henry Edlyn of the said alley yoman 
refused to keep watches at the same alley. G. D. R., i Dec. 43 Eliz., 

20 September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Tottenham co. 
Midd. on the said day, the Most Noble the Earl of Oxford with divers 
of his servants blocked up an ancient footway, lying near Stamford 
Hill, and leading from Tottenham aforesaid to the parish church of 
Hackney, by which footway divers of the Queen's lieges have from 
time immemorial been accustomed to journey towards the said 
church and to the city of London. G. D. R., i Dec, 43 Eliz. 

27 September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bednall Grene 
in the parish of Stebunhith co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Sharpe 
late of London yoman stole half-a-yard of tawny-coloured veluet 
trimmed with crimson silk, worth five shillings, and half-a-yard of 
" Tuftaffita coloris watched and crimson " trimmed with orenge-and- 
blewe coloured silk, worth four shillings. Confessing the indictment, 
Peter Sharpe asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the 
letter T, and delivered in accordance with the statute. G. D. R., 
., 42 Eliz. 

30 September, 42 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hoglane in the 
parish of Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Anthony Warren of St. 
Botolph's-without-Allgate in London yoman built and erected three 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 265 

cottages " called three base cottages," against the form of the statute in 
that case provided. G. D. R., i Dec, 43 Eliz. 

19 October, 42 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Newe Inne co. 
Midd., in the night of the said day between two and three a.m., Peter 
Homes a//<w Hopperly, late of London yoman, broke burglariously into 
the dwelling-house of George Lawley gentleman and John Vavysor 
gentleman, and stole therefrom " octodecem pecias electri vocat' pewter 
pottengers (sic)" worth nine shillings, and "octodecem alias pecias 
electri vocat' meate dysshes ad valenciam xi5.," of the goods and chattels 
of the said George Lawley and John Vavysor.— Putting himself ' Guilty ' 
of the felony, but not of the burglary, Peter was sentenced to be 
hung. G. D. R., i Dec, 43 Eliz. 

I November, 42 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Hadley co. Midd. 
on the said day, Robert Stambridge of the said place yoman divided 
and converted one cottage into four several tenements, which tene- 
ments are unfit for habitation " quia carent culminibus anglice vocat' 
chymies," to the great alarm of the inhabitants there, and against the 
peace of the Lady the Queen. G. D. R., i Dec, 43 Eliz. 

21 November, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Jones late of London 
yoman assaulted Edmund Tinsley, and then and there slew and 
murdered him, by giving him on his right showlder with a sword a 
mortal wound, of which the said Edmund then and there died instantly. 
G. D. R., I Dec, 43 Eliz. 

4 December, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Chief 
Justice Popham, of Nicholas Startoppe of St. Buttolph's-without-Algate 
yoman and Thomas Wyttye of St. Katherin's near the Tower of London 
brewer, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Thornas Woodde of 
St. Buttolph's aforesaid clothworker, in the sum of one hundred 
marks ; For the said Thomas Woodde's appearance at the next Gaol 
Delivery. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz. 

6 December, 43 Elizabeth. — Five several True Bills against the 
following five persons — viz. (i) Margery Blasson late of Hampton in 
parish of Hampton co. Midd. spinster, alias Margery Blasson wife of 
John Blasson of the said parish, (2) Juliana Butcher late of St 
Andrew's in Holborne spinster, (3) William Goodakers late of St. 
Andrew's in Holborne yoman, (4) Anne Goodakers jun'. late of St. 
Andrewes in Holborne spinster, (5) Francis Northe late of St. 
Andrewes in Holborne gentleman — for not going to church, chapel or 
any usual place of Common Prayer, during the three months next 
following the aforesaid 6th of December. 

31 December, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Katherin's 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Alice Lee late of London spinster stole a 



266 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

pair of linen sheetes worth four shillings, eleven flaxen .napkins worth 
two shillings, a Cambrick band worth sixpence, a silke apron worth 
twelve pence, a black silke kirtle worth three shillings, two brass 
candlestickes worth three shillings and four pence, " vnum librum 
vocatum a service booke '' worth eighteen pence, and six shillings and 
sixpence in numbered money, of the goods, chattels and moneys of 
Mabelle Harrys. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Alice Lee pleaded preg- 
nancy. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz. 

4 January, 43 Elizabeth. —True Bill that, at Hendon co. Midd. 
on the said day, Joan Nicolls late of London spinster stole a bushel 
and half a bushel of wheat worth six (si'i:) shillings, and a bushel and 
three pecks of oats worth six (sic) shillings, of the goods and chattels of 
Humfrey George. Putting herself ' Guilty,' of petty larceny, Joan Nicolls 
was liberated. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 43 Eliz. 

8 January, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Norton FoUgate co. 
Midd. in the night of the same day, Elizabeth Cooper late of London 
spinster broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of William Radley, 
and stole therefrom two linen pillowebeeres worth eighteen pence, a 
linen smocke worth twelve pence, " unum fronticulum panni linei 
vocatum a Crossecloth ad valenciam vi^.," a child's bedd worth twelve 
pence, and a woollen kertle worth two shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of the same William Radley. Putting herself ' Guilty,' Eliza- 
beth Cooper was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 
43 Eliz. 

9 January, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Leonard's in 
Shordiche co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Arnold and Peter 
Sharpe, both late of London yomen, stole two woollen-cloth cubbord- 
clothes worth five shillings, a woollen carpett worth four shillings, a 
silver forke worth four shillings, six pieces of corrall worth two shil- 
lings, four spoons of mother-of-pearle worth three shillings, six knyves 
worth two shillings, a box covered with redd velvett worth three 
shillings and four-pence, a Jewell of golde and pearle worth two shillings, 
" vnam peciam Argenti vocatam a Cattamountayne of silver ad valen- 
ciam xKs.," of the goods and chattels of Thomas Marten, Doctor of 
Sacred Theology. Confessing the indictment, Henry Arnold asked 
for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and de- 
livered according to the form of the Statute. Peter Sharpe put himself 
' Guilty,' and, there appearing evidence that he had committed bur- 
glary in another county, was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 
43 Eliz. 

20 January, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Hamersmithe in 
the parish of Fullham co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Morgan late of 
London spinster, and Anne Simpson also late of London spinster were 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 267 

seen and found in the company of society of vagabonds commonly 
called Egyptians, and call themselves "Egyptians, and thus have 
done feloniously for the space of one month after the said day at 
Hamersmithe aforesaid, and elsewhere in the same county. Joan 
Morgan put herself 'Guilty' and pleaded her pregnancy; but on 
being found ' Not Pregnant ' by a jury of matrons, she was sentenced 
to be hung. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Anne Simpson pleaded her 
pregnancy and was reprieved, it being found by a jury of matrons that 
she was pregnant. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 43 Eliz. 

22 January, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway of 
Mylend in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Henry 
Peckham late of London yoman assaulted Nicholas Lee, and with a 
staffe murdered him, by giving him on the hinder part of his head 
with the same weapon a mortal blow, of which he then and there died 
instantly ; and that Thomas Freeman, late of Mylend aforesaid yoman, 
knowing him to have perpetrated the said murder, received aided and 
comforted the same Henry at Mylend on the same day. Thomas 
Freeman put himself ' Not Guilty ' and did not retract. Putting him- 
self ' Guilty,' Henry Peckham was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
24 April, 43 Eliz. 

28 February, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Sir 
Robert Wrothe knt. J. P., of Marke Antony of Whitechappell stranger, 
and Thomas Shepperd of the parish of Crechurch within Allgate 
draper, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Woode of 
East Smythfeild scrivener, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the said 
Thomas Woode's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, " to aunswer 
for the forgeinge or counterfeitinge of writinges." G. D. R., 3 April, 
43 Eliz. 

28 February, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Edward 
Stanhope LL.D., one of the Masters of Chancery and J.P. for co. 
Midd., of Henry Marshe of St. Gregory's in the city of London 
leatherseller and Robert Bucke of the Mynores in London gunmaker, 
and Thomas Samon alias Smith of the parish of Whitchappell, in the 
sum of one hundred pounds each, and John Cadwallader of White- 
chappell gentleman in the sum of two hundred pounds ; For the 
said John Cadwallader's appearance at the next General Session 
of the Peace, and afterwards for his appearance at such Sessions as 
shall be appointed, from time to time during an entire year, and 
for his good behaviour during the same time, and for his continuance 
during the same term within the jurisdiction of the Court unless 
he shall have licence to depart therefrom. G. D. R., 3 April, 
43 Eliz. 

3 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Margaret's parish 



268 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

in Westminster on the said day, Teague Warde late of London 
gentleman assaulted Arthur Prickett, when he was in God's and the 
Queen's peace, and with a sword called " an arminge sworde " slew 
the same Arthur, by giving him under the right side of his breast 
a mortal wound, of which he died on the 8th day of the same month. 
On the back of the bill, a memorandum that it was taken at the Castle 
in St. John's Street on 3 April 43 Eliz. before seven Justices, by the 
oath of twenty jurors, whose names, like the names of the Justices, are 
given in the endorsement. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Teague Warde 
asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, 
and delivered according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R., 3 April, 
43 Eliz. 

16 March, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J.P., of John Davies of St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. 
taylour, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Price of Plaestow co. 
Essex yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said John Price's 
appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, he having been 
"taken in a suspitious house and haveing noe busines in towne." 
G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz. 

16 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johnstrete co. 
Midd. on the said day, James Dowdall late of London yoman stole a 
piece of linen cloth called lawne worth twenty-one shillings, and 
another piece of lawne worth twenty-five shillings, and another piece of 
lawne worth thirty-two shillings, and another piece of lawne worth fifty- 
five shillings, and another piece of lawne worth three pounds four 
shillings, and another piece of lawne worth thirty-nine shillings, and 
eight elles of white holland worth thirty-two shillings, and fifteen elles 
of greene .... holland worth thirty shillings, and fifteen elles of 
. . . . holland worth . . . ., and eleven elles of browne hol- 
land worth twenty-six shillings, and a piece of . . . . holland 
worth forty-two shillings, and a piece of white holland worth . . . ., 
of the goods and chattels of Gilbert (?) Walden. Memorandum at the 
head of the bill, " Cogn Ind petit libru' legit vt Cl'icus rep', ante 
cremat' Confessing the indictment, he asks for the book, reads like 
a clerk, is reprieved before being branded." G. D. R., 3 April, 
43 Eliz. 

20 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johnstreete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Robert Procter late of London stole a redd 
woollen pettycoate worth ten pence, of the goods and chattels of Hugh 
Fludde ; and that, on the 23rd of the same month, Richard Robenson 
yoman and Joan Robenson spinster, both of the same street, knowing 
him to have perpetrated the said felony, received aided and comforted 
the said Robert Procter. Robert Procter and Joan Robenson confessed 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 269 

the indictment ; Richard Robenson was at large. G. D. R., 3 April, 

43 Eliz- 

20 March, 43 Elizabeth.— True Bill that (whereas Thomas Tyche- 
burne late of London clerk, born within this kingdom of England, 
who, after the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist i Eliz., 
and before the 20"' June 21 Eliz. was made and ordained a priest 
by authority, derived and pretended from the See of Rome) George 
Baylie late of St. James's in Clarkenwell co. Midd. glover and his 
wife Mary Baylie alias Mary Baylie spinster, knowing the said Tho- 
mas to be such a priest as is aforesaid, at large and out of prison, 
willingly received, comforted, aided and maintained him at St. James's 
aforesaid, on the 20th March, 43 Eliz. At the foot of the bill, a 
memorandum that the aforesaid George and Mary Baylie were exone- 
rated in this matter by the Queen's pardon. G. D. R., . . . ., 

44 Eliz. 

20 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Braineford co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Heyward late of London yoman stole 
thirtie poundes of feathers worth forty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of Michael Goodyeare. Confessing the indictment, Richard 
Heyward asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was reprieved 
before he was branded. Cogn'ovit Indictamentum petit librum legit 
vt cl'icus rep', ante cremat. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz. 

22 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Heyes co. Midd. on 
the said day, John Worrall late of London yoman feloniously entered 
the dwelling-house of Mary Mynne widow, and stole therefrom twenty 
shillings, of the moneys of John Glysson ; and that, on the following 
day at Hillingdon co. Midd., Amy Blakey late of Hillingdon afore- 
said, knowing him to have committed the said felony, received, aided 
and comforted the same John Worrall. Putting himself ' Not Guilty,' 
John Worrall was acquitted ; Amy Blakey being exonerated in con- 
sequence of his acquittal. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 EUz. 

30 March, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Richard 
Candeler esq. J.P., of John Hoffe of Tottenham co. Midd. butcher in 
the sum of twenty pounds, and Robert Hooflfe of the same place 
butcher, in the sum of forty pounds ; For the appearance of the said 
Robert at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer to a charge of "hunt- 
inge and killinge certen of her Majesties deere in the forest of Wal- 
tham." G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz. 

31 March, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Pickthatch co. Midd. 
on the said day, Thomas Foulsome of the same place yoman, built a 
certain house called " his Meltinge house " upon and to a certain 
tenement there, against the form of the statute in this case provided. 
G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz. 



270 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS* ROLLS. 

I April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Nortonfollgate co. Midd. 
on the said day and for the time of an entire month, Susanna Newland 
late of the same parish spinster, impiously and diabolically kept a 
brothel, causing thereby riots and tumults, scandal amongst her neigh- 
bours, and " the overthrowing " of many of the Queen's lieges. Po se 
non cul nee r'. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz. 

5 April, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J. P., of John Lawrence of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West of 
London gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of William Law- 
raunce of St. Gregory's in London gentleman, in the sum of twenty 
pounds ; For the appearance of the same William Lawraunce at the 
next Gaol Delivery, to answer to a suspicion " of stealing ii shoes." 
G. D. R., 24 Apiil, 43 Eliz. 

. . . . 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances taken (on Friday in the 
third week of Lent) before Sir Edmund Anderson, knt, Chief Justice 
of the Queen's Bench, and George Kyngsmill, one of the Justices of 
the same bench, Cristofer Holgilb' alias Ogilb' of Kettleby co. Lincoln 
yeoman, of Robert Tyrwhitt of Kettlebye co. Lincoln esq., and Robert 
Markham of Newark co. Nott. esq., in the siim of two hundred pounds 
each ; For the appearance of the said Christopher Holgilb' alias Ogilb' 
at the next General Gaol Delivery of the Feast of Easter next ensuing, 
to answer to all such matters as shall be objected against him. G. D. R., 
24 April, 43 Eliz. 

6 April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at RatcUffe co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Newton late of London yoman assaulted Richard 
Baker, and murdered the same Richard by giving him with a rapiour 
on his left cheek a mortal wound, of which he died on the isth of the 
same month. Putting himself ' Not Guilty ' of murder, but ' Guilty ' 
of manslaughter, Thomas Newton asked for the book, read like a clerk, 
was marked with the letter T, and delivered according to the form of 
the Statute. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz. 

7 April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Millett late of London yoman 
broke into and entered the dweUing-house of Edward Harberte esq., 
and stole therefrom a silver porringer worth fifty shillings ; and That, 
knowing him to have committed the said felony, Robert Payne and 
Thomas Yarner, both late of London yomen, received, aided and com- 
forted the said Thomas Millett on 8 April 43 Eliz., in the aforesaid 
parish. Pleading his clergy, Thomas Millett was branded and delivered. 
G. D. R., 24 April, 43 EHz. 

15 April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes- 
without-the-Bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on the said day, 
Margaret Tayke late of London spinster stole a box worth two 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 27 1 

shillings, two white aprons worth three shillings, a payre of vpper- 
boddyes worth twelve pence, two linen sleeves worth twelve pence, 
five linen crosse-clothes worth eighteen pence, a linen handkercher 
worth two shillings, three hnen collars called fahnge bandes worth 
eighteen pence, three linen coyfes worth twelve pence, a leather purse 
called " a Barbarye purse " worth ten shiilings, a linen smock worth 
two shillings, a paire of Jercye stockens of silke-russett color (coloris 
silke russett) worth twelve pence, a linen table-napkin worth twelve 
pence, and two beddes for a child worth twelve pence, being in the 
same box, of the goods and chattels of Robert Whiskine. Putting 
herself ' Guilty ' of petty larceny, and the jury appraising all these 
goods and chattels at eleven pence, Margaret Tayke was liberated on 
payment of the fee. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz. 

20 April, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Henry 
Thoresby esq. J. P., of James Hunter of Rattcliff co. Midd. saylor, 
and Thomas Chamberlayne of Fleet Streete in London jewell-box 
maker, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the appearance at the 
next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against Clement Fishman and 
Katherine Ladbrooke. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz. 

23 April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin' s-in-the. 
Fields in the night of the said day, Thomas Fludde late of London 
yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Lady the 
Queen Elizabeth, and stole therefrom an olyffe-culloured velvet woman's 
gowne worth forty pounds, a figured satten woman's gowne "prone 
coloris" worth twenty-four pounds, a greene carpett worth three 
pounds, a pair of " curtaines for a windowe coloris watchett " worth 
forty shillings, nine dozen napkins worth sixteen pounds, a pair of 
" flaxen sheetes " worth fifty shillings, three linen smockes worth three 
pounds, and three shirts worth twenty shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of the Lady Frances Borroughe. At the bill's foot, the memo- 
randum " Respectuatus." G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz. 

27 April, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster in the 
night of the said day, William Harvye late of London yoman broke 
burglariously into the house of the Most Noble Edward Earl of Hert- 
ford, and stole therefrom " tria horologia de auro et argento et ahis 
metallis voc' clockes " worth three hundred pounds. Putting himself 
' Guilty,' William Harvye was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 
27 May, 43 Eliz. 

19 May, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway of St An- 
drew's in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Calverley late 
of London gentleman assaulted Christofer Beare, and with a rapiour 
gave the same Christofer on his throat a mortal blow, of which he 
then and there in the said highway died instantly. On his arraignment 



272 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

Thomas Calverley put himself 'Not Guilty' of manslaughter, but 
' Guilty ' of defending himself. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz. 

20 May, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the Parsonage Close at 
Harlington co. Midd. on the said day, John Hunte late of London 
yoman " quamdam vaccam coloris brynded fugavit in quoddam fossa- 
tum . . . et cum vacca ilia adtunc et ibidem existente carna- 

alem copulationem habuit &c." Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Hunte 
was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz. 

28 May, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard Newton of the said parish skynner made of 
wheat fifty pounds of starch, and on the same day sold the same starch 
to divers of the Queen's lieges, against the form of Her Majesty's 
proclamation, in that case published. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 

4 June, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the said day at St. 
Johnstreete co. Midd., Henry Feildinge, servant of Sir James Scuda- ' 
more, knt, and Richard Stevenson, another servant of Sir James Scuda- 
more knt., assaulted Samuel Cartred in his dwelling-house, and that 
with a sword the same Henry Feildinge then and there gave the same 
Samuel Cartred a mortal blow, of which he died on some day, no longer 
to be discovered from the decayed bill. Henry Feildinge and Richard 
Stevenson were both at large. G. D. R., . . . .,43 Eliz. 

24 June, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at "le Stronde" co. 
Midd. on the said day, Robert Harecourte late of London yoman stole 
a rapiour with silvered hiltes worth ten shillings, a daggar with silvered 
hilte worth five shillings " unum parr' vestiment' cerici et auri voc' a 
pare of hangers of silke and golde" worth thirty shillings, a white 
satten dublett worth twenty shillings, a pare of white silke stockens 
worth thirteen shillings, a shirt worth three shillings, and a collar called 
" a band " worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas 
Tufton esq. Confessing the indictment, Robert Harecourte asked for 
the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of 
the statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz. 

25 June, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Harrison esq. J. P., of Nicholas Foster of Westminster scholemaster in 
the sum of ten pounds, and of Hercules Scregge tayler and Robert 
Sandes cordwainer, both of the said city, in the sum of five pounds 
each : For the appearance of the said Nicholas Foster at the next 
Session of the Peace, there having been " found in his house a scanda- 
lous ballett or libell in print betwixt a Papist and Protestant," and he 
having " confessed that he had the same [? from an] other unknown 
Mr. Skinner." G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz. 

6 July, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Hollowaye late of London yoman stole a 



MfDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 273 

woollen-cloth cloak " colons sageculler '' worth ten shillings, a purpell 
woollen-cloth cloak worth fifty shillings, a dagger worth two shillings, a 
lether girdle worth two pence, divers pieces of linen called " falinge 
Bandes and Ruffes " worth six shillings and eightpence, and a cloke- 
bagge of motteley culler worth three shillings and four pence, of the 
goods and chattels of Arthur Staverton gentleman. — Also two other 
True Bills against John Hollowaye for stealing, at Westminster on the 
20th of the same July, divers articles of personal apparel (including a 
woollen-cloth cloak of phessante culler), of the goods and chattels of 
Arthur Staverton. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Hollowaye asked for the 
book ; but, evidence being offered that he had been guilty of burglary 
in Berkshire, he was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 

20 July, 43 Flizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Tobias 
Wode esq. J.P., of William Bradley taylour and George Lunne turnour, 
both of Ratcliffe co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of 
John Peerce of the same place taylour, in the sum of forty pounds ; 
For the said John Peerce's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, he 
being suspected " of steling of iii shepe from Walter Garnons at 
Coockoldes Haven in the com. of Surrey." G. D. R., . . . ., 
43 Eliz. 

27 July, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill against John Knollis late of 
Popler in the parish of Stebunheath co. Midd. gentleman, for not 
going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer during 
the two months next following the said 27th of July. — Also, two several 
True Bills against John Clarke late of Lytaehouse in the parish of 
Stebunheathe co. Midd. clothworker, and Richard Savage jun'., late of 
Popler in Stebunheath yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any 
usual place of Common Prayer during the same aforesaid two months. 
G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 

9 August, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fullham co. Midd. 
on the said day, Arthur Sotherton and Griffin Thomas, both late of 
London yomen broke into the dwelling-house of Richard the Bishop of 
London, and there stole a silver salte worth four pounds, of the goods and 
chattels of the Lady the Queen EUzabeth, the said Queen in her Royal 
Majesty being then and there at Fullham and in the said house ; and 
further That, knowing the same Arthur and Griffin to have perpetrated 
the said felony, Edmund Dye late of London yoman feloniously re- 
ceived and comforted them at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the loth of 
Aug. 43 Eliz. In Latin the charge against the thieves was that 
they, on the aforesaid 9th of August, " Domum Mansionalem Ricardi 
Episcopi London scituatam et existentem apud Fullham in predicto 
comitatu Midd. felonice fregerunt et intraverunt et vnam salinam argenti 
vocatam a silver Salte ad valenciam iiii li de bonis et cattallis dicte 

T 



274 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

dominenostre Regine Elizabethe(eadem domina Regina adtunc in regali 
Maj estate sua existente apud Fullham predictam in predicto comitatu 
Midd. et in domo mansionali predicta) adtunc et ibidem inventam 
felonice furati fuere ceperunt et asportaverunt. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 
43 Eliz. 

12 August, 43 ELizABETH.^Recognizances, taken before Tobias 
Wood esq. J. P., of John Williams of Wappinge co. Midd. carpenter, 
in the sum of ten pounds, and of Reynold Holdway of Whitechappell 
smyth, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Reynold Holdway's 
appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, he being thus " bound ouer for 
that he is chardged by Richard Brock of Wapping smyth to have beaten 
his owne wife, of which beating she dyed." G. D. R., 2 Oct., 
43 Eliz. 

27 August, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Ralph 
Waller esq. J.P., of George Page yoman and Richard Spright butcher, 
both of Cowe Crosse co. Midd., in the sum of ... . each, and 
of George Baylye of Cowe Crosse aforesaid glover and Mary his wife, 
in the sum of one hundred pounds ; For the appearance of the said 
George Baylye and Mary Baylye at the next Session of the Peace. At 
the foot of the bill, this memorandum — " This is for recusantes that 
wilnot come to the church, [? and] for loydging of seminaries in the 
terme tyme." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 43 Eliz. 

29 August, 43 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J. P., of Richard Lewes taylour and Gilbart Spicer gould- 
smith, both of St. Buttolph's-without-Aldgate, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and Lawrence Lawfe of Charterhouselane co. Midd. yoman, in 
the sum of twenty pounds ; For the appearance of the said Lawrence 
at the next Session of the Peace, to answer for " threateninge to burne 
divers houses." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 43 Eliz. 

2 September, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Tottenham co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, John Bryan late of Loudon yoman 
broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of George Kempe esq., 
and stole therefrom a pair of blacke silke garters, of the goods and 
chattels of Thomas Woodhouse esq., then staying in the said house. 
Putting himself ' Not Guilty ' of the burglary, but ' Guilty ' of the 
felony, John Bryan was allowed benefit of clergy. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 
43 Eliz. 

25 September, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. 
Midd. on the said day, Thomas Bayleye late of London yoman stole 
seven " skynnes of Budge," of the goods and chattels of William 
Clarke. Putting himself ' Guilty,' he asked for the book, and was 
reprieved before judgment. Po se cul ca null petit libru repri ante 
judiciu'. G D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 275 

31 October, 43 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Tower Wharfe co. 
Midd. on the said day, William Phillippes late of London yoman stole 
" duas balistas eris anglice two pieces of ordinaunce called Brasse 
Fawcons" worth fourteen pounds, of the goods and chattels of 
the Most Serene Lady the Queene Elizabeth. G. D. R., 26 May, 
44 Eliz. 

6 November, 43 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Harmondsworthe 
CO. Midd. on the said day, Robert Budden late of the said parish 
yoman assaulted his wife Margery Budden with malice aforethought, 
and murdered her by seizing her neck with his hands and wringing and 
breaking it. Putting himself ' Guilty,' Robert Budden was sentenced 
to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

30 November, 44 Elizabeth. — True^Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. and elsewhere in the' said county on the said day 
and at other times before and afterwards, Willimott Golde alias Willson 
late of London spinster, a lazy and vagabond person, published and 
spread divers false rumours respecting the Queen, amongst the Queen's 
subjects. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

4 December, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Charterhouse 
CO. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, 
John Sankey and John Billengesley, both of Charterhouselane gentle- 
men, used and haunted "a dicinge house" situated and being in the 
said Charterhouse. G. D. R., .... April, 44 Eliz. 

10 December, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Hygate co. Midd. on the said day, Bartholomew Turpin late of London 
yoman assaulted Simon Fielder, and robbed him of a leather purse 
worth two pence, and a piece of gold worth three pounds. G. D. R., 
15 Feb., 44 Eliz. 

20 December, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at 
Howneslowe Heathe in the parish of Eastbedfounte co. Midd. on 
the said day, Thomas Hylliard alias Higgins, late of London yoman, 
assaulted a certain unknown man and robbed him of three pounds in 
numbered money. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz. 

31 December, 44 Elizabeth. — Thirteen several True Bills against 
the following thirteen persons for not going to church, chapel or any 
usual place of Common Prayer, — viz., (i) Elizabeth Crossefeilde late of 
St. Andrew's in Holborne widow, (2) Henry Jemingham jun'. late of St. 
Clement's Danes gentleman, (3) Thomas Culpepper late of St. Clement's 
Danes gentleman, (4) Elizabeth Mordaunt late of St. Clement's Danes 
widow, (s) Thomas Booker late of St. Andrew's in Holborne gentle- 
man, (6) Paul Wilkinson late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, (7) 
William Cobbe late of St. Andrew's in Holborne gentleman, (8) James 
Godwyn late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman (against all eight for 



T 2 



276 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, 
during the six months following the said 31 Dec. 44 Eliz.), (9) Mary 
Newdigate late of Hampton co. Midd. spinster, (10) Margery Blasson 
late of Hampton co. Midd. spinster, alias Margery Blasson wife of 
John Blasson of the same place . . . . , fn) John Clarke late 
of Stepney co. Midd. yoman, (12) Joan Snodon late of Cranford co. 
Midd. spinster, alias Joan Snodon wife of Richard Snodon of the same 
place yoman (against all four, for not going to church &c. for the three 
months, beginning on 10 March 44 Eliz.) and (13) Laurejice Buttes 
late of St. James's in Clerkenwell co. Midd. gentleman, for not going 
to any usual place of Common Prayer, during the month beginning on 
6 May, 44 Eliz. ; each bill having at the foot a memorandum, that 
proclamation had been made in accordance with the form of the 
Statute. — Preserved by themselves in the same file (dated on the 
wrapper, 25 June, 44 Eliz.) these thirteen True Bills are prefaced by a 
long memorandum, that, proclamation having been made for the per- 
sons so indicted to surrender their bodies to the Sheriff of Middlesex 
at the next General Gaol Delivery of Newgate, then and there to 
answer to charges of trespasses and contempts, and twelve of them failing 
to surrender themselves in accordance with the proclamation at the 
Gaol Delivery, made on ist September, 44 Eliz., each of the persons 
so failing to appear was convicted of the same trespasses and contempts. 
Thomas Culpepper surrendered himself ; when it was ordered that he 
should be discharged of the indictment, should he be present on the 
next Lord's Day at prayers and sermon, at St. Andrew's church in 
Holborn. Respecting William Cobbe (named in the body of the 
writing as one of the twelve recusants, convicted on failing to appear 
and surrender) it is recorded in the last line of the Memorandum, 
" And the aforesaid William Cobbe appeared and is exonerated of the 
indictment.'' G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

13 January, 44 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Harlington co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Pemmer late of Westdraiton co. Midd. 
gardener administered in a potion a certain quantity of the powdered 
root of White Elebore to Anne, the wife of Robert Fisher of Harling- 
ton ; and that she being at that time sick, and ignorant of the effect of 
so great a quantity of White Elebore, and being persuaded by John 
Pemmer it would be a remedy for her sickness, took the same powder, 
and by reason of taking it died on the eighteenth of the same month : 
and that in so persuading her to take the same powder the said John 
killed and slew the same Anne ; there being no charge that he murdered 
her. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz. 

20 January, 44 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on the said day, William Owen alias Jones and John 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 2/7 

Kinge alias Kymes, both late of London yomen, broke into the dwell- 
ing-house of Sir Thomas Egerton lent., Keeper of the Great Seal, and 
stole therefrom two woollen-cloth cloaks of divers colours worth six 
pounds, and two woollen-cloth hattes worth ten shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of certain unknown men : And Further that Edward 
Bickerstaffe, late of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. broker, knowing 
them to have perpetrated the said felony, received aided comforted the 
same William and John at St. Clement's Danes on 2 1 Jan. 44 Eliz. — 
William Owen put himself ' Guilty ' and had no chattels : John Kinge 
was at large ; putting himself ' Guilty,' Edward Bickerstaife asked for 
the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and 
was delivered according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 
44 Eliz. 

24 January, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before John 
Grange esq. J.P., of Edward Owyn of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. 
gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the said Edward Owyn's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace, at The Castle near 
Smythfeilde Barres, then and there to answer " for beinge an Inmate in 
the house of one Oliver Gwinne." — Also, the Recognizance, taken on 
the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, of Oliver Gwinne 
of St. Giles's-in the-Fields barber, in the sum of ten pounds, for his 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace held at The Castle near 
Smythfeilde Barres, then and there to answer "for receavinge one 
Edward Owyn and his wife, one Fetherbee and his wife and one Mabell 
Brooke into his howse as inmates." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz. 

13 February, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J.P., of Henry Cheeke and Walter Darrell, both of Greyes 
Inn gentlemen, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Asculph 
Clevesbee (servant of the said Henry Cheeke), in the sum of forty 
pounds; For the said Asculph Clevesbee's appearance at the next 
Gaol Delivery of Newgate, he being suspected " of fellony for stealinge 
a sylver cuppe forthe of the taverne where " he and certain of his 
fellows " were a drinkinge." — Also, three other sets of Recognizances, 
taken before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of 
Jervis Errington (servant of Nicholas Lee of Greyes Inn gentleman), 
Richard Greevell (servant of Walter Darrell of Greyes Inne gentleman), 
and WilUam Hardinge (servant of William Fludde of Greyes Inne 
gentleman) at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, they being suspected 
" of felony for stealing a sylver cupp forth of a taverne where they were 
a-drinkinge." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz. 

16 February, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at NortonfoUgate in 
the parish of St. Leonerd in Shordiche co. Midd. on the said day, 
Robert Anthony, Michael Pudsey, Richard Brewer, William Tame, 



278 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

John Roall, John Davies, Robert Jackson, John Littlewood, Richard 
Reade, William Gallante, Michael Springell and Hugh Williams, all 
late of London yomen, together with twenty unknown disturbers of the 
peace, armed with staves and clubbes and other weapons, assembled 
riotously and in warlike manner, and made forcibly an unlawful entry 
into the dwelling-house of Helen Howell, and prostrated it to the ground. 
G. D. R., IS Feb., 44 Eliz. 

1 7 February, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
CoUyn esq. J. P., of John Banckes of the precinct of St. Katherine 
near The Tower of London cordwainer, and Henry Wyndes of St. 
Buttolph's-without-Bishopsgate cordwainer, in the sum of ten pounds 
each, and of Robert Jackson of St. Katherine's aforesaid cordwainer, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Robert Jackson's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer " for an vnlawfuU 
assembly on shrove-tuesday." — Also, four other sets of Recognizances, 
taken before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of 
Edward Graves bricklayer and Andrewe Lincolne butcher, both of 
Norton-Folgate, John Davies of St. Bridgett's cutler, Richard Parrys 
servant of Thomas Parrys citizen and innholder of London, and Alex- 
ander Bowker apprentice of Thomas Salisbury citizen and draper of 
London, at the next Session of the Peace, then and there to answer 
for their parts in, or to give evidence against persons taking part in the 
same "vnlawfull assembly on shrove-tuesday." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 
44 Eliz. 

27 February, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fullham co. Midd. 
in the night of the said day, John Gorney and John Hopkyns both 
late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the house of Edmund 
Hilton, and stole therefrom " a copper styll " worth fifty-two shillings, 
of the goods and chattels of the said Edmund. John Hopkins put 
himself ' Not Guilty ' and did not retract. Putting himself ' Guilty ' 
of the felony, but ' Not Guilty ' of the burglary, John Gorney asked 
for the book, read like a clerk, was branded with the letter T, 
and delivered in accordance with the Statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 
44 Eliz. 

28 February, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Pancras co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Waynam late of London 
gentleman assaulted Robert Jones late of London gendeman, and 
slew him by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the right 
shoulder, of which wound he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., 
. . . ., 44 Eliz. 

6 March, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John 
Grange esq. J.P., of Henry Newdigate of Hampton co. Midd. gentle- 
man, and Robert Christopher of Stanwell co. Midd. gentleman, in 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 279 

the sum of forty pounds each, and Edward Haslerigg late of London 
gentleman, in the sum of eighty pounds; For the said Edward 
Haslerigg's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. At the 
foot of the bill, this memorandum by John Grange J.P., " The L. Cheefe 
Justice of England did send vnto me to bayll this gent' committed to 
the Marshalsye by his L^. I know not for what cause." G. D. R., 
. . . ., 44 Eliz. 

7 March, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fynnesberrye in the 
parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., William Kindlemarshe 
late of London yoman assaulted Edward Tumber, when he was in 
God's and the Queen's peace, and murdered him by giving him with 
'' a staffe " a mortal blow on the right side of his head, of which blow 
the said Edward then and there died instantly. G. D. R., . . . ., 
44 Eliz. 

13 March, 44 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Bartholomew 
Turpyn late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that 
the said Bartholomew Turpyn died in the gaol, by Divine Visitation 
of " a pyninge sicknes," on the 1 2th inst. after a month's illness. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

20 March, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Fullham co. Midd. 
in the night of the said day, George Greene alias Kerke late of 
London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the 
Reverend in Christ Richard Bishop of London and stole therefrom 
five carpettes of divers colours worth ten pounds, of the goods and 

chattels of the said Bishop. Po se cul ca null Sus. G. D. R , 

44 Eliz. 

31 March, 44 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Clement Clarke 
late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that the said 
Clement Clarke died in the gaol by Divine Visitation of a " pyning 
sicknes" on the same day, after three weeks' illness. G. D. R., 
, . . ., 44 Eliz. 

I April, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 
CO. Midd. in the night of the same day, Thomas NicoUs yoman and 
John Moore taylor alias John West yoman, both late of London, broke 
burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Walter Raleighe knt. in 
the said parish, and stole therefrom two linen " pillowbeeres .... 
fitted with silke and golde" worth ten pounds, a linen "cushinge 
cloth " adorned with silk and gold worth five pounds, and a diaper 
tablecloth worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said 
Sir Walter Raleigh. — Also, in the same file, another True Bill against 
the same burglars for entering burglariously, at the same parish in the 



28o MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

night of 20 Jan. 44 Eliz., the dwelling-house of Sir John Stannehoppe 
knt., and stealing therefrom five ornaments called cushinges worth three 
pounds, a carpett worth twenty shillings, and a woollen-cloth " skrene- 
cloth " worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir John Stanne- 
hoppe knt. — Also, in the same file, another indictment against the 
same burglars, for breaking burglariously into the dwelling-house of the 
Most Noble Thomas Lord Burghley at the Strond co. Midd., in the 
night of I Feb. 44 Eliz., and stealing therefrom a red velvet coverlett 
worth twenty pounds, " fower curtaines of braunched damaske " worth 
five pounds, and " a braunched damaske carpett " worth ten pounds, of 
the goods and chattels of the said Most Noble Thomas, the Lord 
Burglieley. Thomas Nicolls confessed both indictments; John Moore 
alias West was at large. G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

I April, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Edward 
Vaughan esq. J.P., of William Dickinson of Horton co. Bucks, hus- 
bandman, in the sum of one hundred marks ; For the said William's 
appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to be held at The Castle 
at St. John's Street, for his continuance within the jurisdiction of the 
Justices of the County of Middlesex till he should have their licence to 
depart, and in the mean time for his peaceful bearing to the Rt. Hon. 
the Lord Keeper and all the Queen's other lieges. G. D. R., 2 5 June, 
44 Eliz. 

. . . ., 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Christopher 
Rithe esq. J. P., on the 4th day of a month no longer discoverable 
from the decayed document, of Peter Haull of Isleworth co. Midd. 
tailer, in the sum of five pounds ; For the said Peter's evidence 
against John Cockes now a prisoner in Newgate, " concerninge the 
robbing of John Argo, one of the cariers of Oxford." G. D. R., 
. . . ., 44 Eliz. 

5 April, 44 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken 
within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Edward Hodgson late 
of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said 
Edward Hodgson died in the gaol by Divine Visitation of-the " pyninge 
sicknes'' on the same day, after three weeks' illness, G. D. R., 
. . . ., 44 Eliz. 

9 April, 44 Elizabeth. — Two sets of Recognizances, taken before 
Richard Candeler esq. J. P., for the appearance of John Hooffe and 
Robert Pate, both of Tottenham co. Midd. yomen, at the next Session 
of the Peace, then and there to answer to a charge of '■ puUinge 
downe bridges gates styles and breakinge glasse wyndowes on Easter 
daye last in the night." G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

14 April, 44 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Richard Tiler 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 28 1 

late of London yoman, there lying dead : With Verdict that, on the 
13th inst., the said Richard died in the gaol by Divine Visitation of 
" a pyninge sicknes," after thirteen days of illness. G. D. R., . . . ., 
44 Eliz. 

IS April, 44 ElizaSeth.— True Bill that, at the parish of St. 
Clement-Danes without the Bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on 
the said day, Robert Watkinson late of London clerk alias Robert 
Willson late of London clerk, born within this kingdom of England, 
viz. at Hemingbrough co. York after the Feast of the Nativity of 
St John the Baptist i Eliz., and made and ordained a priest in parts 
beyond the sea by authority derived from the See of Rome before the 
last day of March 44 Eliz., in no degree weighing the laws and statutes 
of this kingdom, nor having respect for the penalty contained in 
them, was and remained traitorously and as a traitor, in contempt of 
the crown and dignity of the same Queen, and against the form of the 
statute for this case published and provided. " Po se cul ca null : 
h'eat judiciu'."=He put himself 'Guilty,' had no chattels; let him 
have judgment. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

7 May, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before John Grange 
esq. J.P., of Edward Knighte yeoman and John WoUy gentleman, 
both of Golding Lane co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each; For 
the appearance of Katherine WoUy, wife of the said John Wolly, at 
the next General Session of the Peace and in the mean time for her 
peaceful behaviour. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 44 Eliz. 

8 May, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Tobias Woode 
esq. J.P., of Libeus Perkins alias Lee of Whitechappell horseguelder, 
in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Libeus Perkins's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace, then and there to answer unto 
such matters as may be objected against him. G. D. R., 25 June, 
44 Eliz. 

14 May, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Henry 
Thoresby esq. J. P., of Edmund Petty of Whitechappell co. Midd. 
tincker, in the sum of twenty pounds ; For the said Edmund's appear- 
ance at the next Session of the Peace, because he " keepeth companie 
with one Christian Owen beinge another man's wiefe." 

22 May, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, on the highway at Hownes- 
lowe CO. Midd. on the said day, Francis Kember late of London gentle- 
man assaulted William Peverell, and with a certain instrument called 
a pistol, which he the said Francis with his right hand pointed at the 
said William's breast, put the said William in great fear and terror. 
G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

22 May, 44 Eljzabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Ambrose 
Copinger esq. J.P., of William Peverell the Queen's servant in the 



282 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

office called " The Waxe Chandrie," in the sum of twenty pounds ; For 
the said William Peverell's appearance at the next Session of the Peace 
in Middlesex, to give evidence against Francis Kember gentleman, now 
in Newgate Gaol. G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

25 May, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Mile-end 
in Stepney co. Midd. between eleven and twelve in the night of the 
said day, Roger Some late of London gentleman assaulted Rowland 
Pottell, and with " a pistoll " charged with gunpowder and " dropshott " 
murdered the same Rowland Pottell, by discharging the said pistol at 
him, so as to give him a wound in the high part of his left thigh, of 
which wound he then and there in the said highway died instantly ; 
And That Thomas White late of London haberdasher, and William 
Gerlinge late of London yoman (servant of George Hill of London 
vintener) were then and there present, abetting strengthening and 
aiding the same Roger Some to perpetrate the said murder. On his 
arraignment, putting himself ' Guilty ' of manslaughter, but ' Not 
Guilty ' of murder, Roger Some pleaded his clergy, read like a clerk, 
was branded with the letter T, and delivered according to the Statute. 
In like manner, Thomas White and William Gerling pleaded their 
clergy, and after being branded with the letter T were delivered. 
G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

29 May, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Lincolnes Inne co. 
Midd. in the night of the said day, William Pleasinglon alias Pleasante 
alias Cutler late of London yoman, William Howe late of Redcrosse- 
streete co. Midd. gentleman, John Moore late of London gentleman, 
and James Rawlinson late of London gentleman, broke burglariously 
into the chamber of Robert Gawsell gentleman and Thomas Beding- 
field esq., and stole therefrom a clothe gowne worth three pounds, a 
satten dublett worth twenty-three shillings, a silk dublett worth twenty- 
three shillings, a pair of black velvett breeches worth twenty-nine shil- 
lings, and a pair of linen sheets worth ten shillings, of the goods and 
chattels of the said Robert Gawsell, and a rapior worth thirteen shil- 
lings and sixpence, and a black hatt worth four shillings, of the goods 
and chattels of Francis Parlett gentleman. All four burglars were at 
large. G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

4 June, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in the highway at Stanwell 
CO. Midd. on the said day, William Gibson, late of London clothworker, 
assaulted one Simon Jackson, when he was in God's and the Queen's 
peace, and with a dagger murdered him, by giving him in the left 
side of his breast with the same weapon a mortal wound, of which he 
then and there in the said highway died instantly. On his arraign- 
ment, putting himself ' Guilty ' of manslaughter, but ' Not Guilty ' of 
murder, William Gibson pleaded his clergy, whereupon the book was 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 283 

given to him. But as he could not read like a clerk, he was sen- 
tenced to be hung. G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz. 

6 June, 44 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. 
on the said day, Morgan James late of London yoman stole a 
"copper kettle" worth eighteen shillings, of the goods and chattels 
of Margery Gardener. Putting himself ' Guilty ' and asking for the 
book, Morgan Jones read like a clerk, was marked with the letter 
T, and was delivered according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R., 
25 June, 44 Eliz. 

13 June, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Johns-streete co. 
Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Maccoe late of London spinster 
broke into the dwelling-house of William Fittz Williams esq., and stole 
therefrom a pepper-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth six shillings, 
and a violet-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth six shillings, of the 
goods and chattels of Roger Prichard. Putting herself 'Guilty,' 
Elizabeth pleaded pregnancy ; but, on being found ' Not Pregnant ' by 
a jury of matrons, she was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 25 June, 
44 Eliz. 

23 June, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Ratcliffe co. Midd. on 
the said day, Agnes Abrahall, wife of William Abrahall of the said 
parish marriner, assaulted Anne Muffett, and with her teeth bit Anne 
Muffett severely so as to wound the right-hand thumb. G. D. R., 
25 June, 44 Eliz. 

28 June, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizance, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J.P., of George Padge of St. Sepulchre's parish, London, 
yoman, in the sum of ten pounds ; For the appearance of George 
Bayly and his wife Mary Bayly at the next Session of the Peace, the 
said George and Mary Bayly being " suspected of recusancie." 
G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

29 June, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Woxbridge co. Midd. 
on the said day, John Clarke late of London yoman, in the presence 
and hearing of divers persons, said to one Richard Ogborne, constable 
of the said parish, these scandalous and seditious words, to the Queen's 
defamation, to wit, " Why dorst thou tell me of the Queene ? A turde 
for the Queene." At the head of the bill, this memorandum, — " Rep', 
to be continued vppon good baile, by M'. Attorney Generall." G. D. R., 
. . . ., 44 Eliz. 

4 July, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. 
on the said day, James Doggett late of London yoman, in the presence 
and hearing of divers persons, said to one Robert Dyer these 
scandalous words to the Queen's defamation, to wit, " A pox and a 
vengeance of all those whatsoever that made this statute for the poore 
and punishement of Rogues and a pox of all those that would foUowe 



284 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

her Majestie any more.'' At the foot of the bill, this memorandum, 
" f^ngr' respectuatur p' Cur' =Trespass ; it is deferred by the Court.' 
G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

5 July, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Bednolgrene in the parish 
of Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Gilbert Mason late of Bednol- 
grene aforesaid laborer assaulted John Vanderley, and with a cowle- 
staffe gave him on the right side of his head a mortal blow, of which 
he died at Bednolgrene on the following day. On his arraignment, 
Gilbert Mason put himself ' Guilty ' of defending himself, but ' Not 
Guilty' of manslaughter. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

5 July, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before William 
Harrison esq. J.P., of William Dugdale of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields 
tipler, and Ralph Shard of the same parish yoman, in the sum of 
ten pounds each ; For William Dugdale's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace for co. Midd., and in the mean time for 
his peaceful behaviour. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 44 Eliz. 

14 July, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Nicholas 
Collyn esq. J. P., of Robert Creswell of Clifford's Inne gentleman and 
Garnishe Topffield of Frisenfeld co. Suffolk gentleman, in the sum of 
ten pounds each ; For the appearance of Martha Bell at the next Ses- 
sion of the Peace, she being " suspected for a whore." G. D. R., 
. . . ,, 44 Eliz. 

24 July, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the- 
Fields CO. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Slipper, late of ... . 
yoraan, broke into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Egerton knt.. 
Keeper of the Great Seal, and stole therefrom a silver dish worth four 
pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Thomas Egerton 
knt. " Po se cul ca null sus." G. D.R., . . . .,44 Eliz. 

25 July, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Chidioc 
Wardoure and William Harrison esqs. J.P., of Phillip Lacon of St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds, John 
Carter of Lambeth Marsh co. Surrey yeoman, and Richard Quarington 
of Edgeworth co. Midd. wheelewright, in the sum of ten pounds each ; 
For the appearance of Anne, wife of the said Phillip Lacon, at the 
next General Session of the Peace, she having been " taken at Hamer- 
smith wearing of man's apparel and for the same committed to the 
Gaole of Newgate." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 44 Eliz. 

7 August, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. 
on the said day, Edward Cole of Westminster co. Midd. butcher 
with a sword struck and wounded William Elliott, so that his life was 
despaired. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz. 

— August, 44 Elizabeth. — Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, 
taken at Fulham co. Midd. on view of the body of John Burton, there 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 285 

lying dead : With Verdict that, on 21st July last past, the said John 
Burton and a certain Abraham Cannon were drinking together in the 
highway of . . . .in the ward of Cheape in London, when they 
quarreled and made an affray, in which affray Abraham Cannon 
gave John Burton in the right part of his back a mortal blow, of 
which he died on loth August, then next following. On his arraign- 
ment, Abraham Cannon put himself ' Not Guilty ' of the felonious 
slaughter of John Burton and did not retract ; and the Jury found 
that " Johannes Death occidit predictum Johannem Burton," =that 
John Death slew the aforesaid John Burton. G. D. R., . . . ., 
44 Eliz. 

1 7 August, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, in a certain place called 
" a house of office " at Westminster co. Midd. between two and three 
a.m. of the said day, Joan Bulte late of London spinster, assaulted a 
female infant, to which she had given birth, and murdered the same 
infant by crushing-in its head with her hands and strangling it with a 
girdle ; and that Joan Pyke wife of Thomas Pyke late of Westminster, 
alias Joan Pyke of Westminster spinster, was then and there present, 
aiding and abetting Joan Bulte to perpetrate the said murder. Putting 
herself ' Guilty,' Joan Bulte was sentenced to be hung. Joan Pyke put 

herself 'Not Guilty,' and did not retract. G. D. R , 

44 Eliz. 

19 August, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Mile-end co. Midd. 
on the said day, Richard EUficke late of London yoman stole a parcel- 
gilt silver bason worth twenty pounds, a parcel-gilt silver ewer worth 
six pounds, a parcel-gilt silver " salte " worth ten pounds, a parcel-gilt 
silver " standing cuppe " worth six pounds, " a great gilte bowle " worth 
six pounds, ten silver-gilt spoones worth five pounds and six shillings, 
" a Jewell of golde " worth six pounds, a gold ring called " a hooped 
ringe " worth twenty shillings, " a silver box " worth five shillings, 
" novem alias parcellas argenti vocat' parcells of plate " and three covers 
of silver worth forty pounds, and fifty-seven pounds and seven shillings 
in numbered money, and nine pounds and sixteen shillings of coined 
gold, in a purse of clothe of silver worth three pounds, of the goods, 
chattels and moneys of Thomas Twiste esq., sergeant-at-arms of the 
Lady the Queen. Memorandum ' Respectuatur'=it is deferred. 
G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz- 

21 September, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Tobias 
Wood esq. J. P., of Mathewe Whitberde and William Heywarde, both 
of Whitechappell co. Midd. bricklayers, in the sum of ten pounds each, 
and of John Newman of the same parish " Picture-drawer," in the sum 
of twenty pounds ; For the said John Newman's appearance at the next 
General Session of the Peace, he being thus " bound over for keepinge 



286 MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 

and lyving with Anne Roterham as his wiefe for 8 or 9 yeares and 
nowe marrying one Fraunces whom he also kepte before he married 
her." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 44 Eliz. 

21 September, 44 Elizabeth. — Recognizances, taken before Tobias 
Wood esq. J. P., of Mathew Whitberde and William Hey warde, both 
of Whitechappell bricklayers, in the sum of ten pounds each ; For the 
appearance of Frances Newman, wife of John Newman "picture 
drawer " at the next General Session of the Peace. At the foot of the 
bill this not quite intelligible memorandum, "Newman lived with 
another woman for 8 or 9 yeares as his wiefe duringe parte of which 
tyme this Fraunces dwelt with them, and knowinge this Newman had 
the use of her bodie, and after she married with her said master, 
G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 44 Eliz. 

3 October, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. 
Midd. on the said day, John Kelsicke, late of . . . ., assaulted 
Robert Hall, when he was in God's and the Queen's peace, and with a 
dagger worth sixpence gave the same Robert in his right thigh a mortal 
wound, of which he then and there died instantly. G. D. R., i Dec, 
45 Eliz. 

9 October, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the parish " beati 
Petri Vinculi" {sic) near the Tower of London on the said day, 
Hugh Perry of the said parish cutler assaulted and beat Jocosa Powell 
spinster with a bromestaffe, and bruised her severely. G. D. R., 
19 Jan., 45 Eliz. 

29 October, 44 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Saffronhill in St. 
Andrew's in Holborn on the said day, John Bushrove [sic) late of London 
alien assaulted Richard Hurte, and with a rapior gave the same 
Richard in the right side a mortal wound, of which he then and there 
died instantly. Putting himself ' Guilty,' John Bushrowe {sic) pleaded 
his clergy, was branded and delivered. G. D. R., i Dec, 45 Eliz. 

31 October, 44 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at the Charterhouse 
CO. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Moore and Thomas 
Niccolles, both late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the 
dwelUng-house of the Most Noble Thomas Lord Hayward, and stole 
therefrom five pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods, chattels and 
moneys of the said lord. G. D. R., i Dec, 45 Eliz. 

4 December, 45 Elizabeth. — True Bill that, at St. Margaret's 
Westminster and in a cellar there of the dwelling-house of the Most 
Noble Henry Earl of Lincoln, on the said day, Richard Blake late 
of London yoman assaulted Susan Calverlye, "et eandem Susannam 
adtunc et ibidem felonice et contra volUntatem ejusdem Susanne rapuit 
defloravit et carnaliter cognovit." Po se cul ca null sus. G. D. R., 
19 Jan, 45 EUz. 



MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' ROLLS. 287 

31 December, 45 Elizabeth.— True Bill that, at Pickthatch co. 
Midd. on the said day and throughout the month next preceding the 
same day, Francis Curatory late of Pickthatch aforesaid and his wife 
Mary Curatory kept a com